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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 




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Copyrighted, 1919. and published weekly by the Clipper Corporation. 1604 Broadway. New York. Entered it tka Pott-office at New York, June 24, 1879. at accood-class mall matter nnder Act of March 3, 1879. 



Founded by 
FRA&K QUEEN, 1853 



NEW YORK, AUGUST 6, 1919. 



VOLUME LXVn-No. » 
Prico, Tea Carta, *4.00 a Year 



A, L ERLANGER 
TO BUILD 12 

THREE TO BE IN NEW YORK 



A. L. Erlanger early this week admit- 
ted that he is planning to build twelve 
new theatres throughout the United 
States. To that end he baa completed 
arrangements with - Marshall and Fox, 
architects of Chicago, who not only have 
been retained to draw the plana for each 
house, but will also supervise the con- 
struction work. 

The theatres will be erected on a uni- 
form basis, each house having the same 
style of architecture, the same color 
acheme and the same sort of decorations 
and furnishings. Each row of chairs will 
be far enough apart for people to pass in 
and out without disturbing others. 

The twelve theatres are divided among 
five different cities throughout the coun- 
try, as follows:- Three in New York, 
three in Chicago, three in Philadelphia, 
two in Boston and one in Detroit. 

Whether the new theatres in the va- 
rious cities are all to be on the sites of 
old ones', or whether new sites have been 
acquired and just where these sites are 
located, Mr. Erlanger refused to state. ■ 
However, he did state that the first new 
theatre to be erected would be on the site 
upied by _ the Forrest Theatre in 
lphia, which wQl be demolished 
year to make room for the new 
lanned. Nor would Mr.-Krlanger 
amount of capital that his fu- ■ 



SAYS ACTORS BEAT HIM 

Atlastic Cm, Aug. 4. — John Wood- 
ruff and Jesse Bcrkowitz, actors, and a 
nurse, Lois Gilbert, were arraigned before 
Magistrate Sontheimer here last week 
charged with assaulting Ixmis Middleman, 
a tailor. The latter alleged that he had 
been told by Lois Gilbert to come to her 
home if he wanted to collect a bill of $35. 
He declared that. when he' came to her 
apartment she struck him and then called 
the actors to assist her in doing him bodily 
.damage. 

In defense, it was alleged that Middle- 
man, upon not receiving the payment of 
the $35, seized the nurse and attempted -to 
choke her. She declared that the acton, 
who were lodgers, replied to her calls for 
assistance and administered the beating to 
Middleman. 



MANAGERS AND ACTORS HOLD _ 
DISCUSSIO N AT SEC RET MEETING 

Representatives of A. E. A. Are Told that Manager* Will Not 

Do Business with Wilson or Mountford and That 

Otherwise They Will Fight the Thing Out 



RAISE "TOLLIES" ADMISSION 

Flo Ziegf eld has raised the price of ad- 
mission to the lower floor of the "Follies" 
at the New Amsterdam Theatre. Oh Mon- 
day of this week all orchestra seats were 
set at $3.50. Previous to this week only 
seats in the first ten rows were priced at 
$3.50, the remaining eight rows on the 
lower floor being set at $3 each. 

The uniform $3.50 scale which Ziegf eld 
is now charging for orchestra seats is the 
highest price now being asked for seats 
to shows of that class at any theatre in 
this country. The price is exclusive of the 
war tax, which adds thirty-five cents to 
the cost. 



DEMPSEY SIGNS FOR $15,000 
Chicago, 111., Aug. 1. — Jack Dempsey, 
the world's champion boxer, signed a con- 
tract at the Morrison Hotel, this city, last 
Wednesday, with Linnick and Jacoby, for 
fifteen weeks' -consecutive work with a 
vaudeville show at $15,000 per week. He 
is to get the money in advance, each 
week. 

Dempsey demanded the deposit of a . 
$250,000 bond in the Greenbaum Bank to 
_ bind, the contract, which is bf commence 
tSpkl tJMsf.wfll mtaiL; «£££>■ Aug. IS, The deal was put over by Jones, 
tie new theatres will pursue, ,,. l ££ u # ffia Schafer . * - ' 

...her any individual, group or cor- '""?""■ . ^w" 
notation is behind him in his plan to build 
a number of theatres throughout the 
country. ._" 

Interest . attaches to Mr. Erlanger's 
plans at this time by reason of the fact 
this is the first definite sort of announce- 
ment .he has -made with regard to his fu- 
ture theatrical activities- since it became 
known that he is no longer engaging in 
joint theatrical enterprises with his erst- 
while partner, Marc Klaw. 




LOEW IN OIL DEAL 
Four Worth, Tex., Aug. 2.-^John W. 
Considine, the theatrical manager, has 
formed a new oil combine here in which, 
it is rumored, Marcus Loew, the vaudeville 
magnate, is largely interested. Considine 
is on his way to New York after pur- 
chasing 3389 acres of the Banger fields. 
Others associated with Considine are J. 
Martin, of San Francisco, Phil Ohlnn, 
George Wmgfield, Sutro Brothers and sev- 
eral other well known financial men. 



AC QUIT AL' " GOING WEST 

"The Aeanital," the Cohan and Harris 
melodrama which opened at Atlantic, City ■ 
recently, will not come to -New York' early 
this season, as was originally intended. The 
show, after a few weeks on the road, wQl 
be sent to Chicago, where it will be 
opened for an indefinite ran. At the 
elusion of the Chicago engagement, 
piece will be brought to New York. 
Lillian Tucker has left the cast and has 
been replaced by Ann Mason. . 



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DEAD ACTOR COMES TO LIFE 

San Fbahcisoo, Aug. 2.— Carlton 
Chase, who has been touring India and 
has Just returned to- this city, surprised 
his many friends, who had thought him 
dead. A report to that effect had : reached 
America, and his death was reported in 
the news. ':'.■■• 



ACKERMAN TO PUT ON REVUE 

Sis Frahcibco, CaL, Aug. 2.— Irrinx 
Ackerman, of Ackerman and Harris, is 
back in town after a four weeks' stay fn 
New' York, where he contracted for a big 
revue to appear at the Casino in September. 



ARRESTED FOR BURGLARY 

Bah Fbahcisoo, Gal, Aug. 3.— Fred 
Adams, appearing In "An American Ace," 
has been arrested here on complaint of 
C. R- Kingdom. He is charged with having 
entered the letter's room and stealing' sev- 
eral articles of jewelry from his trunks. 
He is also under arrest for raising a thirty 
dollar check to eighty doUare, 



A secret meeting waa held in the office 
of Sam H. Harris on Monday afternoon 
between, representatives of the producing 
managers' association and a selected group 
of members of the Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion to take up the. natter of adjusting 
the existing differences between the two 
organizations. This is the first of a aeries 
of meetings which are to be held. 

Sam Harris, William A. Brady, Arthur 
Hopkins, Morris. Gest and John L. Golden, 
represented the managers' association, and 
on behalf of. the actors'- organization, Don- 
ald Brian, Bruce MacBae, vice-president 
of the A. B. A.; Frank Gillmore, Grant 
Stewart, Brandon Tynan, Charles Cobnrn, 
De Wolff Hopper and Howard Kyle were 
present. The latter was there upon the 
invitation of the managers. . 

The meeting is said to have been an in- 
formal one, and the managers discussed the 
situation fully with their visitors. They 
informed them that they were willing to 
do business with the' Actors' Equity, but 
under- no circumstances would they do- 
business with Francis Wilson, president of . 
the A. E. A., or with the association as 
long as Harry Mountford was in any way 
associated with it. They informed the call- 
era that the organization must disentangle 
itself from the A. A. A. A. Not Oat they 
objected to labor in any way, as they had 
gotten along -with labor organisations, hav- 
ing had no trouble whatever with them in 
their theatres, hut if they were to do busi- 
ness with them the A. E. A. might invoke 
the '''closed shop" rule, and in that, way 
keep from 'the 'theatrical field a good deal 
of talent which would otherwise find .in- 
gress into the profession. ' v 

They informed the callers that they did 
not approve of the tactics, employed in 
calling "mob" .meetings such aa were held 
at the Morrison Hotel, Chicago, on Sun- 
day night, and in the Hotel Aster last 
week. 

The managers then said that if the A. 
E. A. would come to the terms they re- 
quested they would gladly discuss the sit- 
uation with them and make a five-year 
contract with the organization which would 
be. iron-clad and that if any member of 
the association broke it they would forfeit 
a bond of $10,000. The actors were also 
told that the managers would pay them 
pro-ratio per performance based on their 
present earning capacity. Should. an actor 
get $100 a week at present for eight per- 
formances they would pay $12.50 a per- 
formance, and in case he played a Sunday 
or holiday matinee he would get paid in 
accordance. 

It was also suggested to the actors that 
their constitution and by-laws provided 
that at any time twenty members in good 
standing: could request a special general 
meeting for the purpose of transacting any 
imperative business. They were told that 

this matter was of considerable importance 
and' that it would warrant the calling of a 
special general meeting, at which to bring 
to the attention of the members the situa- 
tion as it existed with respect to the man- 



agers' attitude, and if the majority of the 
members were then willing to have the 
managers treat with the organization, ' 
minus Wilson, and renounce their affilia- 
tion with the A. A. A. A. they would be 
glad to immediately confer and draw up a 
new contract. 

The visitors said that they would take 
the managers' views under advisement and 
confer with them again later. 

Bnt, even though the managers were con- 
ferring with the few selected and repre- 
sentative members of the A. E. A, in an 
informal way it was learned that activi- 
ties were being directed toward the estab- 
lishment of a new organisation in opposi- 
tion to the A. E. a., and that daring the 
past few days more than COO applicants 
had applied for membership in the Actors' 
Co-Operative Association, which they con- 
template as the new rival organisation. It 
waa also reported that George M. Cohan 
had obtained a three-year lease on a floor 
in the premises at 109 West Forty-fifth 
street, where the new club rooms of the 
organization would be located. 

Sam Harris, when asked, stated that he 
knew nothing of the lease of the premises 
for a club room, bat was later Men hover- 
ing about the premises with Morris Gest, 
making inquiries sbout the building and 
the work being done there. 

Another- step the managers made os 
Monday waa to appoint William A. Ovist*, 
manager of the Century Theatre, to a posi- 
tion, similar to ..the one Pat Casey holds 
with the Vaudeville i Managers' Protective 
A ssocia t i o n. Ovistt will assume this posi- 
tion in addition to his century Job and re- 
ceive a salary of $100 a week for the ex- 
tra work. 

It is likely that Oviatt will have a hand 
in the formulation of the plana for the 
new' acton' organization. It is planned 
that the new organisation win be a frater- 
nity for actors only. No player save one 
who has actually been engaged on the 
stage wul be accepted. The same rule will 
be applied also to set ream who desire 
admission. 

One of those who is in back of the new 
organization said that either Henry Miller 
or John Draw would be placed as tempo- 
rary chairman of the society until regular 
elections could' be held. It is figured that 
the names of these two representative ac- 
tors would carry much prestige among the 
rank and file of the actors. 

Mr. Miller recently resigned from the 
Actora* Equity Association, and it la said 
that Drew did likewise. However, mem- 
bers of his family deny this. Howard 
Kyle, who was reported as being one of 
the prime movers in the new organization, 
stated that aa yet he had not taken any 
inch steps, aa he was still a member of the 
equity organisation He stated that un- 
less the few leaders now in control of the 
'Equity tender their resignation without 
delay the majority of the leading acton 
and actresses who compose its members are 
prepared to Institute proceedings 
' - (Continued on pages 8 and 3*.) 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919. 



COMMUNITY SERVICE STARTING 
NEIGHBORH OOD TH EATRE CHAIN 

With Amsterdam and Central Opera Houses in Manhattan, 

Others, to the Number of 100, Will Be Established in Other 

Cities — War Camp Service Barking Idea at Present 



Five theatres in Greater New York and 
one hundred in the leading cities Of the 
United States, is the program outlined by 
the War Camp Gommnnity Service and 
the Community' Service, beginning in 
September. The houses in Manhattan 
will be the *™«*»ii?«m Opera Boose, now 
in operation; the Central Opera House, 
East Sixty-seventh street, and a negro 
theatre in the One Hundred and Thirty- 
fifth street section. In The Bronx, a 
house will be opened in the One Hundred 
and Forty-ninth street neighborhood and 
one in Brooklyn. One or two theatres in 
all of the larger cities throughout the 
country will also be operated. 

According to Marina McGuffey, who is 
at the bead of the entertainment depart- 
ment Of the War Camp Community 
Service, these places will be known aa 
theatre dabs. All of the entertainments 
to be supplied in these places will be 
under the direction and supervision of 
the most capable and experienced profes- 
sional stage directors and producers, At 
the present time, he has associated with 
him in this respect William 6. Stewart, 
stage director at the Hippodrome, who 
produced the Gilbert and Sullivan opera 
"Pinafore,'' that was presented at the 
Amsterdam Opera House last week with 
a cast of 300, including both professional 
and amateur performers. Francis Tyler, 
the light opera stage producer and 
director, is another aid, as is Wells Wat- 
son Ginn, a stock and motion picture 
producer and director. David Bispham is 
also associated with the project. 

In addition to these men, a score of 
prominent performers and producers have 
signified their willingness to place their 
services at the disposal of McGuffey. 

Under the auspices of the War Gamp 
Community Service, the project will be 
continued until January 1, 1020, when 

the Community Service- will take it in 
hand and cany on the work. 

At the present time, the entertainment 
is given to service men in uniform, ex- 
service men and their friends. However, 
in the future, after the army has been 
demobilized, the organization will cater to 
the "communities" in which their theatre 
clubs are located and afford those who de- 
sire all of the benefits of their theatre 
clubs. 

As Mr. McGuffey outlines the project, 
operas, light operas, musical comedies, 
dramatic and vaudeville shows will be 
presented. The talent to be used will be 
professional and volunteer entertainers. 
The: latter will be afforded the oppor- 
tunity of receiving training in their 
chosen branch of theatricals. Classes will 
be held each evening and, after each per- 
former has been sufficiently trained and 
rehearsed, he will be given his opportunity 
to appear at the community perform- 
ances. 

Another opportunity that will be a fea- 
ture of the plan of operation of the the- 
atre clnos. with respect to the style of 
show presented, will be the production 
and breaking in of musical shows and 
dramatic offerings written by authors 
whose work has not been given a hearing 
or showing by producing managers. All 
of the script these authors have will be 
submitted to McGuffey and, if it war- 
rants presentation, he will organize a 
company of professional and amateur 
talent for its presentation. He figures 
that, in this way, a great many unknown 
authors will be given an opportunity to 
have their plays and productions brought 
to the attention' of huge producers. A 
number of the foremost producers in Hew 
York have signified their willingness to 
co-operate with McGuffey in this respect. 

For this purpose, there are,, at present, 
each evening, rehearsing at the Amiter- 
^tw ft pasj l aaSs sfsj aSssw wsstl M0 aspirants 



to the stage and, from this number, the 
members of the casts to present the plays 
chosen will be selected. The Co mmuni ty 
Service will also present standard plays, 
many of them to be chosen- from the 
library of recent productions. 

Should a production be unusually suc- 
cessful in the Greater New York district, 
the members will be afforded an oppor- 
tunity of presenting it in other cities on 
the community circuit. For these produc- 
tions, specially adapted producers will be 
sent on from New York, with a few pro- 
fessional artists who will assume the 
principal roles in the piece. The balance 
of the cast will, of course, be made up 
from the members of the local stock com- 
pany. 

Then, another project which will be- 
come an institution with the Community 
Service will be the staging of spectacles 
and- pageants. These are to. be presented 
four or five times during the year in each 
city and their type is to be similar. For 
these from 350 to 1,000 people are to be 
used. 

To properly stage and produce the var- 
ious offerings, a big scenic studio will be 
put into operation where all the scenic 
and lighting effects and properties will 
be assembled. All of the productions are 
to be made in duplicate and triplicate, 
and should there be a desire in any of the 
cities to produce a play or opera at the 
same time it is produced in another place 
they will have the identical mechanical 
and property equipment forwarded to 
them. From this production shop all of 
the mechanical necessities will be forth- 
coming and shipped with quick dispatch. 
After their use, they will be returned, 
touched up and placed in stock until 
needed again. 

A costume shop will also be established 
with several professional stage costumers 
in charge of the designing and manufac- 
ture of wardrobe. This shop will open 
toward the end of August, and it is in- 
tended that the warrobe for a dozen pro- 
ductions be started on at once. 

Until January 1, the appropriation for 
the establishment and conducting of these 
places will be made by the War Gamp 
Community Service, but when that organ- 
ization ceases .its financial responsibility, 
the Community Service will take up the 
financial obligations. All of the theatres 
that are to be; used will be obtained at a 
yearly rental, -under a leasing plan. 

Each biiilding or "theatre : club™ will 
have, besides the theatre auditorium, re- 
hearsal rooms, athletic equipment and 
gymnasiums, writing roams, a library and 
a canteen. These features win all he 
distinctive and separate from the theatre 
project, ■ 

EX -SOLDIERS TO HAVE WEEKLY 

"The Home Sector" is the name of a 
new weekly magazine that will be 
launched early in September. It will 
cater -editorially to "the new civilian," 
that is, to ex-soldiers, sailors and marines. 
The magazine, which will be published by 
the Mdgway Company, is to be edited by- 
Harold W. Ross, who was editor of "The 
Stars and Stripes," the newspaper of the 
A. E. F. His Staff wffl consist of those 
who were associated with him overseas 
and wffl include Alexander Woollcott, the 
theatrical critic: WaUy, the cartoonist; 
J. T. Winterich, Steward Emery, and 
others. 



JIMMY LESTER LOCKED UP 
Jimmy I/ester, otherwise known as 
Joseph Lionel Lozier, a stage director and 
producer of vaudeville acts, was locked up 
in the Raymond Street jail, Brooklyn, last 
week, by the sheriff, on the order of 
Supreme Court Justice AspinalL of Brook- 
lyn. This step was taken upon the plea of 
his wife that he was about to leave the 
country and she would be destitute. 

In the application filed with the court, 
the wife said that everything was pleasant 
between herself and her husband until a 
year ago, when he left for England. When 
he came back in April, however, she 
charged that he brought* a strange woman 
with him who received all his attention, he 
even refusing to return to bis home, the 
wife alleged. When she refused to get a 
divorce he said be would go to England 

again with the woman, the wife alleges, 
and, when he actually secured' his pass- 
ports, she appealed to the courts for 
protection. 

After being locked up, Lester com- 
municated with his attorney, Harry Saks 
Hechheimer, and bail was placed at $1,000. 



AL FIELD'S OPENS STRONG 

Mansfield, Ohio, Aug. 2.— Al G. Field's 
new minstrel show opened to big business 
here and is in many respects better than 
the company's offerings of previous years. 
The show could be classed as a musical 
comedy within a minstrel atmosphere. The 
biggest feature in the production is a 
burlesque operatic afterpiece entitled, 
"Scrambled Opera, While You Wait," with 
a trio of comedians, Billy Beard, Lasses 
White and Johnny Healy carrying off the 
principal honors. ' 

The comedy part of the program is re- 
plete with hits at the events of the day, 
and a caricature on present-day . prohibi- 
tion is a big mirth-provoker. Others in the 
cast are : Ed Ewald, Jimmy Cooper, Doran 
Brothers, Henri Newer, Sam Mounter, 
Jack Richards, Elton Crepeau, Billy 
Church, Pat Rogers, Lloyd Gflber and. Don 
Palmer. 



SET "COME ALONG" OPENING 

"Come Along," 'which wffl play the K. 
and E. houses for thirty Weeks under the 
direction of Herman A. Moss will open at 
Easton, Pa., on Aug. 18. Included in the 
cast, in addition to Harry Bulger, who has 
the, lead, are Eulalie Jensen, Carrie Per- 
kins, Georgette du Parque, Olga Brooks, 
'Captain M. H. Biggs, Dan Dawson, Dan 
McNeil, John Neff, GaiUen Bogue, Sid 
Meyer and Edward MaUon. 



DOROTHY HIRSCH BREAKS ANKLE 

Dorothy Hirsch, manager of the vaude- 
ville department of The Morning Telegraph, 
'slipped and fell while stepping from the 
pavement to the sidewalk in front of the 
Claridge last week and broke her ankle. 
Picked up by friends, she was taken to the 
Polyclinic Hospital, where the (''injured 
limb was placed" in a. plaster cast 'and she 
was removed to- her home. There -she has 
been confined to' her bed ever since. 



FINAL GOULD DECREE ISSUED 

The final decree 1 'in the divorce .trouble Of 
Flo Lewis and Jay Gould was issued laat 
week when Harry S. Hechheimer. obtained 

~ from the Supreme Court a final decree for 
Miss Lewis, his. client. 'She got the cus- 

' tody of the two children. Both she and 
Gould, however, will be together in Herman 
TunbergVaot, "Chicken Chow Mein.". 



ESTABLISH A RECORD 
The company playing "Dp in Mabel's 
Boom" .at the El tinge is called the ideal 
organization of the Woods office, not a 
member of the cast having lodged a com- 
plaint or having had to be "called" for 
anything since the piece opened several 
months ago.-. ..." .-. ■:._. 



• GERMANS GETTING BUSY 

That four .separate groups of German 

individuals arc planning to present opera 

and plays in their native tongue during 
the coming season in various theatres 
throughout the city, became known early 
this week. 

Grete Meyer, the German actress who, 
before this country entered the war, was 
one of the featured players in the Irving 
Place Theatre Stock Company, has, it ia 
reported, leased Daly's Theatre, on Broad- 
' way near Thirtieth street, where she plans 
to open early next Fall, presenting a rep- 
ertoire of plays in German. Her tenancy 
depends on the removal of a violation 
against the building which has been filed 
by the Building Department. 

Another group, consisting of Christian 
Rub, Hans Unterkircher, Ernest Mario w 
and Rudolph EybiBCh, all of whom were 
formerly connected with the Irving Place 
Theatre Stock Company, has practically 
completed negotiations with the present 
Jewish management of the Irving to 
take over that house, beginning next 
month, for a season of plays in the Ger- 
man language. The plan is for the Ger- 
man players to use the Irving during the 
first three or four days each week, the 
Yiddish players u*ing it the last three 
days in the week. 

Rudolph Christians and Dr. Otto 
Winter, both of whom have been asso- 
ciated with the Irving Place Theatre in 
the days before the war, the former as 
director and the hitter as business man- 
ager, are looking for a theatre in which 
they plan to present dramatic plays in 
German daring the coming season. They, 
it became known laat week, have been 
negotiating for the' Lexington Theatre. 
This house cannot be rented at this time 
because it has already been rented to a 
corporation organized for the purpose of 
presenting grand opera in German there 
during the coming season. 

This corporation is known as the Star 
Opera Company, and the principal organ- 
izers are Christian Rebhan, said to be the 
owner of a lunch room at 646 Sixth ave- 
nue, and Otto Goritz, former principal in 
the Metropolitan Opera Company. Their 
season of grand opera in German is 
scheduled to begin some time next month, 
and, already, they have deposited $1,500 
with George Grundy, lessee of the Lexing- 
ton Theatre, as an earnest of their inten- 
tion to go through with their plans. They 
are also selling stock at $26 a share in 
the corporation organized . to . present 
grand opera at the Lexington. 
. It is quite probable that the Shuberta 
win be the first American producers to 
present a new play from the German, for 
they are reported to have commissioned 
Gustave Amberg, builder of the ..Irving 
Place Theatre, who sailed for Germany 
about two weeks ago, to acquire , German 
and Austrian plays for them. Amberg is 
scheduled to return from. Germany early 
next FalL ... 



"TAKE IT FROM ME" REOPENS 

A-dlantio Orrr, July 3L — "Take It from 
Me," the Joe Gaites show which was seen 

last spring at the Forty-fourth Street The- 
atre, New York,' opened here this week at 
the Globe, and has been well received. 
There have been several changes made in 
the cast since the show moved from New 
York, the most notable one being that of 
Zoe Barnetf s replacing Vera Michaelena 
in the leading role. The reft of the cast 
is as follows: Fred Hildebrand, Douglas 
Leavitt, the Gardiner Trio, Arline, Helen 
and Edgar, James Dyrenforth, Ruth Mary 
Lockwood, William Balfour and Alice 
Hills. 



MAY YOHE ENTERING FILMS 

Los Angeles. Cal., Aug. 4. — May Yohe, 
the former Lady Francis Hope, now the 
wife of Captain Andy Smuts, formerly of 
South Africa, has signed with one of the 
large local picture concerns to star in a 
big motion picture production. 



SUED FOR DIYORCE . 
Felix W. Bernhardt, of the Vaudeville 
.team of . Bernhardt and Duffy, was sued 
hut week for divorce, on the. grounds of 
desertion by Geraldine C. Bernhardt, The 
action was begun in Ohio and Bernhardt 
is putting in an answer through Harry 
Saks Hechheimer. * 



WILL KING OPENS NEW REVIEW 

San Francisco, Aug. L— Will King 
opened in his new review, "Sweet Pa- 
tootie" here last Sunday at the Casino, 
with the following cast: Will King, Lew 
Dunbar, Reece Gardner,' 'Arthur Van 
Sly ke, Jack Wise, Harry Davis, Claire 
Stan-, Vera Ransdale, Honors Hamilton 
and Addle Beet. . = .',;. 

The vaudeville portion of the show con- 
sists of Toy Ling Foo, Monsieur Boila and 
Company,- Jones and Johnson, Three Span- 
ish Goldinis, Marshall and Kegel and 
Talbert and Fisher, ■/".;.-.' 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



MARGOLIES TO BUILD FIVE 
NEW THEA TRES IN MANHATTAN 

Shuberts Have First Call on All, Arthur Hammerstein and Oliver 

Morosco Being Reported as Two Aides 

Who Want Houses 



Edward Margolies, who has built more 
than 810,000,000 worth of theatres for the 
Shuberts during the last six years, will 
begin operations within the next three 
months on five new theatres in Manhat- 
tan, each of which the Shuberts will have 
the first chance of leasing, that being the 
arrangement under which Margolies 
works with the Shuberts. He chooses the 
sites, acquires the property in his name, 
builds the theatre, and then turns it over 
to them if they see fit to take it, or -else 
leases it to somebody else if the Shuberts 
don't deem the house useful for their 
purposes. 

At the southeast corner of St. Nicholas 
Avenue and 170th Street, Margolies will 
build a 1,500-seat i theatre, which the Shu- 
berts have already agreed to take over, 
adding it to their Subway Circuit. The 
site has a frontage of 125 feet on St. 
Nicholas Avenue and is 100 feet deep. 

From the Knight Estate, Margolies re- 
cently acquired the property at 211-227 
West Forty-ninth Street, adjoining the 
Brill Brothers' store, which he took under 
a twenty-one year lease, with four re- 
newal periods after the expiration of the 
initial term. This site, which is now oc- 
cupied by rooming houses of the red and 
brownstone type, is 125 by 100. The mat- 
ter of this lease is now in the Supreme 
Court, where an application has been 
made on behalf of some of the heirs, who 
are minors, for permission to consummate 
. the deal. This is purely a perfunctory 
matter under the law, permission being 



granted by the court unless it clearly ap- 
pears that those acting for the minor ' 
heirs are doing something foolhardy or 
unreasonable. And just as soon as the 
Supreme Court gives its approval to the 
deal, Margolies will begin building opera- 
tions. 

Two weeks ago, Margolies acquired 
from the Astor Estate, property at 227 to 
239 West Forty-fifth Street, adjoining the 
Morosco Theatre, and the abutting prop- 
erty on West Forty-sixth Street. Title 
to this property will be taken by Margo- 
lies on the 18th of this month, and within 
sixty days after he takes title he will 
begin demolishing the houses there to 
make room for three theatres which he 
will build on the adjoining sites. On the 
Forty-fifth Street site he will build a 
1,700-Beat house; on the Forty-sixth 
Street site he will build two theatres, 
one to contain 1,500. seats and the other 
1,000 seats. 

At least two of these three theatres 
will probably be sub-leased by the Shu- 
berts, Oliver Morosco and Arthur Ham- 
merstein being mentioned as the sub- 
lessees. These two producers are now 
booking through the Shuberts and one of 
the conditions of sub-leasing ' a theatre 
from the Shuberts is that the sub-lessee 
must book through the Shuberts, and 
should he have no show to book, the 
Shuberts themselves are to have first 
choice on the house with one of their 
own productions, of which they are plan- 
ning a great number. 



"SUNRISE" GOES OVER 

ABBUBT Pabk, N. J., Aug. 2.— Smith 
and Golden have a real hit in "Sunrise," 
a new "home life" play by Pearl Franklin 
and Klia Pest tie. The play is built around 
the life of some southern mountain folks, 
and tells of their loves, hates, feuds and 
religious beliefs. A "shouting preacher" is 
one of the principal characters and a fiery 
mountain maid is heroine of the piece. 

Smith and Golden tried this play out 
last year, but -found it unsatisfactory. So 
they had it revised, restaged and recast, 
and the result is a hit. The play is 
headed for Broadway. 

The cast includes Arphoni Ethier, Ben- 
jamin Kauser, Wilson Day, Charles Al- 
thoff, Charles McDonald, Leila Bennett, 
Sylvia Field, Marion Kerby, Win. H. Pos, 
Guy Nichols, John Talbert, Blanche Tal- 
bert, Chester Morris, Horace James, Era 
Dennison, Mane L. Day. 



FRAZEE SUED FOR PRINTING 

Two judgments, one for $162.05 and the 
other for $305.70, were recovered last 
week against H. H. Frazee in the Third 
District Municipal Court. The actions 
were brought by Leonora Malbin, as as- 
signee of the Tooker Printing Company 
Through her attorney, Herman Kahn, she 
claimed that Frazee failed to pay for 
printing "matter he ordered during 1016 
and 1916 for "A Full House" and "A Pair 
of Queens," which he produced during the 
years mentioned. 

\ 

BUSINESS ON COAST GOOD 

Sam Feancisco, Cal., Aug. 4. — The two 
big booses here have both been doing such 
a record' breaking business with their 
present attractions that, in each case, the 
run has been extended. At the Columbia 
Theatre "Moliere," with. Henry Miller and 
Blanche Bates as co-stars, has been re- 
tained for three weeks more and possibly 
a fourth, while "Tea for Three," at the 
Curran Theatre, will play two weeks more 
than was originally contemplated. 



"ONE-A-MINUTE" LOOKS FAIR 

Washington, July 30.— Fred Jackson, 
author of "The Naughty Wife," "The Vel- 
vet Lady," and ,; La, La, Lucille," 
launched his newest play, "One-A-Minute," 
here this week at the Shnbert Garrick. He 
presented his play through the Garrick 
Players' stock company. George P. Mar- 
shall and L. M. Bell, backing the Garrick 
enterprise, are said to be interested. 

Jackson- has, apparently, stretched the 
limits of even so liberal a medium as farce 
in drawing several of the characters in his 
new play, which sets forth the story of a 
youngster who, failing in law, saved the 
drug-store business of a girl playmate by 
inventing a patent medicine'' which met 
with' - instantaneous success and enabled 
him and the girl to successfully buck the 
drug-store trust- that was trying to run 
them out of business. 

The effect of the remedy, "Knight's 99," 
is magical. It cures all they try it on. 
Some splendid comedy opportunities are 
thus created and were this the sole test 
of the vehicle, it might be said to be a 
hit. The first act, however, is intermin- 
ably long and will have to have nearly 
forty-five minutes cut from it. The- second 
act is smashing in its motivation and 
climax. The romantic possibilities, only 
latent in their present form, will have to 
be developed. 

Lynne Overmann, scheduled for a role 
. in a forthcoming musical show and one of 
the luminaries of the present Garrick stock 
-galaxy, had the leading role, with Eileen 
Wilson in the chief feminine part Mrs. 
Jacques Martin scored in an extremely 
overdrawn character and a number of less- 
er players appear to great advantage. 
•• By the end of the present week, it is 
believed Jackson will be able to definitely 
ascertain just whether or not he has a 
success. - The reception accorded the piece 
was excellent, considering the heat. 



ARRESTED AS SHOPLIFTER 

Saw Fkanciboo, Cal., Aug. 2. — Mrs. 
Ella Greene, who claims to. be a Hun- 
garian actress, has been arrested by oper- 
atives of- one of the big Broadway stores 
here, for shoplifting. She had $9 worth 
'of goods concealed about her person. 




ACTORS "PINCHED" IN CRAP GAME 

"Come on, you Lonely Romeo. Coma 
on! Keep stepping!, What's the matter, 
ain't you ever comin'T" 

Then, slam bang! and. five husky cop* 
smashed in the doors at 162 West Fifty- 
sixth street to see Who "Lonely Borneo" 
was. 

He was just a pair of purple colored 
dice which had not responded, for the 
police picked up a nice wad of money, aa 
well as about forty prisoners, among 
whom were included a good many actors. 
' According to the police, they had been 
listening at door cracks to the pleas of 
the players in a crap game. 

Some of the sounds besides "Lonely 
Romeo" heard were: "Oh, you Scandals of 
1010, you sure have made a scandal for 
me. I'm just clean, that's all." "For 
the sake of Harriet, break or she will 
break my neck. Come on, you eight." 
Then the police started their dirty work. 

In so doing they coralled Willie Solar, 
twenty- nine years old, of 105 West 
Forty-third street, actor with "A Lonely 
Romeo"; Sam Ward, thirty-one, aetor of 
242 West Fifty-second street; Robert 
• Higgins, actor, Hotel Pennsylvania; Mau- 
rice Small, actor, 1971 Maple avenue. 
Bronx; Benj. Ryan, thirty- two years, 001 
West One (tee Hundred and Eighty-fourth 
street, actor, of the vaudeville team of 
Ryan and Lee; Bert Hanlon, twenty-nine 
years old, 148 West One Hundred and 
Seventeenth street, actor with George 
White's "Scandels of 1919"; Sam La 
Traunik, thirty-two years old, 149 West 
Forty-ninth street, vaudeville actor; 
Frank Goldie, actor, twenty-six years old, 
of 116 West Forty-fifth street; Irving 
Freedman, twenty-six years old, salesman, 
245 West Fifty-first street; Harry Ed- 
munds, twenty -two ' years old, actor, 342 
West One Hundred and Sixteenth street; 
Joseph Taylor, actor, 248 West Forty- 
sixth street; Frank Conway, actor, 107 
West One Hundred and Ninth street; 
Frank Saidi, actor, 350 West Thirty-ninth 
street, Sam Schwartz, thirty-one years 
old, actor, 319 West Forty-eighth street, 
and Harry Cohen, actor of 172 West 
Thirty-eighth street, as well as a score of 
tile layers, salesmen, steamfitters, 
laborers chauffeurs and newsboys. 

The prisoners were all taken to the West 
Forty-seventh Street Police Station, 
. where they were booked early Sunday 
morning. They were compelled to remain 
in the dutches of the police until court 
time in the morning, when they were ar- 
raigned before Magistrate Tobias, in the 
West 54th Street Police Court, and dis- 
charged. 



BRUNTON SUES ZIECFEJLD 
Flo Ziegfeld is being sued by John Bran- 
ton, manufacturer of stage properties. 
The suit is now pending in the Third Dis- 
trict Municipal Court, where Brunton Is 
seeking to recover $154.15 which, be 
claims, is due him for materials provided 
for "Pigeon Post," the play which Zieg- 
feld unsuccessfully' produced last season. 
Ziegfeld, through his attorneys, Ditten- 
hoefer and Fishel, has filed a counter-claim 
against Bmnton in which he seta forth 
that the latter is indebted to him to the 
extent of $8,300. He claims that in Janu- 
ary, 1918, he stored $15,000 worth of cos- 
tumes, scenery and other p i' upeity in 
Brun ton's place at 226 West Forty-first 
street. When the property was returned 
to him, be found a lot of stuff missing, he 
alleges, among it being two miniature 
paintings of his wife, Billie Burke, and a 
number of costumes. 

Ziegfeld, therefore, aaks the court to 
decree that he is entitled to his counter- 
claim against Brunton and for a judgment 
of $1,000, which amount is the limit that 
may bo allowed as a judgment in the 
Municipal Court For the balance, Zieg- 
feld would have to sue in the Supremo 
Court. - 



LOUISE LEIGH . 

With George White's "Scandals of 1919" 



SHUBERTS HAVE "THE TRICKSTERS" 
The Shuberts, through Sanger and Jor- 
don, last weak acquired the producing 
rights to a, new play written by Frederic 
Arnold Hummer called "The Trirkstresa," 
a modern drama in three acts. They pin 
to produce the play some time in October. 
Knmmer, who Bess in Baltimore, Md, 
spent several days hero last week. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 



STAGE HANDS FORM SOCIAL 

CLUB FOR M EN ON ROAD 

Establish Quarters on Eighth Avenue for die Theatrical Road 

Men's Association—Organization Already Has 200 Members 

and Expect* 1,000 Within Year— Dues $10 Per Year 



After seven unsuccessful attempts to 
organize, extending over a period of fif- 
teen years, members of the I. A. T. 8. E. 
■nd M. P. O. of the United States and 
Qjgsgia, have organized a social clnb, 
which was legally Incorporated last week 
and is now occupying quarters in the 
building at 678 Eighth avenue. It ii 
called the Theatrical Road Men's Asso- 
ciation. The members of the so-called 
Stage Hands Union, eligible as members 
in the new organization, are only such 
as are in good standing in the anion. 
The new organisation is designed to 
serve merely as a sort of social adjunct" 
of the union. 

The new club has a membership total- 
ing 200, each of whom pays $10 a year 
dues. With approximately $380 in the 
treasury, $10 from each of the thirty- 
eight original members, the organization 
last May engaged and furnished the 
quarters which they are at present occu- 
pying. 

The following members have been elec- 
ted to serve as officers for one year from 
last July 2: Barney Brill president; Dan 
Carey, rice-president; Abe Oowan, secre- 
tary and treasurer. The trustees are Cbn 



Hitzert, Fred Thomas and Ford Record. 
The house committee consists of the fol- 
lowing:- Joe Lot her, Dan Carey, Abe 
Cowan and J. E. Ferguson. The ser- 
geants-at-arms are Arthur Digman and 
Frank Croos. 

Abe Cowan, one of the club's organ- 
izers, an electrician employed with "Oh, 
What a Girl" show, at the Shnbert The- 
atre, stated last week that he expects 
to see the club's membership increase to 
at least 1,000 within a year. He ex- 
plained that there are about 3,000 road 
men throughout this country and Can- 
ada who are members of the Stage 
Hands Union and, of this number, he 
expects at least one-third to join the 
new social organization. 

It was further explained that the ad- 
vantages road men will derive from the 
Theatrical Road Men's Association are: 
They will have a permanent gathering 
place here, a definite place at which, mail 
mayt be received, ana, should the mem- 
bers, be unable to pay their dues in the 
union, as the result of sickness or lack 
of employment, this new organization 
will advance money to them for that pur- 
pose. £ 



DEFENDS THEATRE PATRONS 

Saw Francisco, Aug. 4. — 8am Blytbe, 
who last week made, a statement to a local 
newspaper to the effect that since the ad- 
vent of prohibition, the people, having leas 
alcohol within them, would turn from lirl 
shows to the lofty drama, has received a 
reply from Henry Miller, now playing an 
engagement in this city. ' 

Miller's statement in the columns of the 
same sheet gives vent to the expression 
that the demand for salacious shows is not 
an alcoholic demand, bat a natural one. 

"Here, at least, is one thine for which 
boose la not responsible,'' thinks Miller, 
Who says that, the "discr imin at ing minor- 
ity" will now have more time to turn to 
the theatre and demand better plays. 

Miller remarked that a very minute frac- 
tion of one per cent of the people visiting 
theatres do so while under the influence of 
intoxicating beverages, according to his 
observations. , ih 

CANT STOP "CIVILIAN CLOTHES" 

Los AKoxtaa, Aug. 4, — "Civilian 

Clothes,'* the Oliver Morosco piece which 
opened here five weeks ago, and which 
Morosco is rehearsing for a Broadway pre- 
sentation in New York, and originally put 
on for a run of one week only has been 
doing such good business that it has been 
held over from week to week. The play is 
playing to capacity business constantly. 
Clyde Fillmore playa the leading role, 
which he took when Morosco called Thur- 
ston Hall to New York to originate the 
character there. The leading lady ia 
Eleanor Woodruff and the rest of the cast 
includes Harlan Tucker, Alfred Whitman, 
Boscoe Earns, Lillian Elliott, Dora May 
Howe, Joseph Bggenton, Eloise dement, 
James Oorrigan, and Harry Duffield. 



MAC CREGOR SIGNS UP NEWMAN 
Alfred Newman, the 18-year-old pianist, 
composer and musical director, was last 
week placed under a two-year contract by 
Edgar MacGregor, the producer. 

MacGregor, with the consent of -Vic- 
tor Herbert, plans to appoint young New- 
man musical director of the musical 
adaptation of The Road to Yesterday," 
muakalized by Anne Caldwell and Victor 
Herbert, and which will be called The 
Dream. Girl" when it is presented here by 
MacGregor in association with A. L. Er- 
langer. 

Newman, until three weeks ago, was 
musical director of the "Sunshine" show, 
running at present in Chicago. Before 
joining that show he wielded the- baton 
with May Irwin's "Water's Fine—" show. 
Before that he played the piano in vaude- 
ville, appearing with several headline acts, 
including Grace Lev' Rue, Lois Josephine, 
Tyler Brooke and Joan Sawyer. 

Newman is considered the youngest 
musical director in America. Hi* playing 
has been praised by many of the best 
musical critics in America. 



DROP SUNDAY PERFORMANCES 

SAN Fbanciboo, Aug. 4.— Henry Miller 
and Blanche Bates, playing an engagement 
in "Moliere" here at the Columbia are not 
giving any Sunday performances, a custom 
which ia common on the coast and followed 
by practically every manager. 



SUES FOR $75,000 
The Interborough Rapid Transit Com- 
pany has been sued for $75,000 by the 
William T. Keough Amusement Company 
for alleged damaged to' the National The- 
atre Building on Bergen, and Westchester 
avenues. It is claimed that $20,000 dam- 
ages and $60,000 in depreciation of the 
property resulted from the erection of the 
elevated structure on Westchester avenue. 
A permanent injunction Is also de- 
manded, it being alleged that the Inter- 
borough When it constructed and- main- 
tained the present structure, violated the 
law. The amusement company recovered 
damages a few months ago when Gerard 
street, on the south side of the build in g, 
was closed 



JOLSON WANTED AN INTEREST 

Al Jolsoa attended the premier* of Tin 
Golden Age'' in Atlantic City last week, 
and was so impressed with it that he of- 
fered George C Tyler $25,000 in caah for a 
one-third interest. 



KELLY SUES FOR DIVORCE 

San Fbakcibco, Cal., Aug. 3. — Chester 
Kelly la suing Myrtle Dingwell, a musical 
comedy actress, for divorce, claiming de- 
sertion. He alleged she left him to appear 
as sMsRlg lady for the Banvard Musical 
Comedy company now touring the Orient. 

CARTER GOING TO ORIENT 
San Fbahcisco, Cal., Aug. 4.— Carter, 
the mfgir*?", who is booked for an Oriental 
tour, is filling in time by replacing- vaude- 
Tflle ahow, here and in Oakland. 



MULLER ENTERTAINS SCRIBES ; 

The "Forty Thieves," as Ben At well 
described them, ' or otherwise, the theat- 
rical newspapermen and press agents of 
the Broadway theatres, were entertained 
at' an informal dinner given by the J. P. 
Muller organb-ation at Murrays last Wed- 
nesday evening. The reason for the af- 
fair is perhaps best expressed by Muller 
himself, when he said: 

"I do not know of any particular rea- 
son why I invited you Doye, outside of 
the fact that I bought $12 worth of new 
furniture for my offices and thought it 
should be 'wetted.' " It was. 

The affair was a sort of reunion of the 
boys of the street, and hardly a more rep- 
resentative group of members of "our set" 
have ever been Drought together for any 
such occasion. ■ Frank Hughes was on 
hand to welcome all as they arrived, and 
other members Of the agency assisted him 
and J. P. entertained until dinner was 
served 

After the boys had broken bread, Ar- 
thur Ryan, acting as "pestmaster" called 
for a few. words from Ben Atwell, Wells 
Hawkes, Charles Emerson Cooke, Edward 
Earl and the "Boss." The speeches were 
all of the short variety and seemed to 
meet with the approbation of the "mob." 

However, the boys were interested in 
entertainment, and they called upon 
Hughes to "trot forth" his talent. Gilda 
Gray, of the "Scandels of 1910," was 
Called upon' to open the show. She was 
somewhat handicapped by her introduc- 
tion, but overcame this quickly and 
"shimmied" her way into favor quickly. 
Frieda Leonard, of the same organixation, 
gang a number of "blue" selections typical 
of the old San 'Francisco cabarets and put 
them over with a "punch" that impressed 
nil. 

Marcelle Johnson, a concert singer who 
appeared through the courtesy of Ben At- 
well, scored the success of the evening 
with her rendition of .' classical songs. 

Frankie James, of "Peek-a-Boo" had 
the way paved for her by her predecessors 
on the program, and scored a big hit. 

"Bee" Palmer, who needed a little coax- 
ing on the part of Carroll Pearce and 
Freddie Schader "cut loose" and gave the 
boys her conception of the "shimmy." The 
crowd seemed to like it, for they insisted 
on more and more. 

Through the -courtesy of the B. F. Keith 
offices, Al Shayne, Henry Lewis, 'Ryan and 
Healy and Lew Lockett added to the en- 
tertainment. '. 

The menu gave prominent display to a 
sketch by Harry Hershfieid, featuring his 
pen-child Abe Kabibble. Below the draw- 
ing was this notice. 

"J. 'P. Muller and Company present 
for the first time in any restaurant, an 
annihilative, gastronomical ■ concoction, 
"The Evening Blowout," a drama of culi- 
nary criminology for the inner man, in 
ten courses, with a typical Murrayesco 
cast. 

•i "Lighting effects by 'Edison and 'Com- 
pany. . Knives, forks and spoons from 
Gorham. The management will not' be 
responsible for the. loss of hat checks or 
advertising space. •■■ Patrons expecting 
telephone calls should' have their 'phone 
connections . removed." " , '.' ■ t . . 

Each item on the menu itself, which 
was described as "piste matter" carried 
with it a catch.line taken from advertis- 
ing verbage. - 

As the boys were departing each was 
the recipient of a novel and useful souve- 
nir, presented to them by Frank Hughes. 

GET ROUTE ON SUN CIRCUIT 

Solly's Shaw's Tip Top Girls, who 
closed at the Putnam Theatre, Brooklyn, 
recently, have been. routed over the Gus 
Sun Circuiti opening early in September. 
The musical comedy has been elaborately 
staged, carrying special settings and ward- 
robe. Edward Cantor and Bert Samuels 
are the featured performers. . . 



OLUE MACK TO BE STARRED 

OHie Mack, formerly of Murray and 
Mack, will be starred by Max Spiegel in 
a new musical play, "Til Say So," next 
season. The piece will open in September 
and will play K. and E. houses. George 
"Alabama * Florida win direct the tour 
of the company of thirty-five people. 



"GREENWICH FOLLIES" MOVING 

The Sbuberts have gathered the "Green- 
wich Tillage Follies" into their fold and, 
as a result, the show will move from the 
Greenwich Tillage Theatre : on Saturday 
night of this week, to open next Monday 
at the Nora Bsyes Theatre, atop the 44th 
Street Theatre. 

The show's change of location at this 
time is designed to get the capacity re- 
ceipts in the larger house uptown, for not 
only has the "Greenwich Tillage Follies", 
been playing to capacity in the little house 
in Sheridan Square, at $3.50 top, but the 
standees at each performance have aver- 
aged 160, these latter paying $1.50 each 
for the privilege. And on Monday night 
of this week, they totaled 190. The aver- 
age weekly receipts in the Greenwich since 
the. show opened there July IS have been 
upward of $10,000, an almost unprece- 
dented figure for a 374-seat house. 

At the Nora Bsyes Theatre, which the 
"Follies" management hag leased from the 
ShubertS for a minimum period, of tea 
weeks, with a like period renewal privi- 
lege, the seating capacity is 871. There is 
also room in the rear of the orchestra floor 
for approximately 300 standees, and, if 
the. show, plays to capacity at this house, 
as the management thinks it will in the 
light of its success further downtown, the 
receipts should total between $18,000 and 
$20,000 weekly. . 

Unless the owners of the . "Greenwich 
Tillage Follies" produce another musical 
show in the Greenwich Village .Theatre, 
the house will probably remain dark until 
next October, ten weeks, the Murray 
Anderson group paying the theatre's own- 
ers a weekly rental of $500 for the closed, 
period between now and October. For the 
owners of the show has the bouse "under a 
five-year lease, the period of occupancy 
ensuing between June and October of each 
year that the lease has to run. The rental 
is being guaranteed by the Pacific National 
Bank. . , 

Plans are now being perfected for a 
new musical play which John Murray 
Anderson will produce and for which A. 
Baldwin Sloane will compose the score, 
and, if the play is finished within the next 
week or two, it will immediately be placed 
in rehearsal at the Greenwich Village 
Theatre, where It win be. put on, if only 
for. a week, before the term of this year's 
tenancy expires, so that it may afterward 
be brought uptown with the stamp of 
Greenwich on it. This stamp, appears to 
be quite an asset for a new musical ahow, 
so much so, in fact,' that the Anderson 
group have no hesitancy in establishing a 
precedent - by opening a musical show 
"cold" there. ... 

The majority interest in the show is 
now owned, by Charley Levy and Al Jones, 
who are acting for Joe Leblang. And It 
would not be surprising if the latter, were 
acting for the Shnberta, >, Si] .'^ 

OUGHTS CRUISE NETS $7,500 

The. Lights Cruise, which came to its 
final landing at- Red Bank on Monday 
night,' has netted the club about $8,600, 
minus $1,000 for expenses. 

The cruise was put under way at Plain- 
field a week ago Monday, and stops were ' 
made each day at various ports, with, the 
exception of Sunday. It was originally 
planned to give » performance at the 
As tor Theatre, New York City, that night, 
but this was deferred until a date later 
this month. The entertainers will also, 
at that time, appear at Long Beach and 
play a return engagement at Camp Mills. 

Frank Tinney, who was in charge of the 
Cruise had a different group of actors ap- 
pear at each performance. -This was on 
account of the great number of club mem- 
bers -either being employed in local thea- 
tres or occupied in rehearsals of shows. 
However, at each -place visited twelve to 
fifteen acts appeared. • Last' Saturday 
night, at Far Rockaway, where the "Cruis-i 
era" played to $1,740, there was a show of 
twenty acts. ' 

E. F. Albee presented the club with his 
annual donation of $1,000. . 



NAN HALPFJUN IS SET 
Nan Halperin, it has been decided by 
the ShubertS, will be presented in "Girls," 
the musical version of the Clyde Fitch 
comedy, which opens this October. 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



PRODUCERS TO SETTLE OWN 
TROUBL ES BY ARBITRATION 

Disputes Over Services of Artists and Other Disagreements to 

Be Left to Committee — Kent-Hammerstein-Shubert 

Case First One So Adjusted 



Despite the fact that the Producing 
Managers' Association is unwilling to 
have their differences with the Actor's 
Equity Association passed upon by an ar- 
bitration committee, the Association, in 
its own ranks, has inaugurated a plan 
whereby its members are permitted to 
have their differences submitted to an ar- 
bitration committee. 

The first case to be arbitrated and set- 
tled was when Arthur Hammerstein 
brought to the attention of the association 
the fact that the Shuberts had placed 
under contract William S. Kent, when 
the latter was under contract to him. 

The matter was submitted at one of 
the meetings of the organization,- and 
after it had been threshed out, President 
Sam Harris told Hammerstein and the 
Shuberts that they could each select one 
man to act as an arbitrator for them and 



that the men they selected would' select 
an umpire. This was done, and when the 
decision by the arbiters was made the 
managers were satisfied to abide by it. 
It | takes, of course, a two-third vote to 
settle any question, with the umpire 
aiding with either arbitrator he believes 
to be in the right. 

■ At any time that the question of pri- 
ority to an artist's service may come up, 
the persons interested in the controversy 
will be at liberty, without applying to 
the organization, to arrange the appoint- 
ment of a committee. All members, 
after the decision is made, will have no 
other recourse but to abide by the de- 
cision. 

None of these matters are to be given 
any. publicity, and only the persons in- 
volved in the controversy will be privi- 
leged to attend the meetings of the ar- 
bitrators. • 



HILL FILLS ALL HIS CASTS 

Gub Hill has completed his arrange- 
ment of shows for the approaching sea- 
son, and they will include the following 
casts: "Mutt and Jeff" (Coast), Ross 
Snow, Marty Healy, Charles Cordon, 
Frank Lambert, Ethel Wynn, Helen Lane, 
Mrs. Marty Healy, Jack Hayes. 

"Mutt and Jeff" (EaBt), William Gard- 
ner, Jerry Sullivan, Harry Stephens, 
George Woods, Effie Pearson, Grace Han- 
son, Lizzett Fuller, Ned Radcllff. 

"Mutt . and Jeff (City), Harry Kay, 
Louis Market, Kenneth Gladstone,. Walter 
Mathews, Maria Van Nick, Jack Leiws, 
Olive de Grant, Ray Coleman, Gus Hill's 
Minstrels, George Wilson, Jimmy Wall, 
Jack Kennedy, Lee Edmonds, Herbert 
Willison, Fred Fredt, Carl Graves, Will- 
iam Hallett, Rudy Willing, Simon Denys, 
James Brennan, Jigger Marr, Johnny 
Buckely, • Bob Weston, Harold Williams, 
Jack Batter8by, James Brady, Eddie Gal- 
lagher, Three Musical Gates, Markwith 
Brothers. '.. 

,r Bringing Up Father" (Coast), George 
W. Milter, Josephine Sabel, Keiada and 
Carnier, George Belts, Mrs. C. E. Fore- 
man. Fred Roberts. "? 

"Bringing Up 'Father" (East), John 
CainVO.ydia' Keaim, Franklin and Merger, 
Eddft' Lehman,' 'Blanche NewconSb, 1 Robert 
J.Rjci; - " ' ' • •' ■ * 

"Bringing Up Father" (City), --SaBi 
Kelly, Dudley and Penard, John^ Russell, 
OBcar'-TJoyd, Lillian Goldsmith, Eugene 
May%r. ■; '■■•'_ ;u ;•' ' ,**£. 

" SHEP CAMP TO PRODUCE 
Frank Dupree and Shep Camp have or- 
ganized a producing corporation called 
Dupree and Camp Productions, Inc., 
through Harry Saks Hechheimer, with a 
capitalisation of $15,006, through which 
ttiey will produce a new three-act comedy 
with music called "Half a Widow." 

VEVTANS GET A ROUTE 

Winnepeo, Can., Aug. 4.— The Vevians, 
sharpshooters from across the border, have 
opened an engagement here that is the 
beginning of a tour of the Orphenm Cir- 
cuit. They are booked solid till June 
1920, over the big time routes. 

NEW ACT OPENS ON COAST 

San Francisco, CaL, Aug. 4. — Branson 
and Baldwin are showing a new act which 
they will ' play over the Orphenm time 
beginning August 31. The act is by Harry 
Lait, Harry Williams and Neil Morer, 

PRIMA DONNA GETS ROUTE 

San Francisco, CaL, Aug. 2.— lone Pas- 
tori, a local prima 'donna who made her 
first .vaudeville appearance at the Orphenm, 
has been booked over the circuit as a result 
of her success. 



REHEARSING WEBER SHOW 

Last Thursday, through an arrangement 
with Flo Ziegfeld, with whom he is under 
contract, Ned Wayburn began rehearsing 
"The Little Blue Devil," the musical 
adaptation of Clyde Fitch's "Blue Mouse," 
which Joe Weber is producing and which 
is scheduled to open September 7 in De- 
troit. Negotiations are now pending be- 
tween Weber and Ziegfeld. to have Lillian 
Lorraine, under contract to appear in the 
"Follies" and "Frolic" shows, appear in 
"The Little Blue DeviL" 

Way burn is rehearsing two shows. The 
other one is the new Ziegfeld "Nine 
o'Olock Revue," which went into rehearsal 
on Monday of this week, and which is 
scheduled to open atop the New Amster- 
dam Theatre August 18. Dave Stamper 
and Gene Buck wrote the new "Nine 
o'clock Revue"; Joseph Urban has de-. 
signed a new setting for the show, and 
Frances White is on her way back from 
London to head the cast. Other principals 
include Oscar Shaw, Allyn King and 
Yvonne Shelton. It was also announced 
that some of the best features in the 
"Midnight Frolic" will be taken out of 
that show and included in the earlier one. 

Beginning the. first of September, Way- 
burn will conduct intermittent rehearsals 
of the "Follies," preparing the show for 
its Boston engagement, where, it is slated 
to Open' the middle of October.". ... 

CABARET DRINKS HAVE OLD; KICK 

It's after: June 30, but you can still get 
a Manhattan cocktail on.Uroadway.orany 
other kind of drink, you 1 want, for. that 
matter.; The lid la~ loose in|>the Broadway 
cabarets and manyioCilthenk: are openly 
soiling hard. liquor of any and every va- 
riety following the opinion of the courts 
in favor of 2.75 beer rendered last week. 
That seems to have pried open the pro- 
hibition lid. 

The' opinion held that there is nothing 
to indicate that beer of more than one- 
half of one per cent alcohol and less than 
2.75 per cent is intoxicating, and Broad- 
way cabaret owners have decided that the 
opinion means more than that. 

WILL BURLESQUE ACTOR STRIKE 

The A. E. A. strike against Morris Gest 
and the "Chu Chin Chow" company will 
be the theme of a burlesque written by 
John Henry Mears, floor manager of the 
Century Grove. The piece will be pre- 
sented there tomorrow (Thursday) night, 
with Rosie Quinn and William and Gor- 
don Dooley playing the three roles. 

PLAYERS CLUB DROPS BAR 

.The Players*' Club is- the first of the 
theatrical clubs to turn in its license to 
dispense alcoholic drinks, thereby elimin- 
ating 'the serving of beer. 



WANT HAMMERSTEIN MEMORIAL 

With the object of erecting a fitting 
memorial to the memory of Oscar Ham- 
merstein, discussion as to a f avora flle loca- 
tion for it was begun e»x 
site that will, if any, be sa lec j o A j fwroiin 
a stone's throw of Forty-second "and 
Broadway in the heart of the district 
when the late impresario made his big 
successes. It was the proposal of Mor- 
ris Gest that such a memorial be erected. 

A death-mask of Hammerstein, which 
has just, been completed by Robert G. 
Ebernard, to stand over his grave may . 
be duplicated for the memorial monument. 

As a further tribute to the late impre- 
sario it .was also suggested that Longacre 
Square be re-named Hammerstein Square, 
in view of the fact that Hammerstein 
more than any other theatrical promoter 
was responsible for the ' development of 
that section. 

Years ago, .while other managers were 
dickering for sites below Thirty- fourth 
street, on Broadway, Hammerstein earns 
further uptown and, above Forty-second 
street, built the two theatres now known 
as the Criterion and New York. He also 
built the Victoria, now the Rialto, the 
Republic around the corner on West Forty- 
second street, and, going further west on 
the same street, what is now known a* 
the Harris Theatre. 



. COMING INTO PRINCESS 

A BRiiKY Park, Aug. L— "Nightie Night," 
the uproarious bedroom farce which 
Adolph Klauber presented here at the 
Savoy Theatre last night was today booked 
to open next Thursday night at the Prin- 
cess Theatre, New York. 

This farce, written by Martha M. Stan- 
ley and Adelaide Matthews, appears to 
be one that will find favor with metro- 
politan audiences, Adolph Klauber has, 
therefore, wasted no time in booking' the 
piece in New York. < 

When "Nightie Night" reaches the 
Princess Theatre in New York it will 
have the following roster of players: 
George W. Pierpont, Francis Byrne, Oscar 
Knapp, Cyril Raymond, Grant Mills, Mal- 
colm Duncan, Suzanne Wills, Marie 
Chambers, Dorothy Mortimer and Ruby 
Craven. 



FARE RAISE HURTS BOSTON SHOWS 

Boston, Aug. 4. — The greatly increased 
afreet car rates here have proven to be a 
heavy blow to theatres. Boston houses, 
which are patronized greatly by out-of- 
town people, suffered a heavy . loss of 
patronage after the increase in fares, 
which followed the recent strike, during 
which, no 'cars ran- for four days. The out- 
of-town houses are now getting the out- 
side ..patronage and. managers oJ these 
theatres are making great efforts to hold 
rfcsr' .;■ :■ '"■ ' ■-• :: { ' l, - ,- Meat! «•.. 



W1LLARD PAID $3 1 ,4 10 TAX 

The revenue taken in by the Govern- 
ment on, the Willard-Dempsey. scrap in 
Toledo on July 4 jumped considerable 
when the principals paid their income 
taxes. Willard was obliged to pay a 
normal tax of $7,840 and a surtax of $23,- 
750, making a- total of $31,410. Dempaey 
paid a normal tax of $2,040 and a surtax 
of $1,490, totalling $3,530. The Govern- 
ment had previously taken in well over 
$100,000 on admissions and 50 per cent of 
the gain by speculators. 

"AN INNOCENT IDEA" READY 

Charles Emerson Cooke is producing a 
new farce by Martin Brown called An 
Innocent Idea," in which Robert Emmet 
Keane and John Westley are to star. The 
piece is now in rehearsal with a cast that 
includes Jennie E. Euetice, Lillian Tucker, 
Marguerite Forrest, Ada Wingard, Dor- 
othy Tierney, Florence Gerald, Selma 
Hall, Helen Van Hoose, Elizabeth Alex- 
ander, Rene Johnson, Percy Jennings and 

Jack O'Brien. 



CORT TO BE BUSY 

John Cort has announced eleven produc- 
tions, including' tours, for next season. 
- First among his ventures will be the 
starring of Mimi Agnglia, the Italian 
actress, who win make her first appear- 
ance in English under his management. 

Then, "Just a Minute" will come, 
starring Louise Groody, Hal Skelley, 
Wellington Cross, Billy Clark, Harry 
Kelly, Merle HartweU and the Morin 
Sisters. Two road companies will present 
this piece also. 

Third, is "Roly Boley Eyes," with Eddie 
Leonard, May Boley, Mark Smith, Eddie 

Mazer and Quecnie Smith. "A Fool's 
Game," a new comedy by Crane Wilbur, 
with Maude Fealy as the star, is included 
in the list and May Vokes win be the 
star of "Three's a Crowd," which win be 
seen at the Cort in New York. 

Fritzi Scheff, with Al. H. Wilson In 
support, will resume her tour of "Glor- 
iana"; Tavie Beige and Thomas Oonkley 
win take to the road in "Fiddlers Three?' 
Last but not least, Banders and MiUis 
will take to the road in "Flo-Flo." 



MARC KLAW GETS ANOTHER PLAY 

Marc Ktaw has acquired a new four-act 
comedy from the pen of Delia MacCleod, 
a newspaper woman. The play 4s laid in 
the Latin quarter of a large city, and 
bears the title "Weaning a Husband.'' It 
is planned to produce it late in the season. 



HAVE PLAY CALLED "MIDNrGHT" 
A new corporation with a capitalisation 
of $3,000 has been organised to produce - 
"Midnight," a . three-act melodramatic 
comedy which was tried out two years ago, 
it then being presented by its former pro- 
ducers in Staten Island and Wilmington, 
Del. The corporation is called The Mid- 
night Amusement Company and the organ- 
izers are Charles, B. TT»»i m »> T .i»n y], Bn< j 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Delaney Dunn, the 
latter two having collaborated with the 
play's author, Bamuel Jenny, in revising 
it for presentation at this time. . 

"Midnight" is scheduled to open Septem- 
ber 1 in Rochester, N. Y., with Paulino 
Lord as the featured member of the east. 
Ira Hards is staging it 

MANTELL TO DO SHAKESPEARE 

Robert B. ManteU will be seen in 
"Julius Caesar" this coming season, the 
new production of that drama taking 
the place of the one which was completely 
destroyed in the fire in William A. 
Brady's storehouse two years ago. The 
new settings have been designed by Man * 
teU himself " 

Mantel], whose season will open on 
Sept. 20 at the Montauk Theatre, Brook- 
lyn, will also be seen in "As You Lake It." 
Genevieve Hamper and Fritz Lieber will 
be featured at matinees in "Romeo and 
Juliet." Man tell will be seen in "Ham- 
let," "Macbeth," "King Lear," "Othello,- 
"Mcrchant of Venice" and "Richard m" 
and other plays. 

HIP SHOW CALLED "HAPPY DAYS" 
"Happy Days" is the name of the next 
»how which wilfc he presented >st the Hip- 
podrome. R. H. Burnsidu, stage director, 
and Raymond Hubbel, .' , who ' wrote - the 
music, are jointly responsible for the new 
spectacle. Rehearsals have already been 
begun at the 71st Regiment Armory, 
music rehearsals being held in the Hippo- 
drome orchestra and ballet rooms. The 
interior of the Hippodrome is being com- 
pletely remodeled for the new production. 

"SCANDAL" CO. GOES ON ROAD 

Edward Rowland has organized a special 
"Scandal" company to tour the middle 
west. Lee Parrin is out ahead and wdl 
handle all business matters on the road. 
. The cast of the show is as follows i 
Walter Gilbert, Miriam Doyle, Smythn 
Wallace; Iska Murfl, Edward Pynter, 
Lillian Scaffner, Marie Curtis, Tom Rob- 
inson, Mary Hill and Betty Carter. 

REHEARSE "NAUGHTY LOVE BIRDS" 

"Naughty Love Birds" has gone into 
rehearsal and win open at the EUlnge, 
Sept. 1, under the A. H. Woods banner. 
Included in the cast are John Cumberland, 
Doris Kenyon, Charles Buggies, Zelda 
Sears. Claiborne Foster, Frank Foster 
and Barnett Parker. 



WILL HEAD 5TH AVE COMPANY 

Mae Melvin and W. O. MeWatera wtfl 
again head the Fifth Avenue Stock Com- 
pany when they open their season late in 
the faTL . r 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 



SHUBERTS PLAN TWO HUNDRED 
SHOWS FOR COMING SEASON 



MANAGERS AND ACTORS CONFER 

' '- (Continued from page 3 .) 



^asarsa 



With Allied Producers They Have Laid Out More Productions 
Than Ever Before in the Business; Shows of All 

Kind. Will Be Offered 

^ .-•-* 



More than two hundred attraction* ia 
the record the Shuberta want to bang up 
this season. These plana are unprece- 
dented, being the moat ambitious program 
ever planned by any producer. The pro- 
ductions win affect theatres throughout 
the United States as far West aa St. 
Paul, Minn., and will also take in many 
large cities in Canada. 

Of especial interest in connection with 
these plana are the revivals that are 
promised. The old tunes of "Floradora" 
will once again bid for popularity on 
Broadway shortly before Christ mas with 
an all-star cast. A Shakespeare revival 
is also on the Shubert prospectus for the" 
Forty-fourth Street Theatre, coincident 
with the return to the stage of Julia Mar- 
lowe and E. H. Sothern. The Shake- 
spearean repertoire will include "The 
Taming of the Shrew," "Hamlet," and 
"The Twelfth Night." Later Sothern and 
Marlowe will go on tour. 

"The Dancer," by Edward Locke and 
Louis EL Anspacher, is to go into rehearsal 
immediately, featuring Isabelle Lowe. 

Raohael Crotherg will appear in October 
in her new comedy, "He and She," and 
will be supported by Cyril Keightley, 

"The Honored Guest," which win serve 
as William Hodge's vehicle, ia picked by 
the Shubert s as one of the big hits of the 
coming season. 

The AI Jolson tour will begin in Phila- 
delphia early next month with "Sinbad" 
as the vehicle. 

"CaU a Tari," by Earl Carroll, heads 
the list of musical plays and will begin 
rehearsals shortly. 

Robert Louis Stevenson's "The Master 
of BaUantrae" has been dramatized by 
Carl Mason through arrangements with 
Lloyd Osborne and Walter Hast, and win 
star Walker Whiteside. Alma TeU wiU 
play in "The Third. Generation," by Har- 
old Heatou. Peggy Wood, is to have a 
double role in a play she has written with 
Samuel Merwin entitled, '""Youth Has 
Wings." 

Irene Fenwick is to be featured in a 
new play that has not yet been an- 
nounced. 

"Officers' Mess" is a London importa- 
tion which the Shuberts announce they 
win produce in conjunction with Charles 
Maddock. 

Cleves Kinkead, the author of "Common 
Clay," has written a new drama, "The 
Mood of the Moon," which win be pro- 
duced in October, as wiU "Raising the 
Mask," a melodrama by Bruce Reynolds. 

Of course, there win be a new W m * ;er 
Garden revue. Other musical shows will 
be "HeUo, Alexander!" "Mr. Manhattan," 
"Bal Tabarin," "Buzz, Buzz" (a London 
success), "Yesterday," an opera comique 
by Reginald DeKoven apd Glen MacDon- 
ough, and "Bene of TrouviUe," in associa- 
tion with LauriUard and Grossmith. 

Among the touring attractions will be 
"The Passing Show of 1918" "Monte 
Cristo, Jr.," "The Shubert Gaieties of 
1919," "Little Simplicity," Lew Fields in 
"Lonely Romeo," "Good Morning, Judge," 
with George HasseU; "A Sleepless Night," 
"Oh, What A Girl," "Maytime," "A Little 
Journey," "89 East" and "The Kiss Burg- 
lar." 

"La Griffe" and "Judith* by Henri 
Bernstein, with whom the Shuberta have 
a five-year contract, wUl see production 
this fall. 

A new operatic -work, "La Bene Helene," 
is promised an early production, under the 
direction of Richard Ordynski. 

"Yes, Uncle," a musical novelty, is also 
on the list. 

Other new plays accepted for immediate 
staging are "The School for Manners," by 
M. Arment and Cerbidge; "Clutch of Cir- 
cuniotances," from the novel by Maxjorie 
Benton Cooke; "His Wife," by Maurice 



V. Samuels, author of "The Wanderer"; 
"A Friend at Court," by Clinton Stuart; 
"The Dancin' Fool," by Henry Payson 
Dowst; "The Wicked Streak," by Edgar 
Franklin; ^Dangerous Years," by Edward 
Locke; "Those Who Walk in Darkness," 
by Owen Davis, from the novel by Hurley 
Poors. Sheehan; "Two's a Crowd," by 
Joseph Bernard Rethy; a spectacular pro- 
duction of "Susan Lenox,"- dramatized 
from the novel by David Graham Phillips 

Local attractions under the direction of 
the Shuberts are, or win be: Astor The- 
atre, "East Is West"; Maxine Elliott's, 
"First Is Last," Aug. 25; Comedy, John 
D. Williams* comedy, "Up from Nowhere," 
about Sept. 1; Central, Messrs. Mclntyre 
and Heath, in "Hollo, Alexander"; Bijou, 
Mr. Woods* production of "A Bashful 
Hero," Aug. 25; Shubert, "Oh, What a 
Girl"; Booth, "The Great niusion," early 
in September; Princess, "Nighty Night"; 
Forty-eighth Street Theatre, week of Aug. 
11, "Those WEo Walk in Darkness' 5 ; 
Lyric Theatre, "The Five Million"; Win- 
ter Garden, "Passing Show of 1919"; 
Forty-fourth Street Theatre, "Shubert. 
Gaieties of 1919"; Casino Theatre, "A 
Lonely Romeo"; Broadhurst, "The Crim- 
son Aubi"; Thirty-ninth Street, "The Red 
Dawn." 

In theatres here booked by the Shuberta 
are, or win be: Plymouth, John and 
Lionel Barrymore in "The Jest," early in 
September; Morosco, "Civilian Clothes,"- 
Sept. 1; Selwyn, "The Challenge"; Hud- 
son, "Too Many Husbands"; Vanderbilt, 
Miss Grace George in "She Would and She 
Did," Aug. 11; Harm, "The Dancer"; 
El tinge, "Little Love Brides"; Longacre, 
"Adam and Eva"; Fulton, "John Fergu- 
son"; Manhattan, "Friendly Enemies"; 
Century, "Chu Chin Chow"; Playhouse, 
"At 9:45." 

The producers allied with, the Shuberts 
for the coming season are William A. 
Brady, A. H. Woods, Arthur Hopkins, 
Selwyn and Company, Wintbrop Ames, 
OUver Morosco, William Elliott, Morris 
Gest, F. Ray Comstock, William Harris, 
Jr., George Broadhurst, Arthur Hammer- 
stein, Roland West, John D. Williams, 
Sanger and- Jordan, Joe Weber, Lawrence 
Weber, Lew Fields, George Anderson, 
Richard Walton TuUy, H. H. Frazee, Wal- 
ter Hast, William Morris, George Mooser, 
Nora Bayes, Rachel Crothers, E. H. Soth- 
ern, Robert B. Man tell, John P. Slocum, 
Stuart Wallter and Fortune Gallo. 



SWITCH TO ROAD SHOWS 

Baltimore, Md., Aug. 4. — The Colonial 
Theatre, under the direction of the Blaney 
Brothers, and which, for the last two 
years, has been presenting stock, win 
undergo alterations and redecorations and 
then a change of policy when the house 
opens on Labor Day. The attractions 
win be first class road shows, booked 
through the Blaney offiees in* New York 
and will be presented at popular prices, 
$1 being the top. i 

"LITTLE WHOPPER" REHEARSING 

"The Little Whopper," the Dudley- 
Friml-Harbach musical comedy, was placed 
in rehearsal Monday by Abe Levy with the 
following people in the cast : Vivien Seigel, 
W. F. Ferguson, Sidney Grant, Lynn 
Overman, Lottie Linthicum and several 
others. The piece will open at the Apollo 
Theatre, Atlantic City, the middle of 
September. 



SET OPENING OP NEW PLAY 

OUver Morosco has in rehearsal a new 
play caUed "Seven MUes to Arden," 
which win have its premiere in Grand 
Rapids on August 21. The piece will go 
into the Olympic, Chicago, following the 
Grand Rapids date. 



will separate these officers from their posi- 
tions very quickly. And for', that reason, 
he said, he had not withdrawn from the 
Equity, aa he had not lost hope of oust- 
ing these officials from the organization. 
He says that he ia not prepared to resign 
until aB efforts of the organization to rid 
itself of the undesirable members have 
failed. 

Kyle, said that the large majority of the 
Equity members, including himself, were . 
greatly dissatisfied with the way the affairs 
of the Equity had been conducted by Fran- 
cis Wilson, Frank Gillmore and Grant 
Stewart He said the members organized 
the society for the purpose of maintaining 
harmony with the managers. They were, 
therefore, very much dissatisfied with what . 
had arisen in the last few months. 

With respect to the new organization, 
Kyle said he would not take any interest 
in it until he had resigned from the Equity, 
to . which he had been a devoted member 
and servant since its inception. Continu- 
ing, he said: ' 

"I am hoping and praying that equitable 
arrangements may be reached by which the 
managers and the A. E. A. can continue 
in a co-operative spirit under a uniform 
standard contract. 

"More managers are united in the spirit 
of co-operation toward actors now than 
ever before, and it is a great pity, to say' 
the least, that this situation should not be 
embraced in faith and harmony. Whole- 
sale statements of condemnation against 
managers, without whose responsiveness 
our 'association could not have reached its 
present position, has engendered a spirit of 
resentment which was natural, much aa it 
is to be deplored 

"It ia an very well to be a fighter, but 
If s wise to know when to fight. I am 
for the course that wfll best maintain the 
standard that has been established for the 
business relations of our profession, and. I 
cannot believe that the one now being fol- 
lowed by some of the officers and council- 
men of the association is desirable. 

"A charge has been set forth that the 
managers refused to grant the demand that 
all legal holiday matinees and Sunday 
night performances in places where they 
are the established custom be paid for ex- 
tra. The managers were prepared at the 
time of negotiation and are prepared now 
to make a, provision in a mutually agreed 
upon contract that salaries should be reck- 
oned by the performance, but an ultima- 
tum bavins been precipitated by represen- 
tives of the A. B. A,, they refused to nego- 
tiate further. 

"The A. E. A. has accomplished wonder- 
ful good in a field where an effort similar 
to its own has never been made, and if s 
not to be expected that full obtainments 
should be reached in a day. If there's any 
human activity wherein mutual confidence 
and respect contribute to the results aimed 
nt. it is that of the theatre. With this in 
mind I stand ready to stick with the A. 
E. A., -but if methods of inharmony and 
physical coercion are to be pursued, then 
I shall adopt whatever way I consider best, 
in my judgment, to serve the cause to 
which I have been devoted most of my 
life." 

Mr. Kyle says that on Monday he' was 
told by Charles Richman and W. H. . 
Thompson that be had expressed the 
opinion of the representative members of 
the A. E. A., and they assured him that 
they would co-operate with him in this 
respect. 

Monday evening Gordon, Whyte, who is 
in charge of the A. E. A. publicity depart- 
ment, gave out the following letter which, 
he said, was -written by E. H. Sothern to 
Francis Wilson, August 1, from his home 
at Litchfield, Conn.: 

"At this crhus in the existence of the 
Actors' Equity Association, Mrs. Sothern 
and I wish to express, our sympathy with 
your request that the managers should 
consent to arbitration in the question of 
payment for extra holiday matinees. We 
are sorry that it becomes necessary to 
adopt extreme measures to enforce con- 
tinned recognition of the Equity Associa- 
tion, and we wish that the managers cortld 
have seen their way to co-operate with the 



association in all matters concerning the 
welfare of the people of our calling. 

"However, since pressure appears to be 
necessary, we believe that union with the 
American Federation of Labor is a proper'- 
and dignified way of procuring authority 
for your plea for- equity and fair dealing, 
a result which. surely will be to the ad- 
vantage of both actor and manager. 
"Sincerely yours, 
(Signed) E. H. Sotuebn." 

A letter which seemed, to have perturbed 
the managers somewhat was sent by Frank ' 
Gillmore to L.. Lawrence Weber, secretary 
of the Managers' Association, on Saturday 
evening. Points of this letter, especially 
with respect to the seeking of union aid, 
were included in the discussion held be- 
tween the managers and actors on Monday. 
The letter follows: 
My dear .Mr. Weber: 

We are advised that at a meeting held 
yesterday of the members of the constituent 
bodies representing the . Associated Actors 
and Artists of America, the following 
resolution was adopted; 

"BE IT RESOLVED, That the mem- 
. bers present pledge themselves to confer 
. upon their respective Councils the right 
to give authority to the International 
Board of Associated Actors and Artists 
of America to formulate such plans and 
make such agreements with other organ- 
ized labor bodies in the amusement world 
as will lead to co-operative action among 
all such bodies." 

Your Association weU knows of the de- 
sire of this Council to deal directly with 
you. This desire still exists. We are will- 
ing today to confer with you to try to 
adjust the situation. The continuance of 
your refusal to do this will, as you must 
see, require us to make associations and 
alliances which may prevent us in the 
future from acting with entire independ- 
ence. If, in the future, you cannot deal 
with us alone the situation will be of your 
own making. An answer by Tuesday night • 
is requested 

Sincerely believing that there is nothing 
in the present situation which cannot be 
adjusted if ordinary equities are observed, 
we are 

Yours very truly, 
(Signed) Frank Gh&xobe. 

Executive Secretary. ■ 
The meeting of the Equity, which was 
held in the Hotel Astor Grand Ball Boom 
on Friday afternoon, was reminiscent of 
the White Rat meetings in which Mount- 
ford and Fitzpatrick were the featured 
speakers. There were about 1,000 persons 
present and the meeting was primarily 
called for .the purpose of having two reso- 
lutions which- had been prepared adopted 
so as to give the officers free rein . in 
handling the situation for the Actors , and 
in invoking any necessary outside aid they 
deemed fit. '" . 

Those who desired admittance to the 
meeting were compelled to show their 
credentials at the door to a host of guards 
who .carefully scrutinized each piece of 
pasteboard as it was. submitted. If they 
were in doubt, the bearer of the credentials 
was referred to a young lady seated at a ' 
table in the corridor who would verify the 
card. That Mountford and Fitzpatrick had 
their following on hand was quite evident, 
for every minute or so some one would step 
up to the door and say, "I have four. or 
six good White Rats here and they want to 
get in." 

Such were permitted to enter, as were 
also some who claimed they were White 
Rats and who nourished National Vaude- 
ville Artists' Cards. It appeared that these 
people made up one half of the audience. 
When Wilson entered he received an 
ovation of considerable duration, as did 
Gillmore, Stewart, Fitzpatrick and Mount- 
ford, who was the last to make his appear- 
ance. It was typical of the old White Rat 
days. ' 

Gillmore opened the meeting by intro- 
ducing President Wilson, who said that the 
meeting was called for the purpose of 
transacting business of the utmost im- 
portance to the organization and then had 
Grant Stewart read a telegram from former 
{Continued 'on page 34.) 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



WANTS THEATRE TAXES 

INC REASED 50 PER CENT 

Bill Introduced at Washington, However, Would Exempt All 

Outdoor Attractions Such as Play Parks from 

Any Impost Whatsoever 



'■jk bill designed to increase by fifty per 
cent the federal tax now levied on the 
price of admission to theatres and other 
places of amusement, while all perma- 
nently located outdoor recreation or 
Amusement places are to be exempted 
from federal admission tax of any kind, 
provided the maximum charge for admis- 
sion is not more than 25 cents, was intro- 
duced into Congress last week by Repre- 
sentative Timberlake. • 

The bill, which, it is claimed, is being 
fostered by the owners of Summer amuse- 
ment parks throughout the country, has 
aroused a great deal of indignation among 
theatrical owners and managers, the claim 
being that the legislation sought is bur- 
densome and discriminatory, to say the 
least. And at the headquarters of the 
United Managers' Protective Association 
it was intimated that more than passing 
recognition would be taken of Repre- 
sentative Timberlake's bill, which has. 
"been referred to the Ways and MeanB 
Committee of the Houbo of Representa- 
-tives and will soon be printed. 

The following is the bill, which provides 



for the amendment of the revenue act of 
1918: 

"Be it enacted by the Senate and House 
of Representatives of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled: 

"That section 800, sub-section 2, para- 
graph 8, of the revenue act of 1918, ap- 
proved February 24, 1919, be amended to 
read as follows: 

"6. A tax of 1% cents for each 10 cents 
or fraction thereof of the amount paid for 
admission to any public performance for 
profit at any roof garden, cabaret or other 
similar entertainment, .to which the 
charge for admission is wholly or in part 
included in the price paid for_ refresh- 
ments, service, or merchandise, the 
amount paid for such admission to be 
deemed to be 20 percentum of the amount 
paid for refreshment, service or merchan- 
dise; .such tax to be paid by the person 
paying for such refreshment, service or 
merchandise. 

"However, no tax shall be levied on any 
amount paid for admission to and within 
permanently located outdoor recreation 
amusement places, the maximum charge 
for which is 25 cents." 



DATES AHEAD 



•"The Bed Dawn"— Tbos. Dixon, opens 3»th 

••^ThoseWho'waTk InDarkness"— Shuberf a. 

opens Stamford, Aug. 7. • 

"Nighty Night"— Adolph Klauber, opens 

Princess Theatre, Aug. 7. 
"Chu Chin Chow"— Comstock and Geat 

opens Century Theatre, Aug. 7. • -.'■ 

^'Breakfast in Bed"— A. H. Woods, opens 

"T S £ mf MaV¥u B bk„ds»-A. H. WOOdS. 

opens Hudson Theatre, Aug. 11. 
"Nell O'Brien's Minstrels"— Opens Pough- 

keeDSle Aug 11. 
"She 'Would and She Did" — Grace George. 

opens Vanderbilt Theatre, Aug^ll. 
-A Pearl of Great Price"— A H. Woods. 

Stamford. Conn., Aug. 12. 
"Buddies" — Selwyn and Company, opens 

Boston. Aug. 12. _ . 

"A Regular Fellow" — Chaa. Emerson Cook. 

opens Cort Theatre, Aug. IS. 
"Hltchy-Koo"— Raymond Hitchcock, opens 
Atlantic City, Aug. 18. . _ . 

•"Adam and Eva" — Comstock and. Geat, 

opens Longacre, N. T., Aug. 1*. 
-"An Innocent Idea" — Chas. Emerson Cook. 
opens Asbury Park. Aug. 18. _ ... 

-"I Miles to Arden" — Moroseo, opens Grand 

Rapids. Mich.. Aug. 21. _ j . ft 
"Look Who's Here" — Max Spiegel, opens 

Washington, Aug. S4. . 

•"Mme. Sappho" — Oliver Moroseo, opens 
Olympic Theatre. Chicago, Aug. 24. : 
' -"The BaBhful Hero" — A. H. Woods, opens 
Bijou Theatre, Aug. 26. 
"First Is Last" — Wm. Harris, opens Max- 
Ine Elliott Theatre, August 26. 
'-"Little Love Birds"— A H. Woods, opens 

Atlantic City. Aug. 25. 
■"Just a Minute" — John Cort, opens Atlantic 

City. Aug. 28. _-.• • ■• __ 

"Lady Tony"— A. H. Woods, opens Stam- 
ford, Conn., Aug. 29. 
'Barney Fagan Benefit — Manhattan Opera 

House. August 31. _ - 

•"Fifty-Fifty" — Sctbilia Theatrical Co.. 

opens Washington, Aug. 31. 
"My Lady Friend"— H. H. Frazee, opens 

Pittsburgh, Labor Day. 
Irlar'B Special Meeting — Sept. S. ■ ; 

•"The Girl in the Stage Box" — A H. Woods, 

- opens Washington. Sept. 1. 

•'The Little Blue Devil." Joe Weber, opens 

Detroit, Sept. 7. 
"Mommor" — Selwyn and Company, opens 

Asbury Park. Sept 8. 
■•"The Great Illusion" — A. H. 'Woods, opens 

Booth Theatre. Sept. 8. 
*!The Little Whooper" — Abe Levy, opens 

Atlantic City. Sept. 15. 
•Robert Mantell opens in "Julius Caesar" at 

the Montauk, Brooklyn. - 
—Seven Miles to Arden" — Oliver Moroseo, 
": opens Little Theatre, Oct. 1. 
So them and Marlowe opens In "Twelfth 
• Night,", at 44th Street Theatre, Oct 6. 
•"The Luck of the Navy"— Comstock and 

- Geat, opens Manhattan Opera House, 
Oct «. 

-"The Unknown Woman"-- A. H. Wooda. 

opens Washington. Oct 6. 
Society of American Singers. William Wade 

Hinshaw, opens Park Theatre, Oct 13. 
"Aphrodite"— Comstock and Geat, opens 

Century Theatre, Nov. 1. 

Chicago Opera Company, opens Chicago, 
Nov. 18. 



"TOO MANY HUSBANDS" LIGHT 

Cot, N. X, Aug. 4.— Al 



Atlantic 
Woods to-night presented a new comedy by 
Somerset Maugham entitled "Too Many 
Husbands," and it must be recorded for 
the first time in many years that Mr. 
Maugham has missed his objective. 

For one thing, there is hardly enough 
story to deserve the name of plot, and for 
the second, this slenderness of fable was 
accentuated by a paucity of comedy. 

The action might be described as a mono- 
tone of scenes, with nothing but the dia- 
logue to differentiate them. There is no 
rise to a climax and hardly any decline 
toward the denouement. In truth, it has 
the stamp of the phlegmatic English so- 
ciety play, scant of the usual Maugham 
brilliance of satire, though in all justice 
there was a flash of that well known per- 
tinence in the first act 

The story concerns a girl whose hus- 
band has been reported killed in the war, 
and who marries a friend of the deceased. 
Her husband returns, and, of course, she 
finds herself with one too' many on her 
hands. She solves her problem by deciding 
to chuck both and marry a third. 

The cast is a finished one, and includes 
Estelle Win wood, Beatrice Miller, Caro- 
lyn Darling, Marguerite St John, Barry 
Baxter, Ernest Lawford, Kenneth Douglas, 
Marion Bnckler, H. Cooper. Cliffe, Florence 
Edney and Richard Gray. 

Kenneth Douglas, in the part of Major 
Cardew, is fresh from England, to-night 
being. his first appearance on an American 
stage. Mr. Woods also induced Clifford 
Brooks to come back with him from abroad 
for the express purpose of staging the 
play- 



STRIKE CLOSES FILM HOUSES 

Elgin, Aug. 5. — On account of the 
strike of the employees of the Aurora, 
Elgin, and Chicago street railways, which 
company furnishes electrical power to the 
"movie" houses here, the four picture 
houses are in darkness, as well as the 
whole' town, except those fortunate enough 
to have gas installed. Settlement of the 
difficulty has not yet been consummated. 



JOSIE COLLINS MAY RETURN 

. Josie Collins, it is reported, is likely to 
return in the near future from London, 
where she is appearing 'with success at 
Daly's Theatre. She may bring a produc- 
tion with her for a short run here. 



FRIARS HOLD THEIR OUTING 

It took something more than the 2.75 
stuff that the American drinking flesh has 
fallen heir to since July 1 to "dampen" 
the spirits of the Friars, who frolicked 
and f roliquored in the open at Glen wood, 
L. I., a week ago Tuesday. In fact, the 
heavily percentaged stuff that these gen- 
try from the elan Friars on West Forty- 
eighth Street imbibed on outing "Sort of 
Tuck," as the saying goes. . 

They started with water, this same be- 
ing the H,0 that flows 'neath the bridges 
yclept Brooklyn, Williamsburgh and 
Queensborough, whose steel spans spread 
gracefully over the River East, up which 
the Friars sailed on the good ship Pontiae. 
For was this not the first outdoor out- 
ing that the Friars have indulged in since 
the war? Yea, boat it was. And if a 
good time wasn't had by all the Friars it 
was only because all the Friars were not 
there, numerically, that is. 

With fifty crippled soldiers from Hos- 
pital No. 1 on Gun Hill Road, as their 
guests, the Friars landed at Glenwood 
and began to outdoor immediately their 
dry (not throats) feet touched the earth 
from which worms are dug for fishing pur- 
poses. 

First there was a baseball game be- 
tween the N. V. A. and the Friars. While 
it was not played exactly according to the 
Hoyle of this game, it was played accord- 
ing to both of the Haigs that used to fig- 
ure so prominently in our national life. 
The N. V. A. won and, according to the 
whaling they handed the Friarn, the score 
would have to be reckoned in logarithms. 
Bob Cannefax, who is wont to poke a 
tapering oak stick at an ivory ball rolling 
o'er green cloth, umpired the game and 
his decisions were entirely satisfactory — 
to the winners. And even if he wasn't so 
fair, nobody seemed to mind it very much 
except the losers, these same being his 
own people. 

There were races here, divided about 
equally as follows: Of the Jewish and of 
the Irish ; and of the running it suffices to 
say that Eddie Auerbach won the fat 
man's, Fred Bloch's lolling tongue touch- 
ing the tape a dose (for it was hot) sec- 
ond, these twain being the only ones to 
come in ahead of Mannie Tannenbanm. 

The race for the Rotary cup was won 
by Ray Schlndler, and not far behind him 
in the order named came Boo Hatch and 
J. J. Goldman. But all of them being 
close friends. Judge Jim Corbett took it 
upon himself to declare the race a draw, 
feeling, probably, that nobody would be 
hurt by his decision except the winner. 

S. J. Kaufman was starter, and his de- 
cisions were fair and beyond reproach. 
Jack Gleason hung around the. field in his 
captain's uniform, caparisoned in a straw 
lid that seemed to bring out all the lines 
in his stunning figure — most stunning if it 
happened to land on one in a football 
scrimmage. . 

Trouble must have been anticipated, at 
least it seemed so by the number of police 
guests that tbe Friars invited. There was 
Capt. John L. Falconer, who won a num- 
ber of races; Capt Charles A. Zanes, 
Capt William Davis, Lieut Stephen Rudd 
and Lieut William Brennan. 

And anyhow, it was a good thing that 
the police were there, for some of them 
sang and contributed more than a guest- 
like share to the gayety of the occasion. 
Major J. D. Leggett accompanied the 
crippled soldiers in ambulances to the out- 
ing. The nurses were: Mrs. I*. Altars, 
Miss Charlotte Droogan, Mrs. A. L. Mont- 
gomery and Miss L. E. NeUe. There was 
a race for nurses, L e., tbe men didn't 
really run after them, which was won by 
Miss Charlotte Droogan. She was a pretty 
good runner. 

Dick Webster, registrar of Brooklyn, 
came across the bridge to attend the out- 
ing. Herbert Webb, recently come from 
Shanghai, China, represented the Oriental 
race that he's almost beginning to look like 
from intimate association. Elliott Nugent 
was first in the 10O-yard dash for actors. 
Tyler Brooke and "Bngs" Baer also being 
in the race. 

The crutch race for soldiers was won 
by one-legged Private Earle. There was a 
horse race for cartoonists,'* who were 
mounted on hobby horses, which was won 



by either Ripley, Hoban, "Bugs" Baer, 
Tom McNamara or Fred Bloch. 

Jess Dandy and Mannie Tannenbaum 
won the baldheaded men's race, and at 
least one of them received a comb aad 
brush with which to sweep his hirsute 
adornment 

There was a shore dinner that simply 
spoiled everybody's appetite. They just et 
and et and et S. Jay Kaufman was toast- 
master, which means that he had to rush 
through bis meal more quickly than, the 
rest Former Deputy Police Commissioner 
George Dougherty said some nice thing* 
and Lew Brice danced, Jess Dandy grim- 
aced and Eddie Miller, of the Shnbert of- 
fice, sang. 

There were a number of empty bottles 
floatin' . down the River Bast after the 
outingers bad left tbe Poniioo moored to 
the dock at the foot of Forty -seventh street 
which means, and is a fact that the Friars 
and their guests had a wonderful time. 

Motion pictures of the outing will be 
displayed on the screen in the Great Hall 
of the Monastery, Thursday, August 7, at 
8:30 P. M. 

The prises will also be distributed to the 
fortunate winners of the athletic games. 



NEW ACTS 

"Cairo" is the title of a new girl act 
which Jack McClellan will soon have 
ready. It' is from his pen and will have 
ten people in the cast. 

A new act to be called Automat Dolls 
is being put into shape by A. Behrens. In- 
cluded in the cast will be Billy Burt, Bob- 
bie Lucky, Gertrude Bartram and Behrens. 
Behrens wrote the act, and it will be 
ready for an opening within two weeks. 

Frank Townsend and Thad Wilber, who, 
for the last two seasons, have been pre- 
senting "The Smart' Alec" in vaudeville, 
have a new act in preparation called "Hot 
Mince Pie," written by Townsend, him- 
self. They will show it some time during 
the month. 

May West, last season with tbe Arthur 
Hammerstein production, "Sometime," is 
going into vaudeville for a few weeks 

C" >r to joining a new musical show. She 
a new act assisted by a pianist and 
two or three orchestral players. 

Belle Fromme, formerly of Mayo and 
Fromme, is rehearsing a new single act 
which she plana to break in within the 
next week or so. 

Larry Reilly will produce a new act in 
vaudeville next season. Elba - Robeson 
has been re-engaged for it. 

Charles Bartholomew will open in a new 
act at the Halsey, Brooklyn, on August 7. 

Frank Hale, formerly of Hale and Pat- 
terson, is putting out a new act in three 
scenes with the following people in the 
cast: Margaret Severin, Dixie ONefl, 
Peggy Carter, Babette, Eddie Edwards 

and Jazz Band, and two Chinese girls. The 
turn will carry two special settings. 

ATHLETICS 

On Saturday the Lights ball team win 
play the Beach Hurst A. C, and on Son- 
day they will cross bats with the repre- 
. sebtatives of "Tbe Gaieties of 1019." Both 
games will be played at Light's Field, 
Freeport. 



The Loew- Variety baseball team defeat- 
ed the Lights by a score of 1 to at Lights 
Field, Freeport, last Sunday afternoon. 
This was one of tbe most sensational 
games of the season and the winning run 
was scored in the ninth inning. 

The Lights lay their downfall to their 
pitcher, Dowd. In that inning, Harvey 
bnnted toward first base, Dowd fielded the 
ball and threw it over the head of Joe 
Schents, who was covering first base, al- 
lowing the runner to make It safely. Then 
he made a wild throw to catch Harvey 
off of first base and the latter reached 
second on this error. 



CROMWELL WEDS MARIE GOFF 

Marie Goff, the young, leading woman 
who was handled so roughly in "At 9.45" 
by John Cromwell, playing the detective 
chief, that emotional peonle in the au- 
dience sometimes shouted "Let her alone," 
has become the bride of Mr. CromwelL 

They were married on Sunday at Union 
Hill, N. J. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 





TRY TO BREAK 
MOSS LEASE 
ONFLATBUSH 

HOUSE MAKING GOOD PROFIT 



The owners of tie Flatbush Theatre, 

Brooklyn, are endeavoring to cancel the 
ten year lease which B. 8. Moss hsa on 
that house. This became known last Wed- 
nesday when Myron Sulzberger, attorney 
for Moss, and Isidor Bnrbanm, represent- 
ing; the Borough. Operating Corporation, 
which owns the Flatbush Theatre, argued 
a motion before Justice CaTlwghan of Hie 
Brooklyn Supreme Court to continue the. 
restraining order obtained by the owners 
against Moss. This prohibits Moss from 
proceeding with alteration work started on 
the Flatbnsh Theatre, now closed for the 
season, but scheduled to re-open again next 
month. Judge OaHaghan took the matter 
under advisement. 

According to the complaint filed by the 
owners, Moss has no right to make altera- 
tions on the theatre costing more than 
$1,000 without the consent of the owners. 
The estimated coat of the alterations he 
is planning at this time is 525,000. The 
owners claim Mobs is going ahead with the 
work withont their consent And the rea- 
son they have failed to give Moss their 
consent they claim, is because the theatre 
was leased to Moss to be conducted by Mm 
aa a vaudeville and motion picture house, 
and now that he ia sfwlsraii with the 
Famous Players- Lanky Corporation he will 
eliminate the vaudeville from the house's 
policy. This, they say, will diminish the 
profits, and since the owners have a fifty 
per cent share in the profits, under the 
lease, they are directly concerned with the 
manner in which Moss runs the house. 

Moss, in answering affidavits filed by his 
attorneys, ascribes an entirely different 
reason to the motive of the owners in seek- 
ing to cancel his lease at thia time. He 
claims they are trying to force him to buy 
the theatre at their own price. 

Under the lease entered into between the 
litigants in September, 1916, Moss took 
the bouse over or ten years, he to pay the 
owners a yearly rental of 912,000,811 taxes 
and insurance, and ater all overhead 
charges were paid, including $100. weekly 
to the Mosa interests for supervising the 
theatre, the profits were to be divided on a 
50-50 basis. Continuing, Moss points out 
that previous to his taking over the Flat- 
bush it had been losing money for the 
owners, who failed to make it pay even 
after they had booked it first through the 
Marcus Locw agency and later through 
the Keith agency. - 

And even after Moas took the house over 
in September. 1918, he claims, the losses 
continued for four months, the total for 
Oat period being S2.09L31. However, he 
sets forth that he did pnt the house on a ' 
paying basis, giving the following schedule 
of profits since he took it over: 1917 (12 

months), $13J86J4: 1918. $16,140.24; 
and from January 1. 1919, to last May 31, 
$21,217.46, making the amount of the total 
net- profits since he took over the house 
$50,543.84. 

Moss denies that he will change the 
policy of the house to the detriment of the 
subsequent receipts and profits, pointing 
out that whereas he has been playing small 
time vaudeville acta and showing second 
run pictures, it is his intention to present 
big time vaudeville acts and first run pic- 
tures hereafter ; and the reason he is cut- 
ting part of the stage away 'is because he 
intends to engage an orchestra of twenty- 
five union musicians for the house, there 
being room for but ten men in the orches- 
tra pit at present. He also avers that 
during bis tenancy be has expended a total 
of $12,008.69 on repairs and alterations 
Which the owners have consented to. 



That he negotiated with the owners to 
boy the house is also set firth by Moss. 
He says that Ebling, the brewer, who is 
the majority stockholder in the corpora- 
tion which owns the property, asked $300,- 
000 for the house, which was built in 1913. 
He practically closed the deal with Ebling, 
agreeing to buy the theatre for 8243,000, 
with $50,000 cash to be paid over by him. 
But the deal fell through because Ebling 
demanded $75,000 in cash, explaining that 
he needed that much to boy out the com- 
paratively email interest held by Anton 
Neuberger, president of the company. 

John . J. Kelt, the real estate broker, 
through whose efforts Moas obtained the 
Flatbush under lease, in an affidavit filed 
in support of Mom states that Neuberger 
told him that the Moss Lease would be 
broken, in which event the owners could 
get 8300,000 for the property. 



MAX HART DISCHARGED 

Max Hart was last week discharged as 
receiver of his own booking business, in 
which capacity he has been acting under a 
Supreme Court appointment since June, 
1918. The receivership resulted from the 
suit started by his wife, Madge Fox Hart, 
for one-half of her husband's property and 
an accounting of his affairs in general. 

Judge Ford last Saturday granted the 
motion made by Hart's attorneys, Blandy, 
Mooney and Shipman, to discharge him. 
from the receivership. This was in line 
with the recent decision handed down by 
the Appellate Division of the Supreme 
Court on the appeal which Hart took from 
the Supreme Court's decision earlier in the 
year. The court below found nut Mrs. 
Hart was entitled, as she claimed, to one- 
half of all of her husband's property. The 
Appellate Division modified the judgment 
to the extent that it allowed her only one- 
half of the property owned by Hart up to 
and including January, 1917. 

The case has been referred to Abraham 
Stern, who has been appointed referee by 
the Supreme Court to compute the amount 
that Mrs. Hart is entitled to under the 
decision. Incidentally, the $50,000 bond 
deposited by Hart as receiver, has also 
been discharged. Edward W. Drncker ia 
Mrs. Hart's attorney. 



BUTTERFIELD IS EXPANDING 

Battle Cheek, Mich., Aug. 4. — W. S. 
Butterfield - is to erect a new theatre at 
Flint, Michigan, to be known aa the Re- 
gent Work has already been begun, .and 
the house .will be, ready by New Tear's 
Day. , , The new Regent Theatre at Lima, 
Ohio, will open on August 28, and the Re*, 
gent at Kalamazoo will open on : August 31. 



COMPLAINS OF LOEW ACT 

R. Mortimer, who claims to be a member 
of the original Oxford Trio, a vaudeville 
act, has asked the N. V. A., complaint 
department, to take measures to restrain 
an act now playing the Loew Circuit from 
using their title. The matter is being in- 
vestigated. 



PANTAGES WILL. BOOK IT 

Columbus, Ohio, Aug. 2. — The South- 
ern Theatre, of this city, which has-been 
leased by Fred Stair, of Toronto, will open 
August 18 with vaudeville booked by the 
Pantages Circuit Fred Stair will man- 
age the theatre and Jake Lavene will be 
business manager. 



PARK PUTS IN VAUDE. 

Danburt, Conn., Aug. 4. — Beginning 
tonight there will be inaugurated a new 
policy at Kenosia Park. Hereafter the 
program will consist of vaudeville and pic- 
tures. 



POLI MANAGERS 

HOLD BIG 

OUTING 

BASEBALL GAME NEARLY A RIOT 



ASBURY HOUSE DROPS VAUDE. . 

Asbubt Pabk. N. J.. Aug. 4. — The Gar- 
den Theatre here has eliminated its vaude- 
ville program and will hereafter present a 
straight picture program. . 



A reunion of the Poli Circuit mans 
and executive staff took place last Sun- 
day at Cherry Hill Farm, New- Haven, 
Conn. S. Z. Poli was host, and had all of 
his managers there with the exception 
of James Harrison, of Washington, who 
was unable to attend on account of ill- 
ness in his family. 

The managers assembled at the Poli 
Theatre, New Haven, where they were 
taken in automobiles to the farm, owned 
by h. M. Sagol, one of Poll's executive 
staff, where athletics and a baseball game 
were indulged in during the morning, 
after which a clam bake was served. 

The ball game, with the score a tie at 
7 to 7, was broken np in the sixth inning 
when the members of both teams, com- 
posed of the house managers on one side 
and' the executive staff on the other, 
mobbed R. C. Miller, who is. the head of 
the. Poli motion picture booking offices. 
Miller was reviled and abused and, at 
one time, threatened with bodily harm, 
and only through the efforts of P. Alonzo 
was he able to leave the field unharmed. 
Another person to assume the duties of 
umpire could not be found, so the game 
was called off. 

John McCarthy and BUI Jackson, who 
run the Poli theatrea in Scranton, and 
John Calvin, who operates the Wilkes- 
Barre Theatre, refused to ride to the farm 
in automobiles. So George Poli secured 
a coal cart, in which these three belliger- 
ents were conducted to the place. Matt 
Saunders, manager of the Bridgeport the- 
atre, came over in a new Ford car. Some 
jester had a sign painted which was 
tacked onto the tail end of the car. It 
read, "Just Married. Last year, a Haynes: 
this year a Ford; next year a baby car- 
riage." 

During the bake Mr. Poll mado a short 
address to his managers in which he out- 
lined the plans of the Poli organization 
for the coming season. 

Those who attended besides the "Big 
Chief," included: P. Alonzo, Edward Poli, 
George Poli, Lv M. Sagol, Benjamin Slade, 
Peter Tranchi, R. C. Miller, Lew Garvey- 
and Lew Dotyv all of the executive staff, 
and the following managers: Ollie Ed. 
wards, Palace Theatre, New Haven; 
Walter • Griffith,. Bijou Theatre,- New 
Haven; Henry Menges, Hyperion The- 
atre, New Haven; James McCarthy, Plaza 
Theatre, Bridgeport;. Matt Saunders, Poli 
Theatre, Bridgeport; George Elmore, Poli 
Theatre, Waterbury; John Murphy, 
Garden Theatre, Waterbury; R. B. Royce, 
Strand Theatre, Waterbury; Harry Par- 
son, general manager of the Waterbury 
theatres; Lew KiHry, who will manage 
the new Poli Theatre, Hartford; James 
Clancy, Palace Theatre, Hartford; Gor- 
don Wrighter, Palace Theatre, Springfield; 
Thomas Meehan, Poli Theatre, Worcester; 
Joe Cone, Grand Theatre, Worcester; 
Bert Howard, Plaza Theatre, Worcester ; 
Lloyd George Vallis, relief manager; John 
McCarthy, Poli Theatre, Scranton; Will- 
iam Jackson; Academy Theatre, Scranton; 
John Galvin, Poli Theatre, Wilkes -Barre; 
Frank Harvey, Life Theatre, Meriden, and 
James Thatcher, manager of the stock 
producing companies in the Poli theatres. 

SIGNED FOR "HITCHY-KOO" 

Duffy and Sweeney have signed with 
Raymond Hitchcock for "Hitchy Koo." 
Hitchcock saw the act at ' the Lights' 
Cruise at Far Rockaway on Saturday 
night and promptly signed them. The 
show went into rehearsal on Monday night 



TROUBLE IN WARD ACT 

Will J. Ward has been having trouble 
with the girls in his piano act and, aa a 
result, will open his engagement on the 
Orpheum Circuit next Sunday at Winni- 
peg, Canada, with a new aggregation. 

The trouble all came about when Frances 
Holcomb, one of the girls, served notice on 
Ward that she either wanted an increase in 
salary or would quit the act Ward told 
Miss Holcomb that he had a contract with 
her to appear for him at $50 a week and 
that he would hold her to It The girl 
consulted an attorney and he advised her 
that the Ward contract would not hold in 
court and that if he did not meet bar de- 
mands, that she would have no trouble if 
she broke it. Acting under thia advise, 
she Informed Ward that she desired $7R a 
week or would quit the act When he 
refused her demand, she gave him her 
notice to take effect at Waterbury, last 
Saturday night. 

Then, it is said, Ward accused three of 
the girls who were working in the act 
with 1 siding in with Miss Holcomb, and told 
them that an account of their attitude they 
would also be free to leave his act at 
Waterbury. The three girls whom he re- 
leased were Ray Evans, Kittle Leavitt and 
Jeanette Leavitt All of these girls have 
been with the Ward act for the last two- 
years. It could not be learned on Monday 
whom Ward was replacing these girls with. 

DOOLEY PUTS OVER GOOD SHOW 

"Skipper" J. Francis Dooley staged 
what was declared to be one of the best 
shows of the season at the Lights Club 
house in Freeport last Saturday, night It 
was a little late in starting, as the return 
of the members of the Cruise from Far 
Rockaway was awaited. 

Those who appeared on the bill were: 
Meng and Snyder, Andy Rice, Yates and 
Reid, At Von Tiber, Raymond Hitchcock, 
Gilda Gray, Frank Tlnney and Pearl 
White, in a travesty skit Following the 
vaudeville programme, an afterpiece burr 
lesque on "Uncle' Tom's' Cabin" waa pre- 
sented. Those who participated were Eddie 
Carr, Sam Martin, Tommy Dugan, Mike 
Coakley, Joe Dunlevy, Jim Diamond, Frank. 
Sweeney and Harry Hills, 

Thia Saturday evening, Sophie Tucker 
will be "skipper,"' and she has arranged a 
bill composed of all female talent. 

JIMMY LUCAS ARRESTED fj. 
Jimmy Lucas, while driving a motor,- car 
at Parkville avenue and Ocean Parkway 
last week, ran down three. people, one of 
them TToward Dean, who is, suffering from 
a, fractured skull which may ;'cause . his 
dca,th. Lucas, who was arraigned in court, 
for driving without. a license, was flned v $5 
in the Flatbnsh Avenue Court.' Should 
Dean die Lucas will probably have to an- 
swer & technical charge of homicide. 

HOWARD AND. BROOKE SPLIT 

Charles Howard 'and Tyler Brooke, who, 
for. the last three months, have been 
playing in vaudeville, dissolved partner- 
ship on Saturday. Brooke ia going with 
the Henry W. Savage production, "Head 
Over Heels," and Howard also plans to 
join a production. 

SIGN FOR BAYES SHOW 

Green and Parker, who have been pre- 
senting a black-face act in vaudeville 
known as "At the Junction," have been 
signed by Nora Bayes to go with her 
show, "Ladies First," for forty weeks. 

RENARD AND JORDAN ROUTED 

Nat Renard and Betty Jordan have re- 
ceived a route over the Keith time with 
their new act, "The New Hotel Clerk." 
Bernard Burke is their agent 

GET ENTIRE PANTAGES TIME 

Woolf and Patterson have been booked 

to play all the Pantages time by Joe 
Michaels. They, open their tour on Ang 
17 at 'Minneapolis..- • 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




PALACE 

With business at capacity, the specta- 
tors witnessed a good show, bat nearing 
the finish of the first half, the bill dragged 
considerably. The last half contained four 
numbers and each one went over with a 
bang, the big honors going to Venita 
Gould, who impersonated stage celebrities. 

The Pictures opened. 

The , Flying Martins started the vaude- 
ville portion in a rip-roaring manner and 
almost stopped the show in the difficult 
first position. The boys work on the 
trapeze for only three minutes, and put 
more action into their brief stay than any 
other act of like description displays in 
twice the time. Miss Sidney Mathews, a 
pretty brunette, handles the rope that 
guides the trap and her pleasing smile and 
snappy frock lent much class to the picture. 

Krang and La Salle found number two 
spot an easy one and registered a hit after 
delivering a budget of popular songs con- 
taining, one Italian number. Their har- 
mony is well handled.- They offered two 
encores after the act proper, and could 
have done another, as the audience ap- 
plauded them vigorously. 

The Mannein Sisters are a clever pair 
of dancers who have embodied a few novel- 
ties in their dancing numbers. Between 
their dances, David Schooler, who well 
may be termed one of the best pianists in 
vaudeville, tucked away a hit that waa 
truly deserved. The act is pretty to look 
•a. 

Clifton Crawford opened with a BOOM 
bit that he offered in The World of 
Pleasure" Company a few years ago, and 
most of the talk did not go over on account 
of the ancient material. He has strung 
together a number of old bits that, -in less 
capable hands, would undoubtedly fail. 
However, the audience gave him a good 
hand at the finish, won by his expert 
delivery. 

Gas Edwards was assisted by Vincent 
O'Donnell and Alice and Hazel Furness. 
Apparently, Edwards has put this act 
together rather hastily, as there is no con- 
tinuity and only a number of songs strung 
together. He should stop using ad lib re- 
marks, as he is not a convdlan and the 
talk weakened the offering. O'Donnell 
sang in a pure tenor voice and carried 
away the honors. 

"Topics of the Day" was flashed daring 
intermission. 

Venita Gould supplied the surprise of the 
Monday afternoon performance, a» her 
imitationR ' and impersonations were ex- 
cellent characterizations. However, the 
Fay Bain ter bit from "Bast is West," 
should either ' be eliminated or cut.. . The 
balance of the' imitations, especially the 
' Cohan and Tangnay bits, were marvelous. 
Miss Gould thanked her audience by tell- 
ing them that this is her first appearance 
at the Palace and that, she was overjoyed 
to know that they liked her. 

Hyams and Mclntyre presented "May- 
hloom," by Frank Stammers, and It can 
truthfully be said that this playlet is one 
-of the classiest of one-act skits. Not alone 
is the story pretty, but the work of the 
principals is strikingly good. Two musical 
numbers, one accompanied by a dance, are 
also expertly delivered. "Maybloom," with 
Hyams and Mclntyre, will live in the minds 
of vaudeville audiences forever. 

Herbert Clifton was a scream from the 
.moment he appeared. The "biddy" bit 
opened and howls of delight greeted the 
artist. A new number in which he por- 
trays a "Nun" was beautifully costumed 
and augmented by a gorgeona set. He sings 
,a high class ballad, bringing forth high 
notes that rang as clear as a bell. The 
• last number is an Oriental affair and, in 
/this, he is attired in Oriental garb that is 
.marvelous. The act is one of the best in 
present-day vaudeville. 
, ■ Nat Nasarro, Jr., and his Jasa Band of 
Bailors, closed the show. The splendid 
music and the grotesque dance by Nasarro 
held many in their seats. J. D. 




HENDERSON'S 

Davis and Pelle, in a strong man act 
that they title an "Equilibristic Mara- 
thon," opened the show and raced through 
a lot of difficult hand to hand balancing 
stunts. Some of them were sensational 
and caused more than one person in the 
audience to hold their breath. They scored 
a bit. 

The Wilton Sisters followed and sang, 
danced and played their way into a hit. 
The audience seemed to fall for them with- 
out even trying and they scored a large 
hit. They lived np to their billing of 
"clever youthful entertainers." 

Howard Langford and Anna Fredericks 
are two very clever people who, adde to 
talent and personality have a very cl er 
act. They were an undoubted hit fiom 
the moment they stepped onto the stage 
until they, went off. Their act la supposed 
to take place in a lingerie shop, and a lot 
of comedy concerns woman's whims in 
clothes. 

Al Raymond styles himself "The United 
Statesman." He was formerly of the team 
of Baymond and Caverly and several of. 
the gags he is using date back to the 
earlier days of the team's history. His 
act very much resembles the one done by 
Sam Bernard several years ago. He suc- 
ceeded in gaining his quota of laughs and 
packed away a rather good aized hit. 

J. Rosamond Johnson, formerly of Cole 
and Johnson, assisted by his five colored 
syncopaters, started jazzing it np and bad 
the folks tapping time to their melodies. 
These boys harmonise nicely and, several 
old southern folk songs met with approval. 
The darky camp meeting bit was a riot. 
Johnson sang several of the songs he and 
his partner made famous in the olden times 
and, evidently, many people had not for- 
gotten tbem yet His boys did some solo 
songs and finished with some real southern 
jazz. 

'<Skeet" Gallagher and Irene Martin, as- 
sisted by Robert H. Beldon, in a skit 
called "Sweaters," came next. Gallagher 
la a very clever young fellow and his part- 
ner has more than the usual share of good 
looks. They have some very clever dia- 
logue and dances, which they execute in a 
manner that is bound to be satisfactory. 
Gallagher is a rather good singer and 
several comedy numbers of hia were hits. 
The act concerns a young fellow who had 
been in the army and received a sweater 
from a Miss Smith. He goes to find her, 
and, when he does, well, everything ends 
happily. Beldon did well, also. 

Charles King, assisted by four very 
clever and pretty girls, in his unusual 
vaudeville production "Dream Stars," held 
the interest of the audience for just thirty 
minutes, and several encores. He haa one 
Of the classiest singing acts in vaudeville 
today. He combines talent, scenery, pro- 
duction and material, in an act that, not 
for one of the thirty minutes, loses its hold. 
The nucleus of the act is a young fellow 
who has been in love with girls all over 
the world, and who, in reverie, sees the 
scenes of his. youthful follies, enacted 
again. We don't blame him a bit for being 
in love with them, for we could be our- 
selves. 

Stan Stanley, in "A Dollar A Kiss," had 
the folks laughing all the time. Stanley 
works from the audience and is assisted 
by a man on stage, and a girl who works 
both in the audience and on the stage. His 
portrayal of the "wise cracker" is all that 
could be desired. He got laughs galore 
and, if he were- really to get a dollar for 
every one, we don't know how he could 
take the money home with him.' 

Sylvia Loyal and her pigeons and 
poodle closed the show. The act is beauti- 
ful and stands out among acta of its kind. 

S. K. 



BUSHWICK 

"Bagpicking" is, to a certain degree, an 
art. And there are many exponents of it. 
Alfred Farell and Company are among the 
beat. The pictures "painted" were very 
interesting, and, in many cases, very diffi- 
cult. The act scored a hit. 

Harry and Grace Ellsworth, in a song 
and dance offering, came next. The man 
bears the brunt of the work, with apparent 
liking. They opened with a "rube" song 
and dance, after which Miss Ellsworth 
sang a "coon" song, followed by a dance. 
Harry's "hock" dance, which followed, is 
one of the classics of its kind. 

Paul Decker and Company, in an act 
called "The Ruby Ray," provided laughs 
aplenty. He plays the part of a boy still 
in love with a former sweetheart, now the 
wife of another man. He pays her a visit 
and tells her that, without her, he cannot 
live, so he is going to kill himself, She 
tells him that she haa a cure for hia illness, 
in "The Ruby Ray," a new wonder drink 
that her husband has invented. She gives 
him a dose and he' forgets all about hia 
love for her. 

Subsequently, returning to bis apart- 
ment, he finds a beautiful blond there and 
immediately falls in love with her. He 
finally decides that a new love ia better 
than an old dead one and all ends happily 
amidst roars of laughter from the audi- 
ence. 

Moss and Frye bad no trouble in. keeping 
the stream of merriment allowing and got 
their full quota of laughs despite all the 
comedy that had preceded. These lads 
keep adding new gags to their act all the 
time, for they had about six new ones in 
it on Monday night. The foolish questions 
put by Frye to his partner would move 
even a deaf and dumb man to laughter. 
Their singing waa also very good. 

Ernest Evans, assisted by four girls, 
offered a dance and musical act which 
needs, more than anything else, a lot of 
shortening and rehashing Evans may be 
a good dancer, but bis act drags too much. 
There is a long wait between numbers 
that is detrimental to interest in the act. 
The Murray Sisters, in what they 
termed original song recitations, opened 
after Intermission and were given a round 
of applause upon their entrance. Marian 
opened with a song in which she prayed 
that she might be a small, cute little girl 
to some husky "brute," so that she could 
get some of the loving she had missed. 
Victoria followed with a "coon" song in 
which a dusky dame of the South warns 
her returned soldier husband not to start 
a private war. A "mother" song by 
Marian followed, after which Victoria sang 
a comedy number called "If It Wasn't 
You, Who Was It?" Some comedy cross- 
fire closed the act. They were appre- 
ciated and applauded. 

George McKay and Ottie Ardine, in a 
comedy and dancing act, came next. These 
folks have the same act they have been 
doing for the last few seasons and still 
they go on making a hit and . rolling np 
applause. McKay's "chance'' remarks 
were met on all sides by volleys of laugh- 
ter and the quaint pronunciations of Miss 
Ardine could not help but Induce laughter. 
Their dancing was a revelation and Mc- 
Kay's singing was received with favor. 
They had to respond to three encores, 
which gave them the hit of the bill- 
Bernard and Daffy closed the bill with 
a singing and dancing act that was rather 
weak until the finish. Daffy sings, while 
Bernard accompanies him on the piano. 
For a finish,. Duffy "shinuneyed" and 
many a Miss in the audience uttered cries 
of envy after he had done. Bernard did 
a "Pat Rooney" that sent them over for 
a hit. S. K. 



NEW BRIGHTON 

Topping- the bill is Lucille Cavanagh in 
a "1910 Edition of Her Kaleidoscope of 
Dance, Color and Song," in which Wheeler 
Wadsworth, Mel Craig and William 
B. Taylor lend their cleverness. And 
they are given every opportunity to show 
their worth. Miss Cavanagh generously 
sharing honors with them. Notwithstand- 
ing their presence, however, it is the lady 
herself that makes this act what it is, 
for her quaint personality stands out un- 
mi sta k ably. The act ia sumptuously 
staged and la truly a sample of Vaude- 
ville de Luxe. 

Following closely for first honors ia 
Marie Nordstrom in her successful offer- 
ing, "Let's Pretend," written especially 
for her by Frances Nordstrom. The ma- 
teria], though Tery original, could fail 
utterly in leas capable hands. It ia Miss 
Nordatrom's simple charm that gets it 
over so successfully. ' 

It is good showmanship rather than any 
particular novelty that gaina a good hand 
for Adonis and company, opening the 
bill. With a different setting and a usual 
routine, this act would be like many 
others of its kind. But Adonis has, evi- 
dently, realized this and does his rather 
ordinary feats in such an artlstie way 
that he wina applause which ia certainly 
merited. 

He is followed by two clever steppers, 
Dan Stanley and Al Birnea, who do a 
number of eccentric dances in one that 
are well received. 

Billed ss the "Human Aeroplane," the 
Four Senational Boises prove that they 
are more than a rubber-stamp tumbling 
act, and justly deserve a Rood spot on 
the bill. Their act consists of three men 
and a girl. The latter does not appear 
in the conventional tights, but in stylish, 
everyday dress, which makes one think, 
at first, that her share in the act will con- 
sist mostly of smiles and pretty poses. 
But ahe surprises the audience by proving 
aa sensational aa her partners, whirling 
- and tumbling through the air undaunted 
by her dainty attire. Besides furnishing 
the fun, the brunt of the dangerous work 
falls upon the clown of the quartette, 
who does his work excellently. 

Joe Morris and Flo Campbell appear in 
"The Art-ate Her," by Joseph L Brown- 
ing. • Some of the material used- is grow- 
ing rather antique. For instances (She) 
Have you the correct timet (He) Yes, I 
have. Also, the confidence business to 
the audience by the male member of the' 
dno, while hia partner . ia changing her 
costume, haa been worked to death, and 
when Morris, in one part of the act, ia 
discovered in an upper box, knitting, on* 
cannot help but feel ' that the act needs 
some new material and life, for the knlt- 
ting-at-theatre-daya are over. The pair 
are too clever to hinder success solely by 
the. use of old material. 

Jack Wyatt and hia Scotch Lads and 
Lassies seem to always score big when 
the clans gather in kilts and tartans to 
sing and play "aa 'tis done this day in 
Bonnie Dundee." The act adds color to a 
bill and the hard work of those in it ia 
bound to appeal to any class of variety 
audience. 

Wyatt eloaed the first half of the bill 
and it fell to Joe Tbwle to take up the 
thread again after intermission. The 
house seemed in a receptive mood for 
Towle's foolishness, and the comedian 
found himself popular with the matinee 
crowd. Hia description of' his trip to 
France won him many laughs. Although 
he 'has been using the same entrance for 
such a long time that, by now, the sur- 

Srise element must be almost nil, it still 
rings a laugh, which ia, after all, the 
proof of the pudding. 

After Lucille Cavanagh's act and 
Marie Nordstrom, in the order named, 
Sehna Braatz closed the show, and tho 
audience remained and enjoyed her feats 
of juggling, which were excellently per- 
formed. H. J. G. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1915 



V^IC/ 




ORPHEUM 

It seems to be the generally adopted 
custom to open the show with a juggling 
act whenever there is one on the pro- 
gram- For that reason, moat probably, 
Wilfred Da Bois wag assigned the number 
one position. It would have been easy tor 
him, however, to hare held down a lower 
spot, for Dn Bois is a thorough master 
In his line of work and gives a moat satis- 
factory exhibition. 

Mabelle Sherman and Arthur Uttry have 
a skit entitled "Cnpid Used a Whip." 
They are a duo of capable performers who ' 
make the beat of what they have, but are 
handicapped by material which will not 
meet with approval in the bis; time booses. 
They have made an effort to bolst er up the 
dialogue, there being one or two new lines. 
The recitation used by the male member 
of the team is one which, possesses a great 
deal Of sentiment. -But it is not a great 
poetic work. The song finish waa liked , 
but the encore given did not receive favor. 
It should not have been used, 

Majgsssl Ellis exchanged positions on the 
bill with Dorothy Shoemaker anfl Com- 
pany. Mifl«m Ellis, last year, mystified 
the inhabitants of the Bronx when she 
was one of the stellar attractions at the 
Bronx Exposition. This Summer, how- 
ever, she is exhibiting her mind-reading 
feats in the variety bouses. The fellow 
who served as ballyhoo for her at tie 
Bronx resort is" still with her, and the 
two worked without a hitch 

Dick Duffy and Betty Caldwell are a 
clever pair who offer an entertaining skit. 
Miss Caldwell, during the latter portion 
of the offering, wears a gown with, con- 
siderable exposure. She has a splendid 
back, but should not show quite so much 
of it. The dialogue was bandied excellently 
and they did the best they could with it. 
It needs brushing up in a few spots, how- 
ever. 

The New Spanish Review, which broke 
in under the title, "Fiesta Espanola," is a 
melange of song and dance by performers 
from the "Land of Joy" Company that 
played at the Park Theatre some time ago. 
The organization includes a dancer of re- 
markable agility in Antonio Bilboa, a 
charming prima donna in Rosa De Grands, 
a good dance duo in Man and Juli Ber- 
diales, and another graceful exponent of 
Terpsichorean art in Senora Lola Bravo, 
styled the Spanish Pavlowa. Two other 
men are with the troupe, One Of them doing 
a bit of a dance and the other helping 
with some vocal contributions. Several 
catchy melodies are. rendered as well.aa a 
number of dance bits. The bit offered by 
Bilboa, early in the forward portion of the 
act, stood out strongly. 

Dorothy Shoemaker, Jack Roseleigh and 
Company, opened the second section of the 
bill. Roseleigh's name is announced on the 
programme, but is not pot up on the an- 
nunciators. Nor do the posters without, 
carry the appelation. 

"Mr. James, of London," ia a fairly well 
written playlet, but it drags somewhat. It 
is one of the ordinary run of sketches that 
do not arouse any unusual enthusiasm, just 
managing to bold its own. 

Ciccolini, who has appeared with the 
Chicago Opera Company and other operatic 
organizations, displayed a voice which, 
although not very powerful, is a delight to 
the ear. He is truly an artist and has 
wisely selected pieces which have simple 
melodies and are easy to appreciate. He 
started with the prison aria from "Tosca," 
followed it with Massenef s Elegie, and 
then rendered two popular ballads. He 
was called back for an encore, and, after 
singing about half of it, suddenly' walked 
off stage. It waa not a suitable finish to 
a performance such ss his. 

Ward and Van closed the show and held 
the audience in until the very finish. Their 
antics on the harp and violin, particularly 
those of the fellow who played the latter 
instrument, kept the crowd laughing 
throughout. I- S. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 

(Continued from pas* U and to ») 



RIVERSIDE 

"An Artistic Treat," a finely mounted, 
artistically grouped and excellently exe- 
cuted posing act, opened the show and 
received about twice the usual amount of 
applause given an act in this position. 

Jimmy Fallon and Ross Brown, two re- 
turned soldiers, who bill themselves as 
star entertainers of the 27th Division, 
sang a song or two and told a few stories, 
the most of them new, and danced a bit 
for the finish 
' The Araaut Brothers, the fiddling 
downs, are by no means musical. Neither 
are they funny. But the combination of 
music and clowning was rewarded by some 
laughter and considerable applause at the 
act's finish. A bit of the acts of a half- 
dozen or more successful clowns of the 
past is incorporated into the Arnanfs of- 
fering, some of it being so old as to ap- 
pear' new to the average vaudeville patron. 

Vinie Daly, before a beautiful blue drop, 
attired in a striking blue costume and 
with a pianist to play her accompani- 
ments, combined popular songs with grand 
opera selections and,' to show her versa- 
tility, did a dance at the art's finish which 
brought her many recalls. Santuzza's 
Aria from "Cavalleria Rusticanna." was 
her best vocal selection. But the popular 
song, with its dance accompaniment, used 
for the closing, seemed best suited to the 
Riverside audience. 

Homer B. Mason and Marguerite Keeler 
are still showing the little travesty on the 
eternal triangle, an act which seems to be 
losing its previous entertaining value. 
Neither Mr. Mason nor Miss Keeler are, 
apparently, slowing up in their work in 
the little piece which, in spite of clever 
lines and some good situations did not go 
over nearly as well as it has done in the 
past. George E. Bomain, who is appearing 
as the Spaniard in the piece, does some 
excellent work. 

Topics of the Day opened after inter- 
mission, and was followed by Lois Jose- 
phine and Leo Henning, who are doing the 
gong and dance act previously shown by 
Josephine and Tyler Brooke. The act has 
not been improved by the change of males. 
Henning sings no better than Brooke, and 
does not compare with him as a dancer. 
Miss Josephine,- however, is excellent in 
the act, and did much to carry it over as 
a success. The Valentine number, as 
well as the bride and groom bit,' are ex- 
ceptionally good. One of the hits of the 
bill was scored. by the act. One or two 
of the old songs have been replaced by 
new and better melodies. 

The Lightner Sisters and Newton Alex- 
ander, on next to closing, scored the big 
applause hit of the bill with some new 
songs and well pot over comedy material 
that was handled by Winnie Lightner. 
The act seems to be running more to com- 
edy now than ever before, and as there 
is a scarcity of laugh- provoking acts. on 
the bill this week, it was welcome. Sev- 
eral bits, "however, although laugh-getters, 
should be eliminated, especially one piece 
done while Alexander is playing the piano. 
Away back in the days when Johnny 
Even was playing ball with the champion 
Cubs, he pulled the bit before a big crowd 
in the Polo Grounds stands, and Bill Klein, 
the umpire, catching a glimpse of it out 
of the corner of his eye, banished Evers 
from the game and grounds for the day. 

Jack Alfred and his two acrobatic as- 
sistants are closing the bill and, to then- 
credit, it must be said that they held the 
audience unto their final trick was" shown. 
The act, which in the past was seldom 
shown later than fourth on the bill, seems 
to have developed much entertaining 
strength in spite of the fact that a change 
in the men has not helped, in so far as 
the talking portion of the offering is con- 
cerned. W. V. 



ROYAL 

The Kennedys, Thomas and Gertrude, 
headed the bill in a routine of dances, 
done together. There waa one variation, 
probably an effort to include some comedy. 
The attempt fell flat and the portion 
centered about the shifting of the spot- 
light should be dropped. The dances 
are well done. At the Monday evening 
performance, the turn scored a big hit in 
the initial spot. 

Bert Howard moved up from the sixth 
peg on the program, chattered a bit and 
amused with his work upon the piano. A 
great deal of the talk is clever, but there 
are a few places where it slows up. How- 
ard's work on the piano won favor, his 
burlesque on the French pianist going 
especially well. 

Ruth Budd started as though she was 
going to offer a song act, but after one 
vocal number and a bit of a dance, in one, 
the drop was lifted, and, in full stage, 
she performed a number of startling feats 
upon a pair of flying rings. Miss Budd 
is a versatile young lady who has an act 
that is a genuine thriller. In the third 
position she scored one of the big hits of 
the bill, receiving a round of applause 
that was a veritable ovation. There -was 
a bit of strong- jaw work, and ' several 
stunts on a rope kept the spectators ex- 
cited. The offering is one that can hold 
its own in any house in almost any spot. 

Henry Sylvester and. Maids. Vance 
scored solidly with comedy talk and songs. 
Sylvester, a tall fellow, is clever, worked 
hard and provided the humor. He is a 
comedian of ability and put his gags and 
songs over with a genuine punch. The 
woman member of the duo won a hearty ■ 
round of applause for her rendition of a 
ballad. At the finish, they sang and 
danced together, making the usual de- 
parture for two. 

Eddie Foy and the Foylets amused the 
crowd with some talking and singing. 
Only six of the younger Foys were pres- 
ent, one of them, as Eddie explained in a 
curtain speech, still being in the navy. 
The older Foy has evidently gone into a 
sort of semi-retirement, for he now has 
very little to do in the act. The young- 
sters handle the bigger part of it, and do 
most creditably. ^Several special songs 
are included 'in the act, which holds inter- . 
est from beginning to end. 

Eddie and' Birdie Conrad opened after 
intermission and sang several songs from 
the pen of the male member of the duo. 
The two gave a clever performance, the 
male -member furnishing some comedy and 
the girl holding up her end efficiently. 
The offering, staged by William Rock, is 
sure fire throughout. 

Maryon Vadie and Ota Gygi, the for- 
mer one of the best dancers on the vaude- 
ville stage, and the bitter a violinist of 
remarkable ability, scored a hit with the 
greater part of the audience, bnt the gang 
which infests the balconies made a strong 
effort to detract Gygi's attention. It is 
time, that Manager Darling cleaned out 
the nest which this undesirable element 
has made for itself. The ignorant rabble 
should be escorted to the exits and forci- 
bly, if - necessary, ejected. Giggling and 
other sounds,- audible to at least one half 
of the audience, were much in evidence at 
one time: Vadie and Gygi form one of 
the best teams in vaudeville and the of- 
fering met with marked approval in spite 
of the annoyance. 

Burns and Frabito closed and held the 
crowd in until the finish. The boys are 
one. of. the best' wop comedy teams now 
appearing hereabouts, and although the 
act has been seen many times before, it 
still draws much laughter. The boys have 
a new act in preparation which they plan 
to show next season. I. S. 



EIGHTY-FIRST ST. 

The acts at this theatre played to » 
responsive house on Monday night. But 
the warm applause on the part of the 
audience showed no more than good judg- 
ment, for the bill was an excellent one. 

The bill opened with an educational film, 
followed by Delmar and Hole in "One- 
Summer Day," a novelty in pantomime. 
The team does not depend merely upon the 
novelty of their idea which, in itself, would 
very- likely get the act by, bnt goes further 
by patting considerable work and an abun- 
dance of originality into every acrobatic 
trick that they do. Every trick is executed 
as if its performance is as easy as rolling 
off a log. But the audience was quick to- 
realize that the feats were not as easy as 
they appeared and applauded warmly. The 
girl was always a picture of grace and the 
interpolated toe dance is at least worthy of 
'passing mention. 

George Ford and Flo Cunningham had 
an easy time of it in the next spot, scoring 
well with their opening business. Every- 
thing went well until Ford made quite a 
long speech about "mingling with, society." 
It was longer than it was funny or enter- 
taining, and the value of the act would be 
enhanced if this part of the turn were- 
eliminated. 

' lionise Carter and Company presented a 
dramatic playlet from Miss Carter's pen 
entitled "For Him.'' It is a story of a 
soldier's return from France, blind as the 
result of shellshock, and the clever way in 
which his mother succeeds in restoring his- 
sight and normal being to him, working 
on the theory that "it takes a shock to cure 
shellshock." The audience, knowing nothing 
of the mother's plan until her theory has 
proven successful at the anti-climax of the 
act, is treated to that surprise element 
which is so often strived for, but so seldom 
achieved, by the playwright. Louise Carter 
gives a splendid characterization of Mrs. 
O'Connor, the mother, ably supported by 
Bert Merling and Jean Selkirk, who play 
the son and the sweetheart, respectively. 

The applause for Lydia Barry was so- 
pronounced that it continued even, after 
the next act had been announced. Her act 
is the sort that would make an appeal to- 

any class of vaudeville audience bnt more 
particularly to an audience of Monday 
night's type. It was as if Miss Barry were 
having an evening at home at the Eighty- 
first 'Street Theatre and that the persons in 
the audience were her guests, listening to- 
the bright talk of their hostess,, The act, 
for the most part, allowed Mis* Barry to 
give. her idea of a vaudeville show a* she- 
claims to have dreamed of one after eating 
a Welsh rarebit In her : exaggerated im- 
personations she runs the gamut of variety 
acts, -the best take-offs being the juggler 
with the cigar boxes, the "posing ladies,"' 
and the triangle playlet. Her impersona- 
tion of a dainty miss was not up .to the 
standard of the rest of her take-offs. 

Going from the ridiculous to the sublime. 
Miss Barry sang an old negro song that she 
originally introduced- years ago when she- 
was in a show with/ her father, the famous 
William Barry. This bit received a good 
hand. But the part of the act that was 
most appreciated by the audience* waa 
where the actress got quite confidential 
with the audience and chatted nonchalantly 
about her clothes and other personal 
matters. 

Beth Stone- Armond and Company- pre- 
sented a number of original dances which 
will be more fully reviewed, under New 
Acta.. .The act opened weakly but warmed 
up as it progressed and its speed at the end- 
carried the vaudeville part of the bill to a- 
good finish. 

The show elosed with the Eighty-first 
Street Theatre's Semi-Weekly Pictorial, 
for which the big majority of the audience- 
waited. 

The feature film showed June El vidge in- 
the comedy drama, "Coax Me," and imme- 
diately preceded the act of Lydia Barry. 
-'•*■■■*■' ';--""' H. j. g. ■ 






August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




McVlCKERS 

(Chicago) 

Hip Raymond made a splendid opener 
with his droll and silent clown comedy. 
He does a lot of foolish things that are ex- 
pected from a clown, and which the public 
always like to see. His business in piling 
tables on top of each other ' is certainly 
amusing-. . He also sets considerable 
laughs out of the old, time-worn down gag 
of losing a finger. He then climbs to die 
top of the tables and swings to and fro, 
working the. audience up to a high tension 
until he' finally drops to the stage, finish- 
ing with a dance in one which went over 
Tery weH. 

Tbe Gypsy Revue, a company of men 
and women with special scenery of a gypsy 
camp, opened their offering with a little 
song and music. They then went in for 
Russian dancing, single, double and group, 
and forming many pretty pictures. The 
scenery could be retouched, as it looks as 
though it had been through a hard season. 
The offering went fairly well. 

Bennington and Scott, man and woman, 
opened with a neat song and dance in 
white costume. The male member displays 
ability in dancing and high kicking. The 
lady makes a pleasant appearance and her 
assistance handled with plenty of life, 
helped put them over in grand style. 

The Karl Eugene troupe of acrobats do 
some excellent work. Their makeup, in 
tights, is clean, and their appearance re- 
freshing. The part is a combination of 
hand to hand balancing, ground tumbling 
and acrobatics. Ifs a good lively act from 
start to finish, and went like wildfire. 

Dudley Douglas, a singing comedian, who 
has a good line of comedy songs and poses, 
knows the art. of delivering them in an able 
manner. He injects a few lines of comedy 
talk after each number and proved to be 
entertaining throughout the entire act 

The Berlo Girls are six shapely young- 
sters; one of whom opens the act with a 
neat song in one. Daring the song the 
curtain "rises and the other members of 
the act are discovered in several poses sur- 
rounding a tank, in which they perform 
difficult feata in the way of fancy diving. 
They are very graceful at all times, and 
at the finish, an old lady leaves the audi- 
ence after discovering that the girls are 
her daughters and raising a short rumpus. 

The Saxaphone Girls, four is all, have a 
well 'selected programme of pretty num- 
bers, one especially, played by one of the 
young- ladies, the old time songs which Ray- 
mond '-'Moore, the silver voiced tenor; 'sang 
and made popular many years ago, "Down 
On the Farm," went over big, and judging 
from the way this number went the public 
still appreciates some of the oldtime popu- 
lar songs. They followed with other solos 
and finished with a splendid international 
march, sending them away to liberal ap- 
plause. 

Keane and Walsh, two young men in 
very neat attire, entertained with a rou- 
tine of comedy talk. One of the young 
men renders an Irish song and recitation 
which hits home, and followed with . the 
other doing a soft shoe dance, a little more 
talk and two songs for a finish they went 
exceptionally well, and were deserving of 
their reward. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



(Costtinuad from pares 11 aad 12) 



WOODS SIGNS MORE WRITERS 

A. H. Woods has signed contracts with 
several more playwrights by which he 
gets control of their work for five years. 
ITiey.are Bayard Veillier, Willard Mack, 
Wilson Collinson, Ralph E. Dyar and 
Marjorie Blaine, all of whom have signed 
five-year contracts. . 

STORM DAMAGES THEATRE 

A' terrific windstorm which blew off the 
roof of Tom Coyne's Clinton Theatre at 
'Camp Mills, Long Island, has put a dent 
in soldier theatricals there for a while. 
The wind also blew down all the electric 
poles, destroying the feed wire and cut- 
ting off Illumination. 



KEENEVS 

Mile. Verara. a violinist, opened the show 
with an offering that was received with 
favor. She is a capable violinist and confines 
herself almost entirely to the classics. She 
played one lively tone, bnt that her last 
number, for an encore she played "Kiss Me 

Frlsche and Qrossman, billed as comedian 
song writers, may be song writers of ability. 
But their title to be called comedians Is not 
so clearly established. They both have ro- 



bust voices and plenty of pep. so they scored 
a hit. They saDg several of their own com- 
positions and ended with a medley of popular 



aang bits they had written. There were one 
or two bits of hokum that did go over for 
large laughs, but the comedy as a whole was 
rather lax. 

Adonis and Company, the latter consisting 
of a well trained canine, offered a rather 
novel acrobatic act. Adonis performed sev- 
eral difficult balancing stunts and some good 
hand stands. He also pat the doc through 
his paces and concluded by suspending him- 
self from a chandelier, with his weight on 
one arm, and whirling around In that posi- 
tion. He scored. 

Hearst-Pathe offered an Interruption. 

Weston and Eilane. In a comedy act which 
thev call "At tbe Cabaret," resumed the 
vaudeville and scored hugely with their ho- 
kum. Tbe girl is supposed to be a war stamp 
salesgirl, and her efforts to get a "hard 
boiled egg" to buy are laughable. Of course, 
she has to succeed. Then comes a song with 
comedy bits, and, for a climax, they gave 
their impression of a typical East Side couple 
entering a cabaret. what happened after 
they sot in kept the folks laughing all the 
time. 

"Married Via Wireless," a musical comedi- 
etta, with some clever scenic and electrical 
effects thrown in for good measure, followed 
them. The story Is of a wireless operator 
who wishes to marry the daughter of his 
captain. Refusal, of course. They are mar- 
ried, anyhow, and the captain gives bis 
blesslneand forgiveness. All then ends hap- 
pily. The parts of the steward and stew- 
ardess were handled by a pair of nut com- 
edy specialists and got many laughs. 

Morey. Senna and I«e will be further re- 
viewed under "New Acts." 

Geo. N. Brown and Billy Weston closed 
the show with their walking exhibition, 
which resulted In a tie. The folks stayed to 
see the match. 

"Men, Women and Money" was the fea- 
ture. - S. K. 



VICTORIA 

(Last Half) 

The Two White Steppers, a lady and man 
who wear nothing but white costumes 
throughont their clog dancing act, received 
a good measure of applause from an audi- 
ence which Oiled every seat In this theatre 
despite the evening's rain. 

Conroy and O Donnell. one working In 
black-face, were amusing at times, as a couple 
of letter carriers wbo tali to one another and 
also sing. Their quips were good, even though 
some of them did sound ss though very old. 
Their singing wss marked by tbe fine tone 
of voice in which the one In black-face sang. 
This same member of the duo was chiefly re- 
sponsible for tbe humor the act contained. 

Faber and McGowan may be described as a 
nifty pair who sing, dance and talk In becom- 
ing fashion. A vermilion-nued silt skirt, worn 
by the girl of this pair, was quite in accord 
with tbe burlesque show girl type she de- 
pleted in tbe early part of their offering. Her 
partner Is a dapper young fellow with a, 
rather thin voice, who exhibited a good sense 
of comedy values. Their act was decidedly 
meritorious. 

Dave Harris placed himself In the honor 
niche of this program. He sings sweetly, does 
Dave, for his Is a lyrical tenor voice that Is 
eminently suited to the graceful manner in 
which he puts over a song. He confines him- 
self strictly to popular songs of the day, run- 
ning . the gamut from simple ballad to a 
shimmy, and finishing with a popular Chinese 
number. The number was called "Chung," 
and Harris was called upon for encores. But 
be failed to respond. 

Herbert Brooks and Company is Just Her- 
bert Brooks, assisted, inconsequentially, by a 
young lad*/ who caused admiration and envy 
by reason of tbe fulsomeness of her hair, 
which she wore in a long braid. Brooks is a 
deft manipulator of cards and what adds to 
the entertaining value of his act is the sense 
of humor that he displays throughont. For 
his talk is glib and spontaneous. 

At the finish, be has himself packed and 
apparently securely encased In a nickel-steel 
casket from which he manages to escape al- 
most as quickly as the casket Is shut out from 
the view of the audience. This rather old 
prestidigitator's stunt is done by Brooks ef- 
fectively and tended to arouse an appreciative 
amount of bewilderment. Brooks has a One 
closing art. ' M. L. A. 



AUDUBON 

(Last Half) 

Tbe show was opened by Leslie and Pa- 
galla, in a novelty cycling turn. The brunt 
of the work falls on the man and he bore It 
bravely. The woman assisted him capably 
and tbey scored a hit In the opening position. 

The . news reel, for some reason or other, 
was shown next. 

Dorothy and . Boater, In a "kid" singing 
and dancing act, were second. They opened 
with a kid love song and followed with a 
number of songs that bore on their life aa 
the pets of the family. Then then deviated 
and sang several straight song numbers. They 
have pleasing voices and dance rather neatly- 
All In all, the act la an entertaining bit of 
work and they scored a hit. They had to 
respond to an encore. 

Anthony and Rogers, In an Italian comedy 
act which much resembles several other Ital- 
ian comedy acts, followed. They have, a 
funny line of talk and several bits of busi- 
ness were put over neatly. Their imitations, 
by means of- dance steps, won laughter 
aplenty and they had to respond to several 
encores. They scored a large bit. 

Guy and Pearl Magley, In a dancing act, 
came next. Tbey carry special scenery end 
have appropriate costumes for every number 
they do. The act opens with a scene In 
Cblna. The girl Is reading and the man Is 
listening to some Chinese victrola record. 
She takes exception to his choice and puts 
on a fox trot. He is forced to dance with 
her. 

Next comes a dance of grandmother's days, 
in which they both did very well. Their last 
and best Is a sort of waits In which they 
do several trick steps. Their finish is sen- 
sational. She lays across his shoulders and 
be whirls ber around without any means of 
balance. She Just lays across his baek .and 
he whirls, that's all. They scored tremen- 
dously. 

Crawford and Broderlck, In their comedy 
patter and singing, came after them. These 
two performers have been doing this act for 
years and it is still good for laughs. Their 
talk concerns mostly one another, and that 
ever bandy topic, marriage. Tbey sang a 
song- or two, and danced a few steps which 
sent them off to a bit. They declined an 
encore. 

Tbe Old Homestead Eight, a singing set, 
closed the show. The men In this act have 
good voices and their numbers are well 
chosen with the exception of "Tosti's Good-' 
bye." This number was never Intended for, 
anything but a solo or a duet, and when they 
sang It as an octette, they Just killed it. They 
scored a bit. though. 

"Mary Began" was the feature. S. K. 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Last Half) 

Wools and Patterson offered a song and 
dance act which lacked the much necessary 
vim, vigor and vitality. The singing was of 
the usual small time standard and the danc- 
ing showed little. The turn is much faster 
toward the. finish than at the start, which Is 
entirely too alow. 

Copeland and McKlaatck, colored comedians, 
sang, talked and danced. The turn will' be 
folly reviewed In the New Act Department. 

"The Cat" a comedy playlet was presented 
by a cast of three, a man and two women, 
and held interest It will also be reviewed 
under New Acts. 

Bernard and Merrltt two girls, opened with 
an accordeon duo, playing a medley of popu- 
lar melodies. One of tbe doo then sang a well 
known selection, showing little out of tbe 
ordinary In ber delivery of It One of tbe 
girls later played- the saxophone and tbey 
concluded with a saxophone and accordeon 
duo. There Is nothing very unusual about 
either the playing or singing. The turn will 
do on the small time, but Is not likely to 

reach anything better. 

Emily Darrell came out followed by a bull 
up. and talked to the orchestra leader and 
be audience. She has a clever Una of charter 
which, while lacking In one or two spots. Is 
very cleverly bandied and used to the best ad- 
vantage. 

Andrew Mack closed with bis songs and 
stories. He led off with a song which ex- 
pressed tbe sentiment that returning service 
men should receive their jobs back followed 
by some stories. . His voice is as p least on as 



B 



ever and was appreciated. 



I. B. 



CONEY SETS MARDI CRAS DATE 

After a meeting of the Coney Island 
Carnival Company last week, it was defi- 
nitely announced that a "Mardi Gras" 
would be held as usual this year. The 
festivities win last from September 15 
to September 20, and there win be parades 
each night excepting the last one. ■ On 
the last day, the. afternoon will be given 
over to the amusement of children. 



FIFTH AVENUE 

(Last Half) 

' Thursday afternoon was one of the bleak 
kind that comes before a rain and a large 
crowd filled tbe house In anticipation of 
some good entertainment. It must nave been 
. an off day tor everyone or something, for all 
of the seats were occupied, as well aa soma 
of the standing room. 

The bill was an ordinary one, which start- 
ed very slowly, but picked up a bit as time 
went on. Tbe crowd, however, was In a 
receptive mood and wanted Its money** 
worth, with the result that much applause 
was audible. At that tbe Fifth Avenue audi- 
ence always waa a soft one. 

Henry and Adelaide started with a song 
and dance act. The girl sang, tbe man 
danced, and then both did some stepping 
together. The dancing was fair, one novel 
number being Included. Tbe sin ging was an 
atrocity. See New Acts for a 'full review 
of tbe offering. 

Wbitledge and Beckwlth, two men. played 
two pianos and Included some talk. The 
spectacle of the two men playing the larga 
Instruments proved to be an Interesting one. 
Some of the playing was good, but the talk- 
ing showed about aa much speed as a cart 
hone which has had its legs amputated. The 
rendition of a klaa song was original. 

Duffy and Caldwell, man and woman, talked 
and sang. Tbey are a clever duo wbo will la 
time brush up the rough spots In the turn 
and then have a first-rate comedy act The 
dialogue seems to lsg toward the end. With 
that remedied, the turn will be vastly Im- 
proved. 

Helen Gleason and company offered! a 
sketch which takes place In one of tbe rooms 
of a steamship, wherein are Included twin 
beds. The crowd expected a bedroom play- 
let, bnt got something clean,- Instead, The 
conclusion comes suddenly and furnishes a 
good Sassana to an interesting offering. 

Leon Varvara scored a hit of plentiful pro- 
portions with his piano act A bit of talk 
wss Included and delivered In a voice dim- 
cult to hear. His playing struck home and 
Varvara could have taken an encore. 

Marshall Montgomery knows all there Is 
to know about ventriloquism. He held in- 
terest throughout winning applause for tbe 
many clever bits Included. The whistling 
finish waa a hit and he had to repeat It 

The Dixie Duo, Slssle and Blake, scored 
the big applause hit of the bill. They are 
a clever pair and tbelr work la really enter- 
taining. A descriptive number by the late 
Jim Europe Is one of tbe features of the turn 
which lacks a weak spot 

Jack Wyatt and His Lads and Lassies pre- 
sented a melange of Scotch entertainment 
There wss singing, dancing and, of course, 
some playing on bagpipes, without which few 
Scotch acts are complete. Tbe offering mad* 
a strong closing act and held the crowd until 
the finish, which consisted of a medley of 



songs, most of them well known. 



I. 8. 



AMERICAN ROOF 

(Last Half) 

Chrystle and Byan opened the show with 
a song and dance act in which they dis- 
played no unusual ability to do either, al- 
though tbey worked bard to put their ma- 
terial over and succeeded In making a alt. 

Ellison and Brown, colored funsters, got 

many laughs with Uielr cross-fire remarks. 
Tbelr talk centers chiefly around the racs 
track. A picture la shown of a supposed 
race on which the comedian loses all bis 
money. They closed with a parody. 

Scanlon. Dennos and Scanlon, on third, 
will be given a further review under New 
Acts. 

Chas. Reilly, character comedian, followed 
them. He bas added a lot of new gaga to 
his act and they went over la great style. 
He sings several Irish numbers In a pleasing 
tenor voice, and his Jewish parody wss re- 
ceived with favor. He had to respond to an 
encore, but declined a second one. 

The Seven Glasgow Maids, In a Scotch 
singing, dancing and musical act. fallowed 
him. They offered a number of Scotch songs, 
dances snd selections. A hit was theirs for 
the asking and tbey bad to respond to two 
encores. The lassie that played the ' 



drum was the bit of tbe act 

Following Intermission, G oldie and Ward, 
boy and girl act sang and danced to a hit 
For a further review see New Acts. 

Dare Austin and Company. In a comedy 

Elaylet entitled "His Wedding Morn." won 
raghs easily. Austin is, evidently, an Eng- 
lish comedian, for be has a pronounced Eng- 
lish sccent. His efforts are very funny for 
he has combined the quiet English style of 
fun making with the swifter method used la 
this country. 

' U Wolfe Gilbert, song writer par excel- 
lence, not only scored a huge hit but sang 
two brand new songs that be had lust writ? 
ten. Gilbert couldn't give the audience 
enough of bis songs. He bad to beg off la 
tbe face of Insistent clamors for more. 

Leo Zarrell and company closed the show 
and scored a hit that would make many aa 
acrobatic blue with envy. The folks opened 
up and applauded generously for every stunt 
tney performed. 

Pictures concluded tbe bill. 8. K. 

. ',. ■- ■- * ., 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 




BILLDOOLEY . 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. ' 

Stylo — Singing, 

Time— Fourteen minu t e*. 

Setting — In one. 

Bill Dooley, formerly of BUI and Jed 
Dooley, and Dooley and Nelson, la now 
presenting a single which consist* mainly 
of bits of the old act The offering in- 
cludes some Bjnging, talking, dancing 
and a few rope spinning stunts. 

There is a lack of unity in the act, 
however, Dooley wandering from one 
type of entertainment to another in a 
sort of haphazard manner. # Some pat- 
. ter is included, moat of it coupled with 
the rope-spinning portion. Dooley should 
change this as soon as possible, for the 
gags used are as old am the proverbial 
hills. That about the Englishman who 
thought that the base b all score was up 
in the millions certainly smacks of the 
vintage of abont '98. 

Another thing which might be men- 
tioned is the lack of a punch. The torn, 
generally, seems to have abont aa much 
kick as a warm bottle of Bevo. 

Dooley's dancing is fully np to the 
mark, and easily the best part of the 
act. Be is a performer who, if teamed 
with the proper partner, could score a 
big hit in vaudeville, but does not show 
to best advantage, aa a single. 

Starting with a yodling song, fairly 
well done, Dooley went into a dance ex- 
ecuted in fine fashion. Then came the 
Chinese bit in which he sang a tune pos- 
sessing the flavor of the Far Bast, put- 
ting on meanwhile a Chinese costume. 
With the pigtail adorning his cranium, 
he did an eccentric dance which had a 
few difficult steps. The rope spinning 
part which came next slowed up the 
act considerably. There was an an- 
nounced imitation of Fred Stone doing a 
rope-spinning dance. More patter was 
expounded by Dooley as he again slipped 
into, evening dress and the audience slept 
while he delivered a few veterans of the 
variety stage. An imitation of Bernard 
Granville doing a drunk dance dosed. 
* It Dooley could bring the rest of the 
act up to the standard of his d a ncin g 
he would be sure of success. His pres- 
ent material ia the worst sort of a 
handicap. He can do much better with 
live, up-to-date matter. I. S. 



NEW ACTS AND REAPPEARANCES 



THE BRAMINOS 

Theatre— -Proctor** Twemty-Oird St. 

Style — Musical novelty. ■"■■ 

Time — Eleven minutes. 

Setting— FvU stage. 

Musical clowns are again coming back 
into their own and this turn is one of 
the type popular a decade ago, which 
should surely be a most welcome offer- 
ing now. The idea ia not at all new, 
hut it ia such a long time since an act 
of this sort has been presented that it 
can be booked in on any first class bill 
aa an opening turn and make a most 
creditable impression. 

Tne men make their entrance singing 
a number and then go into a dance. 
This ia not a fast or snappy opening 
and should receive a little strengthening. 
Then they" do a . whistling duet, the 
whistles being concealed in their gloves. 
. This number went over big. 

Following this they do a pinochle 
game bit with bells, which ia also very 
entertaining. Then comes ' a clarinet 
double, which is followed by a little 
melody emitted from a milk and whiskey 
bottle. It gets a big laugh. One of the 
men does an accordion solo, after which 
a baas xylophone specialty ia rendered. 
They then pnt on their musical over- 
coats and play a tune on instruments 
hidden In the pockets. 

Following that the concluding number 
ia done. It ia a grotesque bride and 
groom feature that affords a number of 
good laughs. 



HENRI SCOTT 

Theatre — Proctor' t Mount Vernon. 

Style — Singing. 

Time— Ten minutes. 

Setting— FuU stage. 

An artistic basso, possessed of a voice 
of power and pleasing qualities, Henri 
Scott has jumped from the grand opera 
stage to that of the variety theatre. He 
was with the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany last season and sang in several 
roles with that organization. 

Scott, however, has very wisely 
avoided selections that would tend to 
bore vaudeville audiences. His reper- 
toire, a very short one, is made up of 
' melodies of simplicity and those readily 
understood. Straightforward, polite and 
presenting a neat appearance, he should 
have little trouble in the best of vaude- 
ville theatres. 

Attired in the costume of Mephis- 
topheles, the .famous devil of "Faust," 
Scott made a rather sudden entrance, 
singing a song from that opera. He fol- 
lowed with a abort talk, removing the 
costume, and stepping forward in even- 
ing attire. The fact that he had sung 
with the Metropolitan was ' judiciously 
mentioned by him, and he lightly re- 
marked that Geraldine Farrar was also 
a member of that company, with the re- 
sult that the crowd was gr e atly over- 
awed. Scott spoke of "Carmen" as his 
favorite opera and sang the well known 
Toreador's song, having previously ren- 
dered a lofty American air. An encore 
was demanded and he complied by sing- 
ing "On the Road to Mandalay." 

With the encore included, the turn 
runs but ten minutes, which ia entirely 
too short. He could easily add one or 
two selections and still score strongly. 
Scott's vaudeville debut was a success. 

I. S. 



EDMUNDS AND SEIGAL 

Theatre— Harlem Opera Bouse. 
Style — Comedy. 

Time — Ttoen ty-ttco minutes. 
Setting— One. 

There is only one fault with this act 
and that is the people in it They work 
as though they were graduates of one of 
those correspondence schools of acting. 

The man makes many attempts at be- 
ing funny and the woman an effort to 
sing. ! Both these expenditures of energy 
are pitiful wastes of time, and besides, 
whafs the use of exerting one's self so 
needlessly. They can't perform, they 
have no personality, they have poor ma- 
terial. The only good thing in the act 
is the "tough" dance at the end. De- 
spite this, they will die standing up in 
every house they show in, unless they 
cut out all the talk, attempts at sing- 
ing, and stick to dances entirely. May- 
be they'll get by then. S. K. 



•TOOT SWEET" QUARTET 

Theatre — Yonkert. 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting — Three and one. 

The four men who comprise this act 
are all service men, two of them being 
doughboys, and two petty officers in the 

•. Navy. They have' real good, voices, 
which blend harmoniously. And, very 
wisely, they have chosen numbers that 
give. plenty of chance to harmonize. The 
act opens with an ensemble number 
which is followed by a number of popn- 

. lar selections, each of which is intro- 
duced by another of the men. 
- These boys have all the. requirements 
for success on the big time, and a few 
weeks should see them there. S- K. 



Mr. AND MRS. HILL AND CO. 

Theatre — American. 
Style — Comedy playlet. 
Time — Tvrenty-two minute*. 
Setting— Full stage. 

After playing in the sketch, "What 
Every Man Needs" for more than four 
yean, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hill have 
changed their vehicle. "Poor Old Jim" 
is the title of the new playlet. That Is, 
it is new to them, but waa formerly of- 
fered by tie late Joseph Jefferson. A 
third character assists them, playing the 
role of the doctor and holds his end of 
it up fairly well. The principals do 
well and Hill has an interesting role. ' 

The playlet is* rather fanciful, but the 
performers save it by keeping up a light 
manner. Hill has the leading part and 
delivers his lines cleverly most of the 
time, although on a few occasions he ap- 
peared to get the wrong meaning out of 
them. As it is, however, the act will 
. find little trouble on the better small 
time, where good sketches are a rarity. 
This one is above the average. 

The playlet deals with a married man 
who, although he has promised to stop 
drinking on repeated occasions, continues 
to visit bis club and come home in an 
intoxicated manner. As the curtain 
rises, Jim is seen in an unconventional 
position on a couch, sleeping 'off the ef- 
fects of alcoholic potations. He mur- 
murs somewhat incoherently, and his 
wife, who enters, is angry. A doctor 
■ enters and attempts to sober Jim, still 
reclining on the couch. 

It is then decided by the wife and 
doctor to make Jim believe he is his own 
ghost and tell him of his wrongdoings. 
The door of his study is locked and a 
letter, addressed to his mother-in-law, 
stating that he has passed away, is glued 
to the desk. 

_ Upon awaking, he sees his wife sob- 
bing and hears her constantly referring 
to- "Poor Old Jim." - He is ignored and 
avoided. So well do the wife and doc- 
tor play their trick that he soon begins 
to believe himself his own ghost. 

There are several very interesting sit- 
uations in this,, well played for the 
greater part Of course, he finally de- 
cides to do without bis fire-water in the 
future and there is a happy ending. . 

; X- S.- .' • 



WHITELEDGE & BECKWITH 

Theatre — Jersey City: 
Styles— Pianotogue: - 
Time — Thirteen i minutes. 
Setting— One. 

This is a western two men piano turn, 
in which grand and upright instruments 
are used. The boys- have the proper 
conception as to what is desired in East- 
ern houses and do. their work with' a 

win. 

Their opening ia a popular medley of 
the sure-fire type and it gets them un- 
der way nicely. Bectwith then plays 
. "Mighty Lak a Rose," in the manner 
that Liszt would have done it, and also 
in "Jan". style. This went over big. 

Whitledge then - comes along and tells 
a few stories. That part of the act 
should be eliminated, as he is suffer- 
ing from, the same fault aa a number of 
others who attempt to give "dialect?* im- 
pressions. This part of the act ia un- 
necessary and' sort of takes the edge 
off of the turn. The boys then rag the 
scale and finish with a "Jazz" medley. 

This pair are capita] pianists and 
should find little trouble in navigating 
the better class of theatre courses. ■ 
. '.. . . A.TJ. 



THECAT? 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 
Stylo— Comedy playlet. 
Time—Tventy-tvo minute*. 
Setting— FuU mage. 

Woven, around a good theme, but 
worked out in a poor manner, "The Oat" 
may hold interest. It Is presented by s 
cast of three, a man and two women, 
none of whom ia featured. 

The offering is, in fact, very crude. 
The dramat'ic efforts of the company 
seem to lack that oft referred to "some- 
thing." Their delivery is not very good, 
and unless it improves, the offering will 
stay on the small time. Slides that are 
twice flashed upon the screen have been 
made in a rush apparently, for they have 
been scrawled in rude characters and de- 
tract from any attractiveness the turn 
otherwise possesses. . ■ - 

The playlet deals with a young couple, 
Just after their honeymoon. In comes 
a lady friend who does her. best to shake 
the young bride's confidence in her' hus- 
band. Her general demeanor instantly 
suggests that she is the "cat" who givea 
the playlet its title. Said cat puffs at 
a cigarette and suggests that young 
bride do the same. Later she does try 
to puff it, coughs and gives it up. 

Hubby then comes in and agrees to 
take home the "cat," Mrs. Hammer, by 
n a m e, in bis car, she having missed her 
train. As the two leave, wifey takes a 
cigarette and smokes it "Oar" had pre- 
viously told her it would broaden her 
imagination. .*....■ 

Then comes a slide which explains 
that three months have gssassi and the 
home scene is different "Cat" it ap- 
pears, has stayed at the home for three 
months and hubby is showering his at- 
tentions upon her. She has practically 
disrupted the little family. 

Wifey is totally ignored. She becomes 
desperate and orders "cat" out of the 
house. Hubby decides to go -with her. 
Young wife warns him that he will re- 
gret it enters her own room and two 
pistol shots are beard. Dramatic mo- 
- ment Wifey rushes in and remarks 
that she has caused blowouts on two 
of the tires on hubby's ear. Curtain. 
Slide says, in rhyme that next scene 
win explain it 

Next, scene shows that all was ajdream 
on the part of the young wife whose im- 
agination waa broadened by the: dgar- 
i ette. .A few remarks- and .the curtain 
falls, for good this time. J .• l£ S- 



BENVENUTO DUO* - 

Theatre— Prootor>» Fifty-eighth St. " 
Style — Singing. 
Time — Fourteen minute*. 
Setting— In two. 

The Benvennto Duo are. a man and 
woman combination who render several 
classical arias. The man ia a tenor and 
the woman a* soprano. There -is noth- 
ing startling about the offering, which 
. is like very many others of its kind. Sev- 
eral of the selections are wen. done, 
. others not so well. But, generally, the 
turn may be caned a good small time 
act 

- They led off with a "Night in Venice" 
number, followed by a difficult piece by 
the woman. The first melody might have 
been sung to better effect as wen aa 
the second, which at times only, waa net 
so weU executed. The prayer piece by 
the man was preceded by a few explana- 
tory words. That portion of "n Trova- 
tore" where Leonora drinks the poison 
concluded; -and both the man sad woman 
sang wen. The dosing number. elicited 
a hearty round of applause. • 

The turn opened the show at this 
bouse, a bad spot for it I. S. 

ARGONNE FIVE GET LOEW TIME 
The Argonne Five have been booked to 
play the entire Loew time by Bob Baker. 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 



fa in br 
Published by the 



Orland W. Vaaghan. . . .President and Secretary 
Frederick C Mailer » Tr 

1604 Broadway, New York 
Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 

ORLAND W. VAUGHAN. EDITO R 
Ptal C Sweinhsrt, Managing Editor 



NEW YORK, AUGUST 6, 1919. 



Entered Jane 24, 1879, at the Feat Office at 
New York, N. Y., aa second class matter, un- 
der the act of March 3, 1879. 

TEE CLIPPER is iaracd every WEDNESDAY. 
Forma Close on Monday at 5 P. M. 



One year, in advance, $4; an* months, $2: 
tkree months, $1. Canada and foreign postage, 
extra. Single copiea will be tent, postpaid, on 
receipt of 10 etna, 

ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON 
APPLICATION 



Ckacags Office— Room 841, State Lake Bid*. 

Hamy F. Boss, y.»«— 

Saa Francisco Office— 830 Market St. 

R. Cohen, Mwiiirt, 



Addren All Communications to. 

THE NEW YORK CUTTER 

lew Braalwagr, New York 

Reliefer ed Cable AdJrm, "AoTHtarrr." 



rnminiu for the property which eoat them 
less than two "«"""■" • 

"FTJn wma the guiding genius which de- 
veloped the present Longaere section . 
which might now be named ap p ropriately 
Hammerstein Square. 

There waa also a simplicity about his 
mode of living that characterized this 
extraordinarily versatile individual as 
one who was, least of all, concerned with 
the tawdry splendors of existence. An 
apartment designed for his use in the 
Manhattan Opera House and luxuriously 
furnished by bis sons, he never occupied. 
He preferred his old rooms in the loft of 
the victoria Theatre. Here he hied him- 
self following the opening performance of 
grand . opera at the Manhattan Opera 
House in 1906. 

Life was full for Oscar Hammerstein. 



The Currsa caic bs obtaimb vholbuu aa* 
UTAH* at our agent*. Gorringc American New, 
Afettcy, 17 Green Street, Oiirlns Grass Road. 
London, W. C. England; Brentaao'a News De- 
pot. 37 Avenne de POpera, Paris. France: Gor- 
don & Gotch, 123 Pitt Street, Sydney, N. S. W., 
Australia. 



HAMMERSTEIN, THE GENIUS 

Just like a story from Horatio Alger! 
Jr., is the life of Oscar Hammerstein. The 
boy who ran away from his home in Ger- 
many and came here to work in a cigar 
factory for two dollars a week, invented 
labor-saving devices while he was em- 
ployed there. Then we find him editing 
a tobacco trade journal. He also wrote 
farces, playlets, musical plays and an 
opera. He became a theatrical manager, 
a producer, a builder of theatres and 
'finally a grand opera impreasario. And, 
as such, he built three grand opera houses 
in this country and one in London. 

His life was crowded with success and 
failure*.' Always: 'up and always doing, 
was Oscar Hammerstein, who lived ■'be- 
yond the three score and ten period. ' :: U« 
dreamed no idle dreams, this '-'master 
builder. When he-had finished with one 
project he went into another. When fail- 
ure resulted from, his efforts it meant 
nothing to him What he had in mind to 
do had" to he finished. 

But whether it was vaudeville or grand 
opera, he never seemed satisfied with the 
success he attained in these fields. There 
was in him that indomitable urge to do 
more and more of the thine he was doing. 

There was that about his personality 
also, that made one think of him as a 
sort of theatrical GU Bias. Lake that 
famous character in French fiction, he 
aimed for the stars, but always fell short 
of the mark. Still, Oscar Hammerstein 
was a genius whose theatrical and oper- 
atic activities were epochal. And when 
the history of the theatre in this country 
of the last twenty -five years is written, 
he will be reckoned as one of the trium- 
virate that contributed most to the de- 
velopment of the theatre during that 
period, the other -two being the late 
Charles Frohman and. David Belaseo. 

Vision he had aplenty. He was the first 
theatrical man to invade Harlem and 
build a theatre above 110th street. This 
house was called the Columbia, and is 
bow known aa Proctor's. He crossed the 
then 'dead line" at Forty second street 
and built the two houses now known aa 
the Criterion and New York theatres, 
which, subsequently passed from his con- 
trol into the hands of KJaw and Erlanger, 
who have since refused three and a half 



CLAIM CRAZY QUILT IDEA 

Editor New York Cutter: 

Dear Sir: "Ina Williams t h * nlr « Blanche 
Merrill for conceiving the idea of the 
crazy quilt song." 

Blanche Merrill is not the originator. 
We are the original Crazy Quilts, origin- . 
ators of the Crazy Quilt song, dance, talk, 
scenery, dress, and all Crazy Quilt ma- 
terial, which is fully protected. 

We consider this a deliberate lift. Hop- 
ing you will give this space in your paper, 
we remain, Yours truly, 

THE ORIGINAL CRAZY QUILTS. 

Mason City, Iowa, Jury 31, 1919. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Paul Dresser starred fn "A Green Goods 
Man." 

Mile. Pilar-Marin opened at Keith's The- 
atre, Boston- 
Joe La -Flour was with the Gus Hill 
New York Stars. 

"Madeline, or the Magic Kiss" was pro- 
duced at the Tremont, Boston, -with 
Camille IVArville, Chas. Dickson, Laura 
Joyce Bell and George Boniface, Jr., in the 
cast. 

The Rice and Barton shows included 
Frankie Haines, Washburn Sisters, Jay 
Quigley, La Porte Sisters, John J. and 
Lillian. Black, Clara Laurence, Crawford 
and Manning, Susie Moore, Whitney 
Brothers, J. Herbert Mack, Miller Sisters, 
Morton and Eckhoff, Frank Emerson, 
Grace Milburn, Carl F. Williams, Ruth 
Deshon, W. H. Isham, J. H. Barnes and 
Geo. B. Chandler. - 



Answers to Queries 



Q. N— Al H. Wilson is one of the oldest 
performers on the stage today. 

D. G. H.— Tony Pastor's was in its prime 
during the decade from 1870 on. 

R. D.— Harry Al ward did advance work 
for David Warfield several years ago. 

. . ... "» ^ • . \. at:: 

F. D. H.— The site now occupied by the 
Rialto was once Ham.msrstears Victoria. 

D. B.— Tom Meehan is a picture actor. 
Tea, he did at one time support Olga Pe- 
trova. 



G. D. — Alice Fleming was hurt in 1917 
as the result of a fall in the Hotel Knick- 
erbocker. 



M. B — Yes, Fred Stone did an ice-skat- 
ing specialty in bis "Jack O' Lantern" 
production. 

T. B- B.— Babe LaTour is a burlesque 
actress, hut for several seasons she has 
been in vaudeville. 



G. H. E.— Barry Lawrence was seen with 
the Happy" Lou Whitney Stock Company 
aa l+erltrtg man in 1917. 

A, B.— Walter F. Keefe is now a book- 
ing manager for Pantagea. He was for- 
merly with Marcos Loew. 

H. J.— Clara Ward was the Princess da 
Chimay. Bigo hi now playing the Moss 
time. Ask Bigo about Oat 



R. B- E.— FriUi Scheff is Viennese by 
birth. She has appeared in musical com- 
edy, and grand opera as well 

F. L. A. — Am unable to furnish the 
address of Louis Ancker. Write him a 
letter in care of The Clipper. 

J. A. G. — You can address John Mc- 
Cormack in care of his manager, Charles 
U Wagner, No. 611 Fifth avenue, New 
York. — 



H. P. B— Mrs. A H. Woods was on the 
stage under the name of Louise Beaton. 
She played the leading role in "Rachel 
Goldstein." 



B. D. — Harry Shea- once handled the 
Sunday night concerts at the Winter Gar- 
den. Rufus Le Maire also booked them 
for a time. 



P. D. — There are not two published 
songs out -under the title of "Smiles," at 
least we have not heard of them. Do not 
know J. Devlin. 



K. R. T.— Mabel Withee was seen in the 
prima donna role in "Robinson Cruso, Jr.," 
in which Al Jolson starred, when it was 
presented in Chicago. 

T. J. C— The Dolly Sisters are both 
married. Jean Schwartz and Harry Fox. 
A H. Woods starred them about two 
years ago in "His Bridal Night." 

D. K. 0.— The two most famous cabarets 
on Broadway are Rector's and Churchill's. 
It's hard to say which is the more famous. 



, H. H. — Charles Crowl was booking man- 
ager for the Butterfield Circuit when he 
married Sylvia Evelyn at Aurora, HI. She 
was formerly an actreatv 

F. 0. Y.— Walker Whiteside was con- 
sidered by some critics at one time the 
greatest actor of Oriental roles. He ap- 
peared in "The Typhoon." 

H. H. M. — Cappa never was leader or 
bandmaster of the 22nd Regiment Band. 
Patrick S. Gilmore led the 22nd. He was 
never with the 7th Regiment Band. 

W. E.— Hi Henry is still alive. Write 
to Brentano's, Union Square, N. Y., for 
copies of the books you wish to purchase. 
If published they can get them for you. 

E. D.— Sidney Drew and his wife were 

starred in that picture. Yes, they were 

- also the featured performers in "Harold, 

the Last, of the Saxons," another .comedy 

picture. ,_ s ,., ... -,-..:': 

C. A. — Nola .Mercer i>u > comedienne 
with, the Winn if red St. Claire Company. 
I She fractured her arm that iweek but ap- 
peared during the next with the broken 
limb; in a sling. .-,•• • J 

", - 

W. G. — Leon Errol never appeared in 
any of the Winter Garden productions or 
under the Shubert management. When 
he left the "Follies" he went with Ray- 
mond Hitchcock. 



D. F. — Yes, Emma Carve ones played an 
engagement at the Palace. That was in 
June, 1915. She was taken 01 during her 

Spment and Nora Bayes and Loo 
o replaced her. . . 



engages 
Cajrillo : 



J. W. — Jane Ware was the featured per- 
former in the "Texas" attraction on the 
International Circuit several years ago. 
She appeared in vaudeville in 1917 in aa 
act called "A Texas Tangle. 1 * 

T. B. — James E. Rome, then of the Bam 
Sidman show, was divorced from Mar- 
guerite Ferguson in February, 1917. They 
played together aa the team of Rome and 
Ferguson and were well known. 

P. H. — To the beat of our kno wledg e, 
•M. M. Theiae, who produced "Wine, 
Women and Song," is still alive. No, we 
don't know where he is. Bonita, who 
starred in the show, it now ap pe arin g in 
vaudeville with Law 



Rkko Rattles 



WAIT AND SEE 

We suspect if this rumored actors' 
strike continues, that A. A. E. A. wUl 
stand for Actor* Art EatUtt Artists. 



NEVER atsa iW ) OF HIM 

Ely Sobel, when aeked if he had ever 
seen Harry Delf, remarked that ha had 
never even heard of him, but was inti- 
mately acquainted with Philly Delf. 

OVERHEARD 
1st Ham.— Hello Sam, what are yon 

d ciing now? 2nd Ham. — I'm in vaudeville. 
1st Ham.— What's your ectt" 2nd Ham. 
— Petrick Murphys the Irish minstrel. 

HE KNOWS WHY 

Bob Baker says he knows why the 
Bernstein Brothers are known aa the 
"scratch" duo, for he says he knew them 
when they were selling matches in Osh- 
kosh. ^^ . 

THINGS WORTH HAVING 

Gertrude VanderbilVs Ankles. 
Bee Palmer's wiggle. ■ ■ 
Abe Feinberg's exposed sklight 
Allan Spencer Tenneys wit. 
Leo Newman's private stock. 

NOTED LAMBS 

William Collier — on Broadway. 
Louis Mann — ditto. '••'■f' 

Sam Bernard— ditto. 
Jack Dempaey*s wallop— on the chin. 
Two-cent Transfers — on the pocket- 
book. 



TRUE TO FORK 

Gladys Brockwell can now claim first 
chance for the leading role in "Three 
Days," for she recently married, and three 
daya after, found she had to divorce her 
husband before she could be his wife. 
"Whose looney nowt" 



NOTES OF THE OFF SEASON 
Harvey Green buys a pair of suspenders. 
Al Leichter blows himself to a pickle. 
• Joe Michaels bets on the Athletics. 
, Bob Baker finds an old collar button. 

Mark Under takes his girl to the 
automat. 



PAPERLY SPEAKING 

An actor once saw a "Star" whose pic- 
ture was on a "Billboard," and he said 
I'll "Telegraph" her that I love her m 
"Clipper" a 'Variety" of flowers and send 
them, and when she sees them in tha 
"Mirror" she'll know she's got the "Spot- 
light" of my heart. Si— This is only a 
"Revue" of papers. -,,.>.. , •„>.? 

HEARD BACK STAGE -■'.*; 

"Well, one good thing about my laying 
off is that I can tell my dame rm on a 
vacation." 

"No', don't ask Mas for a loan, he may 
remind himself about that other ten-spot 
he once handed us." 

"WhatTlTdonowT Those fellows used 
that gag I had all ready to pull after our 
bows." 

"See to it that we get a spot ahead of 
those guys, or we're ruined. Their act ia 
just like ours." 

"My plant's a lucky fellow— you oughta' 
see the queen he is going to alt next to 
at this show." " 

THEATRICAL FAIRY TALES, HO. 4 

Once upon a time there was a star on 
Broadway who waa very truthful. He 
was shy, bashful and afraid of the woman. 
Modesty waa the big point in hli make-up. 
He waa always ready to admit that an- 
other actor as better than he and always 
placed the proper valuation upon hla 
service*. Above all, he never oonirdered 
it beneath his dignity to grsst his friends 
and acquaintances on the street. He waa 
liked by sB— was always ready to help 
out Us actor friends with loans, and so 
forth. Whan he found himself broke, they 
treated him to a t hre e ca nt frankfurter 
and expressions of their sorrow. Ma 
li ved h appily ever after, in heaven, after 
starving. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



Augusts, 1919 



'••- y* 



Tie Men Vho Make Hits For Others Can Make Ihein fer^tt 

Do Yott Kttow What Ibis 
Emblem Stands For? 

Success! f 

Z— « Vitcli For It Oh Your Professional Copies!! —^ 





■ ■ . 



':■■[. 



i 






THE 



ARTIST 



who chooses songs from the list available in the offices of 
the wise ones — the veterans — of the publishing industry— 

can't go wrong! ,.v-a 

"LOOK FOR THE EMBLEM" 



••..-:.■ 



TUF* 

ORCHESTRA 

THE 

THEATRE 



The clever director makes his selections 
from the catalog of the "Hit Makers" 
— ^^hey show the emblem. 

^LOOK FOR THE EMBLEM" 



A consistently selected repertoire of songs and' 

music does much to assure success. It takes 

experience to make hits. These men have i t . 

"LOOK FOR THE EMBLEM" 



■■mm 



DO YOU NEED A HIT ? SEE ANY OF US! 
WE'LL HELP YOU FIND IT! 



IRVING BERLIN 



BROADWAY MUSIC 

CORPORATION 



BUCKEYE MUSIC 
company; 



C C CHURCH 
MEYER COHEN 

MUSIC PUB. CO. 

DANIELS 4 WILSON 

LEO FEIST 

GILBERT & FRIEDLAND 



CHAS. K. HARRIS 



KENDIS-BROCKMAN 

MUSIC COMPANY 



McCarthy & fischer 



McKINLEY MUSIC 

: COMPANY 

JOE MORRIS MUSIC 

COMPANY 



PACE & HANDY 



ALPIANTADOSI 
JEROME H. REMICK 



MAURICE RICHMOND 



SHAPIRO, BERNSTEIN 

* COMPANY 



SHERMAN, CLAY 

* COMPANY ' 



A J. STASNY 



JOS. W. STERN 

* company •'.: 



HARRY VON TILZER 



WATERSON, BERLIN 
: A SNYDER J^ 



M. WITMARK & SONS 



. 



V^' .'". 



mm- 



.>.': 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 





"■■■ - 



UN® 



■ r '■■ 



WOOL WORTH RETAIL SYNDICATE 
AND PUBLISHERS ARE AT ODDS 

Big Increase in Number of High Priced Publication* Responsible 

for Trouble — Publishers May Prefer Charges with Federal 

Authorities if Price Cutting Is Not Stopped 



r 






■ 



■ ■ ■■:■ 



& -•: : 



The business controversy, -which has for 
several weeks been on between the F. W. 
Wool worth & Co., retail syndicate on one 
side and a number of publishers of popular 
sheet music on the other is fast reaching 
a "li"" ' •„ 

The latest development occurred last 
week when a Wool worth ezecntive an- 
nounced that Maurice Goodman, attorney 
Jot the Muaic Publishers' Protective Asso- 
ciation, had notified the retail syndicate 
that if it continued to retail high class or 
sixty cent sheet music at ten cents per copy 
the matter would be brought to the atten- 
tion of the Federal Government. 

The original difference was. caused by 
several of the publishers marking certain 
prints at the sixty cent rate, this meaning 
in trade parlance that the piece was to re- 
tail at from thirty to thirty-five cents per 
copy and wholesale at about eighteen. This 
is the customary sale rate of the songs 
which are a part of or are interpolated in 
a musical play, or are of the type which 
the publishers designate aa high class. 

Recently a number of the popular bouses 
have selected numbers which they believed 
were of a somewhat higher musical grade 
than the strictly popular compositions and 
marked them at the sixty, cent rate. Sev- 
eral. of the- numbers have been exploited 
through the customary /»hpim»la and -have 
scored big- successes. -Sold at the high rate 
the profit made from each has been about 
three times as much as on the regular Of 
ten-cent numbers and are attractive 
business propositions. 

Noting the ease with which the high 
class numbers could be disposed of to the 
general public other houses quickly 
followed suit and at present nearly every 
.popular publisher "is exploiting one or more 
of the high priced publications. Some of 
the big' syndicates retail these publications 
over their counters at from thirty to thirty 
five cents .each and the regular dealers as 
well have found them' profitable. The. 
Wool worth Co., however,, finds itself in an 
unenviable position with these- numbers 
on account of its long established retail 
price of ten cents. That is the top price 
in the Wool worth stores, no article, being 
retailed at a higher figure. It has there- 
fore- been forced < to either sell the sixty 

cent numbers at a big loss or entirely 
eliminate them from the stores. 

The latter course has been difficult due 
to the constantly increasing number of 
this type of publication and keen retail 
competition in various cities. In several 
of the cities the Woolworth Go. has, in 
competition with other stores that charged 
thirty cents for the high grade numbers, re- 
tailed them at ten, losing, thereby, from 
five to. eight cents per copy in addition to 
arousing a storm of protest from retailers 
who demanded an explanation from, pub- 
lishers as to how the Woolworth Go. was . 
able to retail a sheet of music for ten 
cents which cost eighteen. 

As the number of sixty cent publica- 
tions continued to increase the Woolworth 
Co. advanced many arguments to pub- 
lishers against the practice, asking that 
they be eliminated from the standard or 
high class catalogue and marked at ten 
cents. 

The publishers are practically unani- 
mous in stating that without the high 
priced publication popular music publishing 
is a thing of the past. The syndicate stores,' 
they say, are entirely responsible for the 
appearance of the CO cent . publication as 
they themselves have gradually forced -the 



price down to a figure which is so low that 
with the prevailing high cost of doing busi- 
ness, the profit has been entirely eliminated 
and that unless a catalogue contains a 
number of publications which can be re- 
tailed at the higher figure, the business will 
be at an end. 

Labor,- printing, paper, everything in. 
connection with' the publication of sheet 
music has increased enormously in price, 
the publishers state, yet the wholesale rate 
for popular sheet music continues around 
six and a half cents and it. is freely ad- 
mitted that there isn't a penny to be made. 
It's simply a case of working for the 
printer, they say, and with poor prospects 
of keeping up with him. 

Another argument which the music men 
advance in favor of the high priced num- 
ber is the manner in which it is being ac- 
cepted by the buying public. Whether it 
be on accopnt of the increased price of all 
' commodities or the great uplift of music 
throughout, the country, the people at large 
register no complaint at the price. These 
publications are selling in quite as large 
quantities as the ten cent numbers and 
some retailers state that there even ap- 
pears to be a preference for them. 

The Woolworth Co., with its fixed re- 
tail rate, naturally is doing everything 
possible to discourage the publication of 
the high priced numbers and are said to 
have considered, cutting off their list some 
of the publishers Who are going particu- 
larly strong after the sixty cent songs. 

The publishers, however, are positive in 
their statements that they have actually 
been forced to issue this type of publica- 
tion on account of the constantly increas- 
ing cost of production and other matters 
over, which they have no control. 

Matters at present are practically at a 
deadlock and at a special meeting of the 
Muaic Publishers' Protective Association 
which is in ' session as the Clippeb goes 
to press the matter will doubtless be taken 
up. ; 

In regard to the Federal investigation 
matter neither E. Z. Nutting of the Wool- 
worth Go., or Mr. Goodman would make a 
statement for publication. . . 



: PARIS LIKES U. S. JAZZ ;. 

Paris, France, Aug. 2.— The jazz craze, 
reported to be on the wane in England, 
is just beginning to be .popular in France. 
Several new dances -have been imported 
and the erase is spreading over. Spain and : 
the continent in general. Jazz' dancing is 
being developed . into a fine art here and 
all classes are dancing to the sound of 
syncopated ragtime. • 



VON T1LZER HAS A HIT 

In the new number, "Carolina Sunshine," 
Harry Von Tiller has a real hit. Although 
Just off the presses and at the high price, 
there have been more orders booked for it 
than any of the Von Tiber publications 
issued in the last four or five years. 



PENFOLD BACK WITH REMICK 
Tom Penfold, -who recently appeared 
with Win Morriasey's "Over Seas Revue," 
is back with the professional department 
of Jerome H. Bemick ft Co. 



MORRIS GETS A SONG 

The Joe Morris Co. has acquired the 

publication rights of a. new number called . 

"Pretty Little Rainbow." issued by the D. 

W..Cooper house ot Boston.. . v : ^.;- .:. 



BOOST IN POST AD RATES COMING 

Another boost in the advertising rates 
of The Saturltoy Evening Post is expected 
this FalL The great weekly which is being 
used to quite some extent by two or three 
music houses now charges $6,000 a page 
for its advertising space.. The decision to 
make this rate was undoubtedly sudden, as ' 
agents received the notification by tele- 
graph, and the new rate, which is said to 
be under discussion in the offices of the 
publishers,. is said to be a substantial raise 
over the prevailing figures. ■ 

MORE PUBLISHERS COMING 
No less than three new music publishing 
houses will open their doors before snow' 
files if the plans of a number of men now 
connected with various publishing houses 
do not miscarry. The big boom which the 
music business has enjoyed during the past, 
year, together with the prospects, for added 
prosperity, are responsible for the proposed 
new bouses. 

All are of the popular variety and will 
feature the lighter type of composition. 

MILLS' NEW SONG SCORES 

Jack Mills' first song publication, "I 
Don't Want a Doctor," has scored a quick 
success in the singing profession. No less 
than four acts went into a single big time 
house last week with the number in each 
repertoire. Of course, not one could sing 
it, nevertheless, it gives a good idea as to 
the extent the song has been placed. 



LEE DAVID WRITES AN ACT 

Lee David, the composer, has completed 
a new vaudeville act for Lou Lockett, which 
will be seen early in September. David 
has written all the songs, lyrics, idalogue 
and incidental music of the act 

ED WILSON WITH McKlNLEY 

Ed. Wilson, who has been on the stage 

for a number of years, is now connected 

with the McKinley Music Co., in the 

capacity of New England representative. , 

HARRIS HAS NEW BALLAD 

C h as. K. Harris has released a new ballad 
entitled 'When the Lotus Flowers Bloom in 
China Land," which is meeting with much 
success among professional singers. 

MILLS BACK FROM VACATION 

F. C. Mills, assistant secretary of the 
Music Publishers' Protective Association, 
returned this week from two weeks* vaca- 
tion spent in San Antonio, Texas. 

NEW OFFICES IN FAR WEST 

The McCarthy Sc Fisher Co. has opened 
an office in Seattle under the management 
of Larry Yoell and another in Los E jelll 
in charge of' Jack Hayden. 

FEIST BUYS WESTERN SONG 

Leo. Feist, Inc., has purchased from the 
Cooper Melody Shop of Los Angeles, CsX, 
the song "In 8iam," by John Cooper and 
A. A. Burden. 



BARNEY HAGIN IN SEATTLE 

Barney Hagin, formerly connected with 
the San Francisco office of M. Witmark ft 
Sons, is now manager of the Seattle office 
of the firm. 



COOPER SINGS HAREM SONG 

Lew Cooper, with the "Oh ! What a Girl" 
Witmark song, "Give Me the Sultan's 
show, is successfully featuring the new 
Harem." 



STERN TO OPEN THIS WEEK 

Jos. W. Stern ft Co. are planning to open 
their -new professional department in West 
46th Street this week. 



MUCK WANTS TO BEAT LAW 

Washington-, Aug. .1.— During the de- 
bate on the Johnson bill for the deportation 
of interned alien enemies, it was disclosed 
yesterday that Dr. Karl Muck, interned 
director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
is making an effort to have the United 
States Government deport him to Switzer- 
land. If Muck should be deported before 
Congress acts, he. might later return, even 
if the bill were passed. Deportation under 
the Johnson bill would make it impossible 
for him to return. ' . 



STANLEY MURPHY ON BROADWAY 

Stanley Murphy, the song writer, who 
for the past few months has been in a 
Long Island sanitarium, suffering from a 
nervous breakdown, is back on Broadway 
again. Murphy is making his home with 
his brother outside of the city, and comes 
in occasionally to call on friends and pub- 
lishers. Although not' completely well, 
his condition is improved. 

FEIST BUYS CARTON SONG 
Leo Feist, Inc., has purchased the pub- 
lication rights of the song "I'm Always 
Building Castles in the Air," a number 
from the Ted Garton Music Company cat- 
alogue. The song is. by Ted Garton and 
A. Fred Phillips, two Boston writers. 
Garton is the composer . of "Belgium 
Rose," one of the big hits of last 



MARSHALL WRITES NEW SHOW 
Henry Marshall, the composer and song 
writer, has completed the lyrics and music- 
of a new show called "Live, Laugh and 
Love," which is to be presented on Sep- 
tember I WW. B. Seeaklnd. MaaSJSaB, 
with Miss Adeline, will be seen in vaude- 
ville this season, having booked a routs 
over the Orpheum Circuit. 

HARRIS SONG SCORES QUICKLY 

The new Charles K. Harris song, "Ohi 
How She Can Dancel- it scoring one of 
the quickest hits oa ricord. Written by 
Emma Cams and J. Walter Leopold, and 
first introduced by them in their vaude- 
ville act, the song has rapidly forced itself 
to the front. 



"FIFTY-FIFTY" SETS OPENING 

"Fifty-Fifty, Ltd.," a musical version of 
"All the Comforts of Home," will be pre- 
sented for the first time in Washington on 
August 31 by the Sdbllia Company. The 
dances are being staged by Walter Brooks, 
of the Drury Lane Theatre, London. 

RICHMOND OPENS OFFICE 

Richmond, the music publisher, who 
Started "Smiles" anM"Tefi Me" on the 
road to popularity, has opened a profes- 
sional office at No. 1052 Broadway. Jack 
Bobbins, general manager of the com- 
pany, is in charge. . 

. LASKA WRITING NEW SHOW 

Owing to conflicting contracture! rela- 
tions, Edward Leaks, will not write the 
lyrics of "The Flower of Cathay,'' but wUl 
instead write the lyrics and music of 
another production for Comstock ft Gest. 

GILBERT A HEADUNER 

L. Wolfe Gilbert headlined the Amer- 
ican Theatre bill, singing a number of 
newt songs of his own composition hut 
wees. He scored the big applause hit of 
the MIL 



ZAMECNTK SIGNS WITH FOX 
J. 8. Zamfcnik has resigned a long term 
contract with the Sam Fox bouse of Cleve- 
land. . 



ARTHUR LANG WITH LEO FEIST 

Arthur Lang, the arranger and com- 
poser, is now connected with the orches- 
tra department of the Leo Fekt house. 

"PAL O' MINE" RELEASED 

G. Rieordi ft Co. have released to vaude- 
ville singers the Lieut. Oitz Bice and 
Harold Robe song, "Pal o' Mine." 

LAMBERT WITH McKlNLEY CO. 
Ernest A. Lambert has Joined the pro- 
fessional staff of the McKinley Music Co. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 



'TWILL CHARM YOUR HEART 








['A Dei 



By KENDIS, BROCKMAN and VINCENT 



(I'M LONESOME, SO 



Another "Hawaiian Butterfly," Melody 
By the Same Composer. 



A Bit of Love, a Bit off Shamrock and Ireland 
Words by DANNIE O'NEIL Music by BILLY BASKETTE 



A Sure Pop, 100-to-1 Bet! 



FRI 



Greatest Ballad Hit In Years ! 

Words By HOWARD JOHNSON and GEO. W. MEYER 
Music By JOS. H. SANTLY 

ai "•• ••• 



The lure of myster 
With live A 



XL 



Then 



y HARO 

hit they' re- 
humming and wh 



CLEANING UP— i 



f$ 



u 



A R'rot of Jazz. Better Than "Strutters Ball. 3 



BOSTON 

181 Tremont Street 

MINNEAPOLIS 
Lyric Theatre BniUWng 



SEATTLE 

301 Chickorin* Hall 

NEW ORLEANS 

115 Unrrerarj Pl*« 



ST. LOUIS 

Calumet Bmldinx 



CHICAGO 

Grand Opera House Building 

SAN FRANCISCO PHILADELPHIA 

Pastas** Theatre rVriUKng Globe Theatre Buudin* 




August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19. 



GET IT TO-DAY. 



C\ 



sV 






)NESOME FOR YOU) 



. ■ : 



^— 



YOU'LL LOVE ITS RARE MELODY 



- ". ..-;■ 



us China, men 
srlcari pep! 



■ 





HONG KONG) 



WEEKS 



ling everywhere 



) NO WONDER! 





MAMMA! 



MAMMA!! 

Co to it boys, this is a pip! 



MAMMA!!! 



I USED TO CALL 
HER BABY 

No Turkish bath required before using 

Words and Music by HOWARD JOHNSON, MURRAY ROTH and CUFF HESS 



The Warmth of the Sunshine, the 
Charm off a Smile 

BY THE CAMPFIRE 



A Wistful Melody with 

Words by MABEL E. GIRLING 



Lure That is fascinating 

Music by PERCY WENRICH 



•i^r/'r*" ' 





Words and Music by BENNY DAVIS, SID ERDMAN and ERNIE ERDMAN 



, In 



YORK 



Next To the Columbia Theatre 



CLEVELAND 
EDutona aaSafJJBj 

BUFFALO 

485 Main Street 



PITTSBURGH 

312 Camerphone Buildin*- 

DETROIT 
213 Woodward At*. 



kansas cmr " 

Gayer? Theatre Baildin» 

LOS ANGELES 

836 San Fernando Building 



/K«* 




20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 




^^^"^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^I^^WNMIWM^WWWMWWWWWWW^^ 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 




JOHN F. WALSH 

COMPLAINS OF 



COLUMBIA 



WILL ASK U. S. INQUIRY 



' PiurADELPHiA, Aug. 4. — Colonel John 
P. Walsh, owner of the Gayety Theatre, 
here, is making preparations to lodge a 
complaint with the Federal Trade Com- 
mission against the Columbia Amusement 

. Company, of New York, regarding the 

• alleged removal of the shows controlled 
by the American Burlesque Association 
from his theatre and their installation in 
tie Bijou, an opposition house, near-by. 
.In his bill of particulars Colonel Walsh 
sets forth the ' allegations that John ■ G. 
Jermon, acting for and with other officers 
of the Columbia Amusement Company, 
violated -the Sherman Anti-Trust Act 
when he demanded that Colonel Walsh 
deliver to him, without compensation, 25 
per cent of the gross profits of the Gayety 
Theatre on penalty of having the snows 
under the control of the Columbia Amuse- 
ment Company withdrawn from the 
Gayety and played as "opposition" in the 
Bijou. This subsequently was done. 

Colonel Walsh avers that the Amer- 
ican Burlesque Association is a mere 
"paper" organization, serving as a. cloak 
for the Columbia Amusement Company, 
and that the. officers of .the American 
Burlesque Association are mere dummies 
for John G. Jermon, Sam A. Scribner, J. 
Herbert Hack, Bud C. Hynicka, Gus Hill, 
William S. Campbell, .Charles Waldron 
and Joe Hurtig, who dominate the enter- 
prise, which is operated as a close' cor* 

. p oration. 

' He names certain show, owners who 
were alleged to .have been approached by 
Jermon' and other agents of ' the 
Columbia Amusement Company with 
propositions and threats, under which 
some of them were terrorized into sur- 
rendering equities in their gross profits 
to a clique within the organization of the . 
Columbia Amusement Company, which 
dealt in what tt hey called "protection." 
, Colonel-Walsh goes on to explain that 
this "protection" was, and is, vital to the 
safety of any' franchise issued to any 

. show booked . .on the circuits controlled 
by tho'-sColurabia Amusement Company, 
directly or through the American Bur- 
lesque Association, and that show owners 
lacking this "protection" have been de- 
prived of their franchises. 

He alleges that a monopoly has been 
created in restraint of trade through a 
leasehold system operated in conjunction 
with a franchise system, under which 
arrangement none but those enjoying the 
"protection" of the clique within the 
organization of the Columbia Amusement 
Company can successfully or profitably 
operate a burlesque show or a theatre 
playing burlesque attractions. 

« Colonel Walsh undertakes to show how 
performers were "censored" out of one or 

'more shows by interested persons acting 
for the' Columbia clique, and that, after 
two or three such dismissals, these iden- 
tical performers were given contracts 
with "protected" shows at greatly' .re- 
duced salaries. 

• Walsh demands an accounting for all 
of the money paid over to, and' through, 
John G. Jermon on a number of accounts 
centered in the management of the Gayety 
Theatre and the leasehold thereof, . and 

.asks for certain refunds covering money 
paid to the American Burlesque Associa- 
tion which filtered into the treasury of 

-the Columbia Amusement Company or. to 

•; members of the clique operating within 
that close corporation. 
'.!';iThe Federal Trade Commission will be 
asked to dissolve the Columbia Amuse- 



ment Company and to restore .all of the 
equities taken over by -those identified 
with the American Burlesque Association 
in return for "protection." 

George Wharton Pepper, who has been 
retained by Colonel Walsh, is rated with 

the greatest corporation lawyers in Amer- 
ica. Arthur S. Arnold has also been re- 
tained. , 

Colonel Walsh was "the money" be- 
hind the' Gayety Theatre at the incep- 
tion of the Columbia Amusement Com- 
pany and the American Burlesque Com- 
pany and, to a large extent, it waa his 
money that made the opening of the 
Gayety possible. 

The leasehold of the Gayety was for 
some years held by Mrs. John G. Jermon. 



SAYS HE JUMPED CONTRACT 

Lew Rose is going to take measures to 
restrain Mickey Mark wood from appearing 
in burlesque this season under the man- 
agement of James Blotch Cooper. Rose 
says that on July 21st, Markwood, who 
had been working for him the last two 
years, signed a contract to appear in the 
Danphine Theatre stock company at Mew 
Orleans. On Sunday, he says, Markwood 
notified him that he had signed a contract 
with Cooper and, therefore, would be unable 
to carry out bis contract with him. - The 
matter will be placed in the hands of an 
attorney this week, Rose says.' 



ROSE SYDEL BUILDING 
Rose Sydel has purchased the house and 
property at 184 State street, Brooklyn, 
which adjoins her home. It is her in- 
tention to turn both houses into a large 
apartment house, divided up into suites 
of two rooms and bath. Alterations will 
begin early in September and the place 
will be ready for occupancy about the first 
of the year. It will be -known as the 
Sydell Arms. 

MEYERS IS MADE MANAGER 

Buffalo, N. T-, Aug. 4. — Danny Meyers 
has been appointed advertising agent of 
the' New Academy, an American Burlesque 
house in this city. He has been agent of 
the Gayety, Detroit, for the past five 
years. 



ORPHEUM, PATERSON, TO OPEN 

Pateeson, N. J., Aug. 4. — The Orpheum 
of this city, will open its season on Sat- 
urday night of this week with Jack Con- 
way and the "Liberty Girls." The Lyceum 
wffl open Aug. 11, with Gus Hill's min- 
strels. 



WILL PILOT "PEEK-A-BOO" 

James Powers, former advertising agent 
of the Columbia Theatre, New York, and 
last season manager of the "Mile a Minute 
Girls," has been engaged by Jean Bedini 
to go ahead of "Peek-a-Boo" this season. 



SIGNED BY LEW ROSE 

Ben Fearoe, Jean Leonard, Mabel 
Lemoinaier and the Atles Trio were en- 
gaged last week by Lew Rose for his 
burlesque stock company at the Danphine 
Theatre, New Orleans. 



JOINS GRIFFITH OFFICE 
Fred Walters is now with d. W. Griffith 
in charge of the booking of the "Fall of 
Babylon" film. He placed Ed. Smith, last 
week, ahead of the first road company, to 
open in Johnstown,' Pa., Aug. 11. 



HAS POPULAR PRICED SHOW 

. - Billy Watson, owner of the "Parisian 
Whirl," on the Columbia Circuit, will put 
out a popular priced show in October 
which he wfil call "The Sunset Limited." 



LEVINE HAVING 
TROUBLE AT 
WRIGHTSTOWN 

GOVT WON'T LET HIM GIVE SHOWS 



WKIGHTSTOWH, N. J., Aug. 4. — Ben A. 

Levine is having considerable difficulty here 
in placing his stock company at a theatre 
which he controls inside of the Army reser- 
vation. 

Last week the members of his company 
appeared at the theatre to give a per- 
formance. However, it is stated that the 
commanding officer at Camp Dix ordered 
them to get outside the camp limits and 
directed that no performance be given in 
the house.- Levine then attempted to take 
the matter up with the camp commander, 
and the hitter informed him that he had 
instructions from Washington, and that, 
complying with them, he was unable to 
allow Levine to give any burlesque per- 
formance inside of the government reserva- 
tion. 

This ruling upset Levine' s plans, as, 
since the burning down of his theatre here, 
he had intended presenting the traveling 
attractions of the American Burlesque Cir- 
cuit in the reservation theatre, the build- 
ing of which he says he owns. This house 
seats about 1,200 and, prior to the fire, 
Levine was operating it as a motion picture 
house. 

Levine, on Monday, left for Washington, 
D. C, where he says he will obtain the 
influence of several political friends and 
United States Senators toward inducing the 
Secretary of War to let him operate the 
theatre with the burlesque shows. Should 
he fail in this endeavor, Levine saya that 
he will then request permission to have the 
theatre removed a distance of seven ty-ffve 
feet which will take it out of the reserva- 
tion as well as Army jurisdiction. 

Levine says that the reason given him 
for refusing to allow him to present the 
shows at the Army theatre was -that the 
War Department bad issued ' an order 
which would allow only vaudeville enter- 
tainment 'at the Liberty theatres and the 
other theatres in the reservation were only 
permitted to present motion pictures. He 
claims that he has been paying the Govern- 
ment a five per cent tax as well aa a can- 
teen fee, which be says -proves that the 
Government has derived fin«m4»t benefit 
from his theatre. 

If he falls in his endeavor to either be 
permitted to give the shows in the reserva- 
tion or have bis house moved ont of it, 
Levine win be forced to construct a build- 
ing to house the American Circuit shows 
this coming season. The first of these 
shows was scheduled to open at the Army 
theatre next Monday. 



WATSON TO OPEN IN ITHACA 

"Beef Trust" Billy Watson will open 
bis "Parisian 'Whirl" show for one night 
at the Lyceum,. Ithaca, N. Y., before his 
regular season, which he opens at the 
Gayety, Buffalo, August 18. 

The show will have Watson, Billy 
"Grogan" Spencer, Edgar Bixley, Pearl 
Lawler, Edith Dupree, Pearl Turner, 
Harry Howe, Phil Walsh and Rappi, the 
violinist in the cast. Watson will carry a 
chorus of twenty-two girls. 



BERT WESTON NOT HELD „ 

Bert Weston was only a witness, and 
was not held for the Grand Jury last week 
in connection with the case against the 
National Winter Garden, as was errone- 
ously stated. 



LEO STEVENS GIVES 
THEM COMIC OPERA 
AT KAHN'S UNION SQ. 

Leo Stevens gave tie Eabn audiences a 
bit of comic opera for the first part last 
week. He called it "A King for a Day." 
He then turned around and gave them 
plenty of real old style burlesque as a 
second part, called "Ward 23." Between 
these. two, be had all the members of tha 
company playing two or more characters 
throughout the performance, which kept 
them rather busy, both on and off stage, 
making the necessary changes. 

Stevens,- Mackey and Can-, handled; the 
comedy, with Francis doing straight and 
a bit of light comedy. The boya all worked 
hard. 

. Roth Rolling presented more gowns 
that were most pleasing to the eye. Her 
duet with Grace Howard went over very 
well, while her "Caroline Sunshine" took 
nicely. " *■"" ' " 

Grace Howard was given a comedy bit 
to do on her opening. It was of a Sis 
Hopkins character and she bandied it suc- 
cessfully. While not given an opportunity 
to talk, her, actions more than carried 
her througb?^ Later, when talking, she 
read her line moBt naturally. Few bob- 
brettes can read lines as well aa this young 
lady, for she knows the art of delivery. 
Her one number "Mary," waa good for 
several encores. Miss Howard made five 
changes of costumes. 

Babe Wellington "had a lot to do early 
in the show and took care of everything 
nicely. She appeared in tights for* th* 
first time in a- long-time and, we might 
say, she looked very attractive in them. 
She read her lines well and put her num- 
bers over. 

Emily Clark, as a reporter, in mala 
attire, carried herself exceptionally well. 
She worked nicely in her scenes and' bar 
number "Sarah, come over here,'' want 
over with a punch. 

The bits and scenes were taken care of 
well by the following:- The scenes in one 
with Stevens, Francis and Miss Howard. 
The "interview" bit with Stevens and 
Miss Clark. . The comedy sang put over by 
Mackey and Carr. The "MagJdan** bit 
proved a comedy situation, as it. wis 
offered by Mackey and Carr. 

The c ompar ison between an *m«*i— n 
.land an 1B "f l *«*""»"i done by Stevens and 
Francis, pleased. The "-undertaker** bit 
';by Stevens, Francis, Carr and Miss Clark 
was well done.- The "g host" bit by 
Stevens, Mackey,. Carr and Frauds 
pleased. '■■■ 

Gara Zora offered a new dance last week 
called the "Venetian Sun Dance." It was 
most gracefully executed and appreciated 
by the audience. Before she came on, 
Solly Fields, who" staged the preliminary 
dancing by the chorus, brought on the 
water girls, slaves and -the keepers, which 
gave the dancer a very pretty background, 
while working. She wore a new costume 
that was very pretty. The electrical ef- 
fects help materially in making the act a 
success. 

The chorus looked well and went 
through the many numbers with lots of 
speed. The scenery waa bright and all 
the numbers were arranged carefully. 

Sid. 



ANNA SAWYER MADE TREASURER. 

Anna Sawyer, last season with the 
"Burlesque Review" company, will not go 
on the road this season on account of ill 
health, but, instead, has been appointed 
treasurer of the People's, Philadelphia. 
Bud. Abbott, treasurer of the house but 
season, will go to the Lyceum, Washing- 
ton, in the same capacity. 



BurU*que News continued on Page 27. 



MONTREAL OPENING DELAYED 

MoirzBZax, Can, Aug. 4. — The Gayety 
Theatre, a Columbia Circuit house, will 
..sot open on the regular see son. Aug. IS, 
on account of repairs being made. 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 





Published by 

B. D. NICE & CO. 

1544 Broadway 
(NOT READY— "CONGO LOVE") 



WOND'RING 



y//////7////////////M^^^^ 



I At B. F. Keith's PALACE This Week, August 4-9 

KRBERT OJT0N 

S Introducing FOR THE FIRST TIME Bis 1919 Presentation 

A BRAND NEW SERIES OF COMEDY 
CHARACTER PORTRAYALS 



IVIAX GORDON 






......J.-. ,.,-.. >;^,--^ 



"r.r ' 



:%iv 



>MMW»»»»»MJ»Um/»»W)Wl>>»»>>>>»»>>>>»>»^^ 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



Vat Viam incorporated last week fear 



Kom Adene has joined the Gutter Stock 
Company. 

Oscar Shaw broke his wrist while play* 
ing golf last week. 

Jack Faur, formerly of the Sheedy of- 
fices, is on a -vacation. 

Cornwell and ODay are to be seen to- < 
gather again this season: 

Dwight Frye has signed with George 
Dickham for vaudeville. 



The Seymour Sisters nave lost their 
mother, Mrs. Hazy C, Dewey.. . . ,' 

BeDe Young will be the soubretto of the 
"Girls From Joy land" this season. 

"Tango Shoes" opens over the Orpheum 
time on Aug. 17 at Duluth, Minn. 

Ward and King have been booked by 
'Bob Baker to play ail of the Loew time. 

Dora Hilton bag been booked' to play 
the 'entire Loew Circuit, opening Aug. 11. 

John Cromwell is to be Grace George's 
leading man in "She Would and She Bid.** 

Dick Temple and Emily Lee have been 
added to the cast of "Look Who's Here." 



John 0. Grant win start rehearsals on 
Aug. 11 for Comstock and Geafs "Oh, My 
Dear." 



Phoebe Foster and Hasaard Short are to 
appear in the leading roles of "First Is 
Last." 



Lew Pin ens returned Monday from a 
two weeks' vacation spent at Paul 
Smith's. 



jimmy Rixzo, formerly of Bizzo and 
Buffano, is doing a new act with Earl 
Bronson. • *' • ' - " • 



Paul Kleiat and company open at the 
Edgewater Beach Hotel, Chicago, HI., on 
August 7. 

Margaret Fitigerald, reputed to be a 
Chicago society girl, has joined the Zieg- 
feld chorus. 

Ben Knell and Doris Bonita are play- 
aummer stock at Herahey Park, 




Lonergan has signed with Joe 
to direct "Boys WOl Be -Boys," 
nfcwplay.. • "^ 

' i . ^— ' ' V, 

Butterfield, a returned army 
officer, has been engaged for the east of 
"A Regular Fellow." *? 

Ann On, of "She's a Good Fellow," is 
now Mr*. Archibald McNeD, having been 
married last week. 



Ethel Albertini has been engaged by 
Harry Hastings for his Big Show this sea- 
son as prima donna. 

William and Gordon Dooley have re- 
turned to the "Midnight Whirl" afer a 
two weeks' vacation, .> ~- 



Joe Dolan, last season with the "Girls 
From Joyland," signed last week for a 
part in "Tumble Inn." 

Irene Chesleigh has been placed under 
contract to .Marty Brooks, who win fea- 
ture her in a, new girl act. ' 

Joe West has been engaged by "Sliding" 
Billy Watson to do a Western character 
with hia show this season _-£-.; •• 



"The Creole Fashion Plate" 'has been 
rebooted at the New Brighton Theatre 
for the week of August 18. 



ABOUT YOU! AND YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



Cross, Harry Kehy, Mot Hartweiand'the 
MerJa Sisters have bam engaged far the 
cast of "Just a Minute," which Jo! 
will produce. 



Florence Mills, Clarence Nordstrom and 
MWim Collins have been engaged for a 
new C B. Maddocks production. 

George Martin has replaced Harry Foy 
in the cast of "Billy Arlington's Golden 
Crooks" on the Columbia Circuit. 



W. H. Talbutt has deserted the white 
tops to.beoome manager of the New Lin- 
coln Theatre, Newport News. Va. 

. Moe Cappelle, formerly manager of the 
Memphis Five, haa joined Bay Miller's 
"Black and White Melody Boys." 

Jack Inglis last week became the father 
of a 10y a -pound baby girl, born in Wood- 
cliff, N. J. She is hia fourth chad. 

Mark Under has been signed by Max 
Spiegel for his "Kiss Me Again" company, 
to play the part of Foxy Grandpa. 

Gny Hardy is to be the representative 
of George C. Tyler in Chicago, sis well as 
manager of the Black a tone Theatre. 

Lionel Hein, play agent and vaudeville 
manager, is a candidate for the Assembly 
from the Tenth District, Manhattan. 

Charles Purcell has been signed by the 
Shuberts for the leading tenor role, in 
the new musical show, "Call a Taxi" 

Sydney and Townley have been booked 
over the Orpheum Circuit by Max -Hart, 
and start their tour early in September. 

Cora Witherspoon and Ned Burton are 
to be in the cast of "She Would and She 
Did" when it opens later in the season. 

Bert Mack, of the Dave Marion show, 
last week lost his father, J. B. Mack, a 
newspaper man who died in Philadelphia. 

M. G. Marcus, formerly assistant treas- 
urer at the Lyceum, Patersoh, N. J., has 
been promoted to be treasurer of the 
house. 



Laurence Gordon and Florence Jolice 
have signed with George M. Gatta for one 
of his new productions and are giving up 
their vaudeville sketch, "Nearly " 
Run." 



a Home 



Laura Walker is to play the leading role 
in "Those Who Walk in Darkness" in 
place of Irene Fenwick, out because of ill- 
ness. 



Frank Bryson and Helen Louise Lewis 

are to be seen in "Tiger Rose" on the 
road under the management of David 

BelaBco. ' 



Mildred Donnelly, last season ingenue 
with "Going Up," has signed with Corn- 
stock and west to play the lead in "Oht 
My Dear." 

Olive. Wright, Carmen Scales, Charles 
Han, Chan. Wythe and Gale Winden have 
been signed for "Lone Night" by Jack 
Goldberg. 

John Crone, recently returned to the 
United States, has signed with the 
Shuberts for their next Winter Garden 
. production. 

. MV F. Ketchum has been re-engaged to 
play character roles with the Chase-Lister 
Company, which will reopen at Atlantic, 
la., on Aug. 17. : 

Peter Callages and Theodore Scheaffer, 
amusement men of Salem, Ohio, have re- 
tired from the theatrical field. They 
have sold their two houses to the Stein- 
berg Brothers. " 



Burr Curuth has been signed tor "Cheek- 
era," of which a musical version will be 
produced by Sam Shannon under the title 
of They're Off." 

AL Raymond, formerly the partner of 
Eddie Miller in the Eddie Miller Duo, will 
be seen in a new act to be known as Ray- 
mond and Strain. 



Blythe Daly, daughter of Arnold Daly, 
sailed last week for London, where she is 
to originate the leading role in "Too Many 
Crooks" at the Savoy. 

Ruth Terry, of the "Lombard!, Ltd." 
company, is spending. her vacation at the 
Delaware Water Gap. She will remain 
there several weeks. 



Jack Marcus, formerly of Marcus and 
West and "Oh, You Devil," is preparing 
a new act in vaudeville to be known as 
Marcus and Booth. 



Merle Maddern has signed with Marc 
Klaw to appear in "Petroleum Prince" op- 
posite Louis Bennison. Miss Maddern is a 
cousin of Mrs. Fiske. 



Olga Cook and Vincent McDonald have 
been signed by Gus Edwards for "The 
Film Girl." This marks their initial 
Broadway appearance. 

Florence Arle replaced Florence Edney 
in the cast of "She's a Good FeUow" at 
the Globe. Miss Edney is with Wood's 
"Too Many Husbands." 



Dave Green has made a deal with Couni- 
han and Shannon by which he will help 
book their houses, but will not give up 
his independent business. 

Harry Masters and Jack Kraft have 
signed with Arthur Hammersteln to play 
the parts of Mulligan and Mulligan in 
"Some Time" next season. 



Douglas Dunibrille, Theresa Josephs, 
Jack Clark and George Phelps have been 
.signed for the Western company of "Going 
Up" by Cohan and Harris. 

Edward Emery will replace Lewis Lyt- 
ten in the cast of "The Red Dawn," which 
opens at the Thirty -ninth Street Theatre 
this- (W e dn es da y ) evening, ijg 

Jerome Bruner, . character actor, last 
week lost his father, James M. Bruner, 
who died after a prolonged illness which 
extended over a number of years. .«'- - 

1 Joe CoSman, last -season with "Hello 
Alexander," the Melntyre and Heath 
show, rejoined the company when it went 
into rehearsal again on Monday of this 
week. 



Roy B. Dodge was operated upon for 
spinal trouble at the Trinity Hospital, 
Brooklyn, last week. The operation was 
successful and Dodge Is now on the road 
to recovery. 

Maurice Campbell has returned to 
America after spending two years in the 
service. During the latter part of his 
stay in Europe he was stationed in Ger- 
many. ; ' 

Harvey F. Collins, Jr., a son of Harvey 
and Delia Collins, of the Bob Ott Musical 
Comedy Company, was bom at St. Vin- 
cent's Hospital, Worcester, Mass.,' on 
July 22. ' 



Charles "Chuck" f-«n.ii f « has signed a 
two-year contract with Cohan and Harris 
and will take to the road with The Royal 
Vagabond" when that . production starts 
its tour. v 



■ Allen Spencer Tenney is writing:* 
monologue for Alfred B. Curcib and a two- 
act for Connella and AdeHev .. ; '• • ' 



Bessie McCoy Davis, Harry K. Morton 
and Cecil Cunningham, along with other 
members' of "The Village Follies," gave an 
entertainment last week -for returned 
overseas men. .: -■' *;.'.. " 



Marvin Franklin, who composed pert el 
the music for "A Lonely Romeo," has Just 
completed a new number entitled "World's 
Peace." It is being played between acts 
at the Casino.. . 



i John Cort 



Frank Bertraud has just returned from 
a special engagement at Roricfs Glen, 
N. x., where he produced The Mikado," 
"Chimes of Normandy" and played the 
part .pf Gaspard. 

.-.**. .- . 

Art L. Besuer, just discharged from the 
army, where .he was a lieutenant, assl 
formerly pianist with the Ford Sisters, is 
collaborating with H. Lambert in the 

writing of songs. 

Frank Fay, Sam Ashe, Julia BaHsw, 
Marguerite rarreU, Rath Brothers, the 
Glorias, James Thornton and Tarsan were 
on the bOl of the Winter Garden eoneart 
last Sunday night. 

James W. Castle left Saturday to take 
charge of the Auditorium Stock at Kan- 
sas City, Mo. He will stop over in Chi- 
cago on hia way. It is planned to open 
the company on Aug. 30. 

Emmet Oalshsn formerly was of the act 
known as Midgie Miller and The C»sisjss» 
Brothers, is to sail for London shortly, 
where he will be the H^glitb representa- 
tive of Chamberlin Brown. 



Jack MendeB returned from his vans* 
tion. spent at White Lake, New York, on 
Monday. .Dave Rose, his partner, left 
upon his return for a two-weeks' auto- 
mobile jaunt in New Jersey. 

Jess Dandy, Fred Block and the Frank 

-Brothers left on Saturday for a month's 
automobile trip through the Adirondack*. 
A week of the trip will be spent at Wil- 
liam Morris' camp at Saranao Lake. 

Nora Bayes, Blanche Ring, Eddie Leon- 
ard, Mr. and Mrs. Cobtsrn, Frank Sheri- 
dan, Robert Hilliard, Barry E. Dixey, 
Walter Jones and Howard Thurston are 
to appear at the benefit for Barney Fegan. 

Sinclair Mason, manager of the Elsmere 
Theatre, a Bronx motion picture house, 
was fined $25 by Magistrate Nolan in the 
West Farms Court last week for assault- 
ing a boy who was in the lobby of the 
house. 

Dave Cattm, treasurer at the Blioa 
Theatre hut season, win be in charge of 
the box office at the Thirty-ninth Street 
Theatre when' The Red Dawn" opens 
there. This will be his third season with 
tile Shuberts. .. 



Dorothy Donnelly, who recently re- 
turned from France, where she helped to 
entertain the American soldiers, was guest 
of honor but Thursday night at a dinner 
given in her honor by the Stage Women's 
War Relief at the Cbsmoplitan Club. 

Bduardo Ferari-FonUna, the grand 
opera tenor, recently divorced from Mar- 
garet Matzenauer, was married last weak 
to Maria Esther Tssler in Newark. The 
bride is the niece if Carlo de Ces pedes, 
Cuban Minister to rte United States. 



AL Sanders, wine merchant, who, some 
time ago made a brhf ' plunge into vaude- 
ville, is, it ia reported, to be the Hebrew 
comedian with JeaL Bedini's new girl 
show, "FrivoUties of MsV scheduled to 
make ite appearance .some time in October. 

Leonard McTaughftn, who for the last 
two years has managed the Auditorium 
Theatre, Baltimore, was in New York 
during the past week booking shows for 
the next season with Jules Marry of the 

Shubert offices. Mr. McLaughlin has all 
of his attractions until early next SnrinsT 
lined up. . ^* 



< TUt it mm ■ Fare F, 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 



eJLJST RELEASED! 



Use JOHN McCORM ACK'S Wonderful Song Hit in Your Act or Show 

DEAR OLD PAL OF MINE 

Word* hi HAROLD ROBE 



Abo the New Novelty 
Fox Tret Song 



Music by Lieut GJTZ RICE 
ORCHESTRATIONS FREE— Low, Medium or High Voice 

Word* by HAROLD ROBE. 
Music by JOSEPH C SMITH. 



G. RICORDI * CO., Inc. 



9 East 43d Street, Mew Yerh 



BACK ON THE JOB FOR BUSINESS 





TO THE PROFESSION 

Arrived back in New York this week and am now organizing several new revues for New York and vicinity. 

Principals and Chorus Girls Needed at Once 

• 1664 Broadway, New York 



Phone: Circle 5982 



CALL 



'PHONE - WRITE 



CHRIS 



JOHN 



the 




MARTINS 



ACCOMPANIED BY MISS SYDNEY MATHEWS 
: I JUST RETURNED FROM FRANCE " 

this Week (aug. 4) keith's palace theatre, new York 

DIRECTION— PAT CASEY 



■ ■?-' v-.i:h 



WANTED 



tt 



Shows of QuaBi-ty 



9» 



TABLOID PEOPLE in all lines of Musical Comedy VAUDEVILLE PEOPLE that play parts 

CHORUS GIRLS that Sins and Danjee MUSICAL DIRECTOR with wife for parts or Chorus 

All shows rehearse at Springfield, Ohio, commencing August 18th and 23d. Please state age, weight and height and do not answer if inr 
cumbered with dog, or children. Fred Knight, Ed Moore, Rudy Powell, Belle Moncelle, Florence Capman and Hazel Young please write. 
Address all communications to P. O. Box 435, Springfield, Ohio. Permanent hereafter. H. D. Zarrow, Sole Owner. New York Office, 
Suite 1004 Palace Theatre Bldg., Hughes, Smith & Leason, Representatives. 



Hauritit-iii, I iff nmv, >rnsatioruil 



Waltz Sons 



HAWAIIAN MOOIN LIGHT 



Chicaiio 



MUSIC- COMPANY New York 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



STOCK NEWS 



STOCK PLAY BROKERS TO 

GO AFTER P LAY PIRATES 

Plan to Employ a Traveling Representative Who Will Go from 

Town to Town Watching Pieces Produced 

and Detecting Fraud* 



Despite concerted »fforts to put an end 
to pirating, the merry game of stealing 
plots and plays goes on. 

Legislation recently passed made it a 
penal crime to steal, procure, or by any 
means' present a play as your own which 
had been pirated from another. This had 
the desired effect of putting the pirates 
out of business as far as the larger cities 
were concerned. But they transferred 
their activities to the smaller cities and . 
towns of the middle and far west, where 
stock has been the mainstay of theat- 
ricals. There they set up as agents of 
the large play brokerage firms in New 
York and other large cities, and began 
marketing their stolen goods, Of course, 
they offered them at prices that the stock 
manager, eagerly jumped at, the result 
being that, before he was wise, he had 
on his bands a number of plays that had 
been pirated from others and he was in a 
fair way to be ruined. 

This has resulted in a decision on toe 
part of play brokering firms to put up a 



fight in the matter. Accordingly, they 
got' together to decide what course of 
action bad better be taken. DeWitt 
Kewing, of the Century Play Company, 
outlined a plan that met with hearty ap- 
proval and which will be put into oper- 
ation as soon as all details are completed. 

His plan is to employ a man whose 
acquaintance with the legitimate drama 
and stock will enable him to detect a 
pirated play as soon as he sees it per- 
formed or hears it read. He will "visit 
all the different stock companies around 
the country and, when he comes across 
a play that has been pirated, he will trace 
it to its source, and, having traced it to 
the author or salesmen, will take steps 
to have him brought to justice. He will, 
of course, be invested with the proper 
authority to do this. 

This should result in the imprisonment 
and fining of many bogus authors and 
agents and greatly remedy the play pirat- 
ing evil, that has, for many years, been 
sucking the blood of stock. 



BLANEYS REOPEN MONDAY 

The Blaney Flayers, under the direction 
of Charles E. and Harry Clay Blaney, will 
open their season at the Yorkville The- 
atre, on Eighty-sixth street and Lexing- 
ton avenue, next Monday with "A Pair 
of Sixes." 

This organization, after a season of 
thirty-four weeks, closed on July 12, and 
will open with the- same cast of popular 
players, headed by Francis McGrath and 
Forrest Orr. Hal Briggs will again be the 
stage director. 

DAMROTH GETS FOUR PLAYS 

George Damroth, manager of the "Stroll- 
ing Players," who is at present seeking a 
house in or around New York, has acquired 
four new plays from the pen. of Paul 
Preston Tempie. They are "Officer, Call a 
Cop," a farce ;-l?Sln New Virginia," a 
Southern Melodrama; "The Great Ques- 
tion," a play on spiritualism, and "The 
Duel," a modern drama. They will be 

S resented by his company and then re- 
used for stock through him. 

O'HARA ENGAGES NEW LEAD 
.Warren CHara, who has been promot- - 
ing the stock company at New Bedford, 
Conn., waa in town last week and an- 
nounced the engagement for his company 
of Mary Jackson as leading woman. He 
has also acquired the following plays from 
the Century Play Company: "Rich Man- 
Poor Man," "Johnny Get Your Gun," 
"Pollyanna" and "Happiness." 

FIFTH AVE. OPENS AUG. 11 

The Fifth Avenue Stock Company will 
open its season on August 11 ' with 
"Bought and Paid For," presented by a 
company including W. 0. McWaters, Mae 
Melvin, Edmund Abbey, Edmund Vail, 
Edith Bower and Harry LaCour. 

GOES WITH KEITH PLAYERS 

Paul Scott has signed Ernestine Morely 
with the Keith Players at Union Hill, N. 
J., as leading woman. The company will 
appear again at the Hudson Theatre. 



WILL DIRECT A1STON CO. 
J. W. Castle, who will direct the Arthur 
Aiston stock company at the Auditorium 
theatre, Kansas City, left for that place 
last Saturday evening. The theatre will 
inaugurate its season August 30th with 
the dramatic play, "Broken Threads." The 
second week, the bill will be "A Stitch In 
Time," which will be followed by "Johnny 
Get Your Gun." 



BAINBRIDGE COMPANY CLOSES 

Du LU 'i' M . Minn., Aug.- 2.— The Bain- 
bridge Light Opera Company made a fail- 
ure out of its season here and had to close. 
George Sweet, the juvenile, and Florrence 
Webber, prima donna, left the company 
and returned to New York, where they are 
to rehearse for a new musical production. 



PHALEN ENGAGES COMPANY 

E. V. Phalen, who will again have 
charge of the stock company in Halifax, 
N. 'S., Canada,* waa in town last week 
and engaged the following people for his 
company: Bernard. Delaney, leading man; 
Edas Preston, leading woman; Mary Mae 
Catterm, Estelle Riley and William Mars- 
wick. 



NEWTNG WRITES PLAY 

DeWitt Newing, of- the Century Play 
Company, has written a new play called 
"Dawn o' the Mountains." The piece will 
be given a try-out by the Poli Players at 
Wilkes-Barre, Fa., the week of Aug. 11. 
Newing left Saturday for Wilkes-Barre to 
direct the play. 

RUMSEY COMPANY TO CLOSE 

Syracuse, N. Y., Aug. 4. — The Knick- 
erbocker Stock Company, under the direc- 
tion of Howard Ramsey, will close its sea- 
son here on Saturday, August 9. This con- 
cludes the fourth annual engagement 




(fib. 'If not a Pacr Pvmdtri 



TEAR DOWN STOCK THEATRE 

Chicago, HI., Aug. 2. — The Wilson Ave- 
nue Theatre, long one of Chicago's lead- 
ing stock houses, is being torn down and 
will be replaced by a new skyswaplng com- 
mercial building. 



WORCESTER SEES NEW' PLAY 

Worcester, Mass., Aug. 4. — The Poll 
Players, appearing at the Grand, this city, 
are trying' ont a new play this' week, by 
Lee Morrison; called "Cape Cod Folk*." 



ca 



The Secret 

The secret of G. Washington's 
Coffee is simple. It is coffee mipus 
the Waste, It is just coffee — with 
the wood, and all that's — 
not coffee in the 
berry eliminated. 
Try it for iced cof- 
fee. Dissolves in 
cold water. 



Ready instantly 
when you pour on 
the water — hot or 
cold. 



Went 

toWart 

Home 

Aaaln. 



WANTED IMMEDIATELY FOR 

SIM'S MUSICAL COMEdY CO. 

Piano Leader, who can arrange. Juvenile Woman, must sing Soprano. Versa- 
tile Character Comedian. Chorus Girls, we furnish all. All week stands. Ad- 
dress EDWIN HANFORD, Room 701, Columbia Theatre Bids;., Bway and 
47th St, New York. } 



AT LIBERTY— FOR IMMEDIATE ENGAGEMENT 

ELLA KRAMER C.A.BRAISTED 

Leads. Strong eootarh to Pastor* All' Biu. Mgr. or HmJ. Stag* 

eaaentiala. twin Bit*. 

Joint ea*a«*mant only. Write or wire, tin RMga Ay.- N. 3, Pittsburgh, Pa, 



IMS* 



AX LIBERTY-STOCK OR REP. 

CHAS. NEWHART I FLORENCE CURTIS 



gem 
Mail 



ent only. Wardrobe— Ability— Specialties. Addreaa CHAS. NEWHART. Cos. Dal, 



NA/AIM 



ESTABLISHED PRODUCER of High-Class Musical Offerings will con- 
sider a partner. I have capital and reputation and need a partner and his 
services. Al reference required. "A. B. C," care of Clipper. 



WANTS IMMEDIATELY 

COMEDIANS and II\J GEIMLJE 

Address J. E. BALFOUR, care Gladys Klerk Co., Belfast, Maine. 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 






; - « ,v. 







i — 

I 

h 

■■'■ ■- •. S^^WwAWtf 

■ ■' '.■'■■■•■ : " :; 

■•.■■■■.•".. v 

:£'•' ■ :• 

• ; - 

WITH BO 






MARRY KEEL. 





HAVING DECIDED TO RETURN TO BURLESQUE IS OPEN FOR OFFERS. 
STRAIGHT MAN. Address General Delivery, Jamaica, L. I. 

J 



IS AN A-l 



B. F.KAHN'S 

UNION SQUARE THEATRE 

T BURLESQUE TALENT 



Waste 
Best 



FOR ALL 
SEASON 



MONEY NO OBJECT FQR RIGHT PEOPLE 

; , "The Best Is None Too Good" :; 

We get the money and are willing to spend it. Permanent New 
York City engagement. Road salaries for good Chorus Girls. Shi 
days a week — no Sunday shows. 



WANTED CHORUS GIRLS 

FOR JOE HURTIG'S 



MONDAY, AUG, 11th, 11 A. M, PYTHIAN HALL 
■% " 125th St. and Madison Ave. 

322.50-SALARY- $22.50 

No half aalariei. Sleepers, wardrobe, railroad {area to opening and doling points for* 
Dialled by the management. Everything free. tHLM BONUS to every girt that playi 
out her contract to doae of aeaaon. ,,•. .^. ■£■•»;•. I {'■ ' *& 

Apply MAURICE E. CAIN, HURTIC AND SEAMON, Strand Thaatra Bide;., Broadway 
and «7th St., New York City. N. Y„ Room >S». Thkd Floor. * ■*>* 



PRIMA 
DONNA 



LUCILLE ROGERS 



BON 
TONS 



»wOw O w»aoo< 



>00»»( 



FA V»ff3i {■» ^^ WA 



•W 



TEXAS 
BEAUTY 



RUTH ROLLING 



KAHN*S 

UNION 

SQUARE 



SOUBRETTE 



i»ai-ivie:*r 



rWry Hm^j "K*wpw DolU" 



ILE' 

Mr *»*■ 



Oppott* Tom xiowurd 



SHIRLEY MALLETTE 



MICKEY MARKWOOD 



AT LIBERTY FOR NEXT SEASON — 



SEE ROEHM and RICHARDS 



WITH PACEMAKERS 



MANAGEMENT-HERK, KELLY A DAMSEL 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



MORRISON BUYS BUILDING SITE 

Hairy . Morrison, manager of Harry 
Hastings' "Kewpie Dolls," purchased two 
lot's at Great Kills, Staten Island, last 
"Week. He will erect a bungalow on the 
property next Spring. 

MARKWOOD REPLACES NAWN 
Tom Nawn has closed with "Blotch" 
Cooper's Victory Belles. Micky Mark- 
Wood has replaced him. 



BURLESQUE NEWS 



ARNOLD TO HEAD HASTINGS SHOW 

George Arnold, former advertising agent 
of .Waldron's Caidno, Boston, will do the 
advance work for Hastings Big Show this 

season. •. 



REIDER TO MANAGE SHOW 

I Sam' ' Beider has been appointed man- 
ager of damage and Irons' "All Jasz Re-. 
vue," now in rehearsal in Detroit. He left 
Monday for that city. 

Beider was to have gone ahead of Jack 
Singer's "Behman Show," hot Singer gave 
him his release in order that he might ac- 
cept the Irons and damage offer. 



GOES INTO "LISTEN LESTER" 

Joe Brann, comedian with the "Sporting 
Widows" last season, will open with "Lis- 
ten Lester" next Monday, replacing Hans 

Wilson. I 



HEXTER MADE MANAGER 

Billy Hexter, manager of the "Ameri- 
cans," on the American Burkaque Circuit, 
last season, has been appointed manager 
of the Empire Theatre, Cleveland. He left 
New York last Friday to get the house 
ready for its opening on Aug. 9. The "Lid 
Lifters" will be the first show to play 
the house. 



MINSKYS OPEN AUG. 23 

Minsky Brothers have announced that, 
they will re-open the National Winter Gar- 
den Saturday night, August 23d, with a 
high class burlesque stock company. The 
entire house, both exterior and interior, 
is being re-decorated and many other Im- 
provements made. 

The company will be composed of twelve 
principals and thirty girls. Those already 
engaged are Mae Kearns, Sydel Bennett, 
Louise Pearson, Jack Shared and Harry 
Bentley. 



COOPER WILL FEATURE THEM 

Bert Lahr and Harry Coleman will be 
featured with James E. Cooper's "Rose- 
land Girls" this season. The show is now 
in rehearsal. 



TO MANAGE STONE A PILLARD 

Martin Wigert has been switched from 
the "Beauty Revue" to manage "Stone 
and Pillard and their own show" on the 
American Circuit this season. Manny 
Russak will manage the "Beauty Revue." 



MORTON AND RUSSELL RELEASED 

Arrangements have been made through 
Chamberlain Brown and Jacobs and Jer- 
mon for the release of Harry K. Morton 
and Zella Russell from their burlesque 
contract with that firm. 

Morton and Russell will work with the 
"Burlesque Review," however, for eight 
weeks, and during that time it is expected 
that they can Do replaced by another 
team. 



KAHN SETTING A BIG SHOW 

B. F. Kahn will shortly offer one of the 
strongest stock burlesque shows in the 
country. • 

Commencing the week of Aug. 18 he will 
offer twelve principals, including three 
comedians, Frank Mackey, Law Lederer 
and Ernest Mack, with James X. Francis 
doing straight; Brad Sutton, characters, 
and Billy Hoberg, bits. His two prima. 
donnas will be Lorraine and Ruth Roll- 
ing. Margie Pennetti will be the ingenue, 
and he will have three soubrettes, Graos 
Howard, Babe Wellington and Vera Hen- 
rieL 

Gara Zora, who has been at the- house 
for ten weeks, will continue offering a dif- 
ferent dance each week. Leo Stevens will 
produce the book, while Solly Fields will 
continue producing and arranging the 
numbers. He will have eighteen girls in 
the chorus. 



HELEN STONE A MOTHER 

Helen Stone, now Mrs. William Buttle*, 
last weak became the mother of a boy. 
She was in the National Winter Garden 
show last winter, where her husband was 
the electrician of the house. 



NATIONAL WINTER GARDEN 



Second Ave. at Houston St. 



DIRECTION— MINSKY BROTHERS 



WANTED FOR STOCK BURLESQUE, comedians, soubrettes, straight man and juvenile. Only the 
very best need apply. Applicants will be interviewed AUG. 12, 13, 14 & 15 — Between 1 and 3 p.m. 

WANTED— CHORUS GIRLS for stock burlesque, fifty-two weeks in New York City. The most 
attractive engagement in Greater New York. Mediums and Ponies. Only apply in person, AUG. 
12, 13, 14 and 15, between 1 and 3 p. m. Only the very best will be considered. 



>•• 



it ■'■: 



'/', 



IMIIMO 



It 



• I 



i, 




Y MITE, 





STRAIGHT 



WITH MAIDS OF AMERICA 



•JAIME MAY 



SOUBRETTE 



MAIDS OF AMERICA 



JACK SINGER AND LEW KELLY PRESENT 

ARTHUR F»UT1MA1VI 

WITH L»W KELLY SHOW 

MARGUERITE WELCH 



win 



PRIMA DONNA WITH TUB VOICE 

id Richards, Strand Theatre BUaV New York 



JEW AND DUTCH 



OPEN FOR BURLESQUE NEXT SEASON 



ERNEST MACK VERA HENNICI 



Eccentric Singing and Dancing 



Singing and Dancing 
KAHN'S UNION SQUARE SOON. 

S*. ROEHM * RICHARDS 



Inpn Essn—ass SjUPPtO BILLY WATSON SHOW aw VIS-ISM 
MANAGEMENT ROEHM astf RICHARDS 

EMILY CLARK 



With Joe 



BABE WELLINGTON 

IRRESISTIBLE BUNCH OF NERVES KAMI* UNION SQUARE 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 



L. WOLFE GILBERT 

announces the "copyright" of the Oriental 
"Chino-Japo" novelty of a decade 



U 



» 



SHANTUNG 

W01 release it to the profession 

MONDAY, AUGUST 1 1th 

Remember the date 



We want ample time to have your orchestration, 
piano copy, harmony, etc., ready for you. 

PUBLISHED BY 

GILBERT & FRIEDLAND, Inc. 

232 West 46th St., New York 

L. WOLFE GILBERT, Pre*. 

MAXWELL SILVER, Gen. Mgr. 

CHICAGO BOSTON PHILADELPHIA DETROIT SAN FRANCISCO 

Publishers, of "GRANNY," "MENDING A HEART,*' 

"I FOUND YOU," "GIMME THIS — GIMME THIS— 

GIMME THAT," "OLD JOE BLUES." 



VAUDEVILLE BELLS 



.. 



MAYBLOOM 



M 



IS 






BLOOMING 



AT 






..- ■ -'.■■' 



KEITH'S PALACE 
THEATRE 

THIS WEEK (AUG. 4) 

. i 
I 
t 

JOHN HYAMS and LEILA MclNTYRE 



B. F. KEITH VAUDE. EXCHANGE 

StW TOEK CTTT. 
Filue — Jimmy Hnasey— Nets Jo— ClCCOUnl— 

Montgomery A Allsn— Muyacos. (Three to ML) 

xUraisUe— Sylvester A Vance— Helen Trlx A 
Sister— Mosconl Bros. — Roland Travels Co. 

Royal — Clark * Bergman — Al Raymond — W. 
Swestmen. l 

BROOKLYN,. N. T. 
Orpheum— Venlta Gould. 

Boshwlcfc Craig Campbell— Bellas * Hunter — 
Anient Bros. ' _L ■ 

Henderson — Bert Fltsglbbon — O'Neill * Keller — 
Bran * Healy— Arthur HOI.' 

In Brighten— Le Gwbs— Lew Donnellr— Belle 
Baker— Marconi * Fits. 

Bockaway — Henry Lewie — Nan Halpem— Jaa. 
Yjncss. 

BAXTTMOHE. 
Maryland — Fallon A Brown — Ten Mludleton — 
Lew Hawkins — M. Maxfle ld. 

BUFFALO. 
Shea's — Dawson Slatera A Stem. . . 

BOSTON. 
Keith'*— Josephine * Heading — Florens Duo— El 
Cota — Primrose Four. 

DETROIT. 
Temple — Bra Shirley J ass Band. 
GRAND RAPIDS. 
Bamons Park — Geo. Price Co. — Ivan Bankoff 
Co.— The Geralds — Francis Renault — Seven Bracks 

— Claude Coleman. . 

MONTREAL. 
Poor Danube, — Diamond A Brennan — "Indoor 
Sports"- — Wlnaton s Se a lions. 

PHILADELPHIA . 
Keith's — Bob Ball — Doree's Celebrities — Holt A 
Boaedale— aOaa IJlllan A Twins— "Beginning of 
World" — Cabin A Bomalne — Ernest Bran* A Co.— 

Jack Kennedy A Co. 

PITTSBURGH. 
BaTis— Mnscova'e Ballet. 

PORTLAND. 
Keith's — Jaaaland Nary Octette — Bodinoff — Belle 
Staters— Morgan A Rioter— Fells A Fisher— Dickin- 
son A Deagon. 

TOBOHTO. 
Shea's— "Artistic Tioat" — Eddie Borden Co. — 
— Hinersbip A Gerard — Stella Maybew — Emerson 

A Baldwin. ■ 

WASHINGTON. 
■ Keith's — Orrille Stamm — "Oreraeaa Bene" — H. 
A G. Ellsworth — Olson A Johnson. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Xaiestie— Patrlcola— Sweeties— Sharrock— Kana- 
fawa Jape— William Bbs— Casting Campbell.. 
. State Lake — Lambert A Bell — La Bernlda A Co. 
— Marion HirrU — Claudia Coleman— Three Weston 
Sisters — Enos Fraxer. 

CALGABY. 
Orpheum — "Corrent of Fun" — Blanche A Jenny 
Crelgbton — Casting Wards— Hayden A Brcelle — 
Herman A McManoa— Lambert! — Frisco A Co. 



RsfH.F 



EVELYN 



MONSELLE&WHITESTONE 



Singing and Piano '. 



Id VsooWOJ. 



Orphenm — Morgan Dancers — Gt. Lester — Lloyd 
Well*— Harry Holman — Bmdlan A Sllbermooo — Ann 
Gray— Is Qne'Dnpree. 

LOS ANGELES. 

Orpheum — (First Half) — Sbelah Terry Co. — 
"Beckleas Ere" — Kelson A Chain— lone PastorL 
(Second Half)— Sherer A Behea—Deiro— Clifford 
A Wills— Nelson A Chain. 

SALT LAKE CTTT. 

Orpheum— Frank Dobson A 13 Sirens — Th o r ns s 
Swift A Mary KeHy— Espe A Dntton — Clifford 
Walker— Aerial Shews — Carcenltti Brothers— Bron- 
son A Baldwin. 

SAN FBAECISCO, CAL, _^ 

Orphenm — "What Girl* Can Do" — "WanovtBe" 
— Nldaon A Forest— Haig A Walflron— Frances 
Dougherty— Oliver A Ott— Mile Nadji— Chinese 
Bras* Band. '. j 

•WTKHEFEQ. - 

Orphenm— Jalioa Tannen— Will I. Wart & Girl! 
— O'Ncll A KeUar — Geo. Kelly Co.— Bryan A 
Broderiek — Royal Gaseoignes. 

PANT AGES CIRCUIT 

WJJBUPE O. CANADA. 
Bonesetti Troupe — Stan A UacLanrel — Long A 
Ward— Fritchie. - ■• . ■ 

BXGIHA A SASKATOON, CANADA. 
O. H. Teddy — Frank Bnsh — J. Swayne Gordon A 
Co.— Georgia Howard — Three Fishers. 
EDMONTON, CANADA 
Oh, Billy — Hall A Shapiro — Joe Roberts — McLean 
A Co. — Stagpole A Spier— Moxarts. 

CALGARY, CANADA. 
Honeymoon Inn — Shaw A Bernard — iMakarenka 

Duo Marry Livingston — Anstin A Delsney— Bials. 

QBEAT FAXXS AsTO HELENA MOST. 
Cyeno Japa — Clyde Cook — Venetian Gypsies — 
Silber A North— Lady Alice's Pets— La Petite Etva. 
BUT T E . MOST. (FOUR DAYS), AHACONDA AND 
kOBBOUXA (ONE BAT). ■ 
Golden Tronpe — Marie Fltigtbbon — Le Groha — 
Colsnolni A Breen — Panama Trio — Lorsch A 
RosseU. 

SPOKANE, WASH. 
JaxTlB Revue — Ad Wohiman — Porter J. White A 
Co. — Anita. ArUss — Canfleld . . A Rose — Mores' 
Slatera. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Little Lambs— Better Brothers — Bay Conlls— Im- 
perial Qnlntette — Bay A Emma Dean — Three 

Romanoff Sisters." ~ 

VANCOUVER, B. C. 
The Shattncks — Bobble Henahaw — Gllraln 
Dancers — Bialto Quartette— Joe Jackson— Gaylort 
A Herron. 

VICTORIA, B C. 
"Her Left Shoulder" — Florence Bayneld — 
Zlegter Twins A Co. — Angel A Fuller— Bell A 
Bra. 

TACOMA. WASH. 
Brosioa A Brown—Dorothy Lewis — Richard the 
Great — Hello. People, Hello — Ball A West — 
Stewart A Olive. . ' 



PORTLAND. ORE. 
Submarine F-7 — Juliet Dike — The Cromwell*— 
Argo A Virginia Slaters — Novelty Minstrels — 
Green A Pogh. 

SAB FBASCXBOO, CAX. 
Booth A Leander— Lawrence A Edward! — Bene 
de Luxe — Leroy A Dresner — Primrose Minstrels — 
Harris A Koland — Singer's Midgets. 
Off.rTT.ArrP, CAX. 
Dlaa A Monks— N.dell A Polletre— Cliff dark— 
Leila Shaw A Co.— Empire Quartette — . Joe Fenton 
A Co. 

LOS ANGELES, CAX. 
Monroe A Grant— Sam A Ada Bererly — Fonr 
Bennees — Joe Darcy— KeHy Field Playera. 
SAM DZBOO, OAX. 
Scbepps Comedy arena — Arthur Lloyd— Sama- 
roff Trio — Josephine Davis — Cook A Lorens — 
Teeter Septette. 

SALT tier cix ' g , TJTAH. 
Helen Jackley — Fay A Jack Smith — Kajlyam* — 
Hager A Goodwin — Bhoda A Cramptou— Ander- 
son's Berne. 

OGDEB, UTAH. 
WOI Morris — Victoria Fonr— Maldie DeLong — 
Sterer A Lorejoy — Harris A Mansion — "Soma 

Baby." 

DENVER, COLO. 
Hall A Gauds — Vahnont A Beynen — Backer A 
' Winifred— Arthur Bnssell A Co.— Tom Kelly- 
Camp Dix Jasz Band. 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

HEW YOBS CTTT. 
Americas (First Ball) — Francis A Wilson — 
Gladys Helton — Dwyer A May — Downing A Bnnnln 
— Jean Lefcrhton's Berne — Dorkin Girls — "OUT 
Boy"— Clark A Crawford— Judge A GaU. (Last 
Half) — Sweeney A Booney — Al Rlcardo — Musical 
Hodges— Ted . Hesiy— Flamenco Co. — Corse Payton 
A Co. — King A Harrey. 

Boulevard (First Half) — Joggling Nelson — Van 
Bergen A Josephine — Three BnseUas — Ted Healy 
— Seanlan, Deso A Scanlan. (Last Halt)— Lools* 
A Carmen — Loney Nase — "Poor Jim" — Fraxer, 
Bonce A Hardy — Fire Martins. 

National (First Half)— Goldle A Ward— Weber. 
Beck A Fraxer— Sabbott A Brooks— Wyre A Fields 
— Chaa. McGooda Co. (Last Halt)— Blims A Bert 
— Durkln Girls — Tabor A McGowan. 

Orphenm (First Half) — Karsey's Myriophone — 
McDermott A Wallace — Al Rlcardo— Stammer Glris 
A Fall Gays — Armstrong A James — Fire Martins. 
(Last Half)— Wilbur A Girlie— Helen Monti— 
Botellis — Harold Selman Co. — Hamford A Stanley 
— Cbss. McGooda Co. 

Atssss B (First Half) — Oliver— Harry Green — 
Beddlngton A Grant. (Last Half) — Maxwell Qnln- 
tette — Foley A McGowan. 

Dalaneey St. (First Half) — Dancing McDonalds 
— Harry Meehan — "Poor Jim" — Tabor A Green — 
Paul- A Pauline. (Last Half)— Joggling Nelson— 
McDermott A Wallace — Van Bergen A Josephine — 
Foor Babes — Nelson A Cronln — Karsey's Myrl- 
phone. 

Greeley Bo.. (First Half) — Loolse A Carmen— 
Loney Nase — Tabor A - McGowan — Gillen, Carlton 
Co. — Mrjmford A Stanley — Hartshlma Brothers. 
(Last Half) — Foor Cliffords — Ghana; — Shea A 
Nelson — Hyman Adler Co. — Weber. Beck A Fraser 
— Panl A Pauline. 

Lincoln Bq, (First Half) — Chong — Sweeney A 
Booney — Hyman Adler A Co. — Shea .A Nelson — 
Bluus A Bert. (Laat Half)— Belle A Gray — 
Turelli — Jean Leigh ton's Berne — Downing A 
Bunin — Scanlan. Deno A Scanlan. 

Victoria (First Half) — Ooyo A Ohyo— CounoOy 
A Francis — Hsrold Selman Co.— rFraser,.'. Bonce A 
Hardy — Bernerici Brothers. (Last Half)— Brightona 
— - Dwyer A May — Arthur SaBlran Co. — Ben. 
Francis Morphy — Summer Girls A Fall Gays. 
BBOOXLYsT, M. T.. 
Metropolitan (First Half)— Helen MorctH— Dare 
Austin A Co. — King A Harrey — Fonr Rubes (Last 
Half)— Gladys Kelton— Goldle A Ward— "Some- 
where In France" — Clark A Crawford— Seattle A 
Blone. 

DaXsJb (First Half)— Wilbur A Girlie— Al B| 

White — Arthur Solllvan A Co. — Sen. Francis 

' Morphy — Mnsical Hodges. (Last Half) — Dancing 

McDonalds — Connolly A Francis — Gillen Carleton 

Co. — Armstrong A' Jsmes — Bernerici Brothers. 

Palace (First Half) — Jack Moore Trio— Ferdi- 
nand — "Somewhere In France"— Grace Comeron. 
(Last Half) — OUrer — Reddington A Grant. 

Warwick (First Half) — Maxwell Qnlntette. (last 
Half L — Ferdinand — Cook A Vernon — Baker A 
Rogers. 

BALTLHOBE, MB. 
Le Veaox— Ford A Goodrich — Chaa. Deland Co. 
— Stanley A Marie Hughes. 

BOSTON, MASS. 
(First Half)— Brown's Dogs— Newell A Most- 
Armstrong A Smith — Conroy A O'Donnell — Brown. 
Caxdner A Barnett. (Last Half) — Loolse A 
Mitchell— June Mills Co. — Knox A Inman — Patrick 
A Otto— Fire Mnsical Misses. 

FALL BXVEB, MASS. 
"(First Halt)— Loolse A Mitchell— Jane Mills Co. 
— Knox A Inman — Patrick A Otto — Fire Musical 
Mlasea. (Last Half) — Brown's Dogs — NeweB A 
Most— Armstrong A Smith — Conroy A O'DOMeU— 
Brown. Gardner A Barnett, 

HAMILTON, naUATta,, 
Asakl a Girlie— Mason A Cole— Billy Swede 
Han A Co. — Carroll A Coffman — Minnie Burke k 
Band. 

MONTREAL, ftiw ina 
Lowe A Baker Sisters — Francis A Hackett — 
OetATie Handworth— Clarence Wlflrar — Baraban A 
Grohs. - 

(.ThU ii not a Ftct Pewdtri 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



SIW HOOHKI.T.F, IT. 7. 
(First Half) — Cook * Vernon — Biker t% Boxers 
— Latore A Foley. (La st Half)— One* Oaiilimi 

(First B-iO-rOooper & Lacsr— Millard * Dajls 
— Until A Courtney — Dare Harrla— FIJI Tronpe. 
iLast Half)— Aerial Belmont*-— Jimmy Canon 4k 
Co. — Hag- Norton Co. — Tack Teddj — "Faaaloaa 
De V<ki»," 

BPaUTGITEIJ), MASS. 

(First Half)— Aerial Belmont* — Jimmy Caaton A 
Co, — Hugh Norton A Co. — Jack Reddj — "F s a nion s 
De Tocna." (Last Half)— Cooper A Lacsr/ — 
MUlard ft Doj le — Martin Court— or — Dave Harrla — 
FIJI Tronpe. 

T0BOHT0, OAJTADA. 

Cowdoj WUllam* * Daisy— Lillian Calvert— 
Brow* * Jackson — Sarbler Thatcher Co. — Bxpo- 
•ltlon Jobllee Four — Fire Avollon*. 

FJJJBABES PAXX. JT. J. 

Hoiaen— Darn Brothers — Lillian At Twin Bro tiers 
Mile. AtoUj. 

PROCTOR'S CIRCUIT 

Weak Ana-oat 4. 
HEW YORK CITY. 

Fifth Arenas — Wheeler A Potter — Joan Clark 
Co. — Mary Max-eld Co. — Johnson Baker A Johnson 
— B. C. Faulkner— Diane ft Bnblnl — "Business 
Proposal" — John Catty — Gellerini ft Son. 

Harlem Opera House— Bert Earl ft Girls— Lewis 
ft Dody — Gellerinl ft Bon — Billy Shoceon — "On the 
Bagged Edge"— Joe Levoe — Chas. Ltspon ft Co.— 
B, Faulkner — "Every Sailor" — L. Fitzgerald Co. 

Slat Strast — Louise Carter ft Co. — Delmar ft 
Hole — Lydla Barry — Ford ft Cunningham Girls- 
Stone ft Annond— Maria ft Anna Clark — Helen 
G la son Co. — Lady Oga Tawaga — "Beginning of the 
World"— Lola Girlie ft Co. 

lZoth Street— Zelsys— Ksrsells's Birds— "Girl In 
the Frame*' — Yankee Four — Helen Miller — J as. 
Thompson Co. — Gilbert Sisters. 

Grand Opera Hoose — Jones ft Greenlee — Lady 
Alice's Pets — Ben Harney Co. — Loin Coatee Co. — 
HeynapaM Japs. 

Mth Street— Mllo—L. ft I. Telaak— Piano ft 
Fellows — Al RIcsrdo— Brown's Musical Kilties— 
Depoern Trio— Mrs. Gene Hughes— Frao- Mol- 
Isne— Johnson ft Crane — Maria — Stone ft Armond. 

2trd Street— Loring Smith— SaranoS ft Girls- 
Green ft Parker — Ben Vennto Two — Greenle A 
Drayton — Wco. Morrow — Billy Hart ft Girls. 
MOUNT VEBNON. 

Blsek ft White— "Every Sailor"— Patsy Doyle— 
M. & A. Clark — Mark Bros. — Green ft Parker— 
MsrseUe's Birds — Masters ft Kraft — Green A 

YONKEEB. 

lira. Gene Hughes Co. — Geo. Jeasel— Beck ft 
Valda — Princess Msl Tal — Martin ft Florence — 
Milo — B. ft. I. Telaak — Brsmlnos — "On the Bagged 
Edge." 

BBOOBXXH, H. Y„ 

Halsey — Homer Romalne — Toland ft Vine— 
Althoff Sister*— Ford ft Shaw— Corlnthens— Musi- 
cal -Christie* — Msrd ft Loreui — Jos Willard ft 
Co. — Kinney ft White — Charles Bartholmew. 

Prospect— Helen Miller— Dotson— Helen Gleason 
Co.— Merino ft Maley— Delano ft Pike— Fatay 
Doyle— Mary Max-eld— Lewis ft Dody— Musical 
Kilties — Hippodrome Four. 

Oraeapolnt — Bernard ft Merit — Mlinno Jsps— 
Lillian Fltrgersld Co.— 'Merino ft Malley— Bert 
Esrle Girls — Girl In the Frame — Dotson. 
ALLENTOWN, FA. 

Nestor * Vincent — Francis ft Orerholt — Memo- 
ries— Farrell Taylor Co.— Casting Nellos— Walman 
ft Berry — Harry Jolaon— Chas. Abeam Troupe. 

ALBANY, H. T. 
Three Hpy Sitters — Strand Trio — "Father's 
Dsnghter" — Wllher Swestman Co. — Canton Three — 
Bfgasssasj Entertainers — May Gardner — Hallen ft 
Go**— Black ft White Revoe — Bonus Tronpe. 
BINOHAMTON, N. T. 

Pasqoale ft Golden — Gordon A Gordon — Wslter J. 
Hayes— Three Kings. - » 

CT-TCDTNATI, OHIO. 

June : A L MelTa— McDonald ft Cleveland — 
Jerome ft Herbert — Geo. Randell Co. — Rector 
Weber ft Lang— Degno n ft C lifton. 
■ :•>' CHEBTEB, PA. 

Dancing Dorians — Miner A Cook — Beslsto — Ellis 
ft Irwin— Dores Celebrities— Nifty Trio— Monte ft 
Parte — Mlllay MeCartby Co. — Eugene Bnnnett — 
"All Aboard. '■ 

C&MDEH. N. J. 

Nifty Three— Monte ft Parte— MUlsly McCarthy 
Co. — Eugene Burnett — "All Aboard" — Dancing 
Dorians— Miller ft Cook— Beslsto— £111* ft Irwin — 
Dores Celebrities. 

DAYTON, OHIO. 

Jack Morrlay Co.— Miller ft Lyle— Musical Echo- 
Tom Moore A Glrb* — -nackett ft Delmar — Bud A 
Jess Gray— Leonard ft WlUtrd— Green. Miller ft 
Green — Nelson ft Bar ry- Boy s — LaBerncla ft Co. 

gTTTHir' PHj n. J. 

Paige ft Green — Psnl Porsace — Geo. Fisher Co. — 
Yates, ft Betd — "Bobbles" — Rekoma— Hampton ft 
Blake— Holmes A Levler — Monarch Comedy Four — 
Six Military Girls. 

BT.ssTBA, N. Y. 

Annette ft Morrelle — Bob. Randell — Wsyne, 
Marshall ft Candy— Dixon. Bowers ft Dixon— Bysn 
ft Riga* — Pasqnale ft Golden — "Stars in Toyland." 
HA2XXTOV, FA. 

Boblnette — Helen Colloe ft Co. — Bender ft 
Meehan— "New Doctor"— Neary ft Gore— Black ft 
Wnlte — Gertrude Morgan — Wm. OJts ft Co. 
HOLYOKE, MASS. 

NeUoa. The — Gonna A Albert — Roy LaPesrl Co. 
—"Girl In Milwaukee"— Laxar ft Dale— "Half Past 
Two." _____ • 

HA-UtlSBTTRO. PA. 

The Brads— Walman ft Berry— Holey ft HID— 
Aaakl Troupe — Dare Brothers — Cooper ft Bur-hart 
—Maggie LeClalr Co. — Walter* ft Walters — 
Colombia Six. 

DsDIA-APOLlS, nro. 

Four Dancing Demons — Cooney Slstere — Harry 
Oaks ft Co.— Bob Van Honen — Frear, Baggett ft 




, r /iin£ not 

I am what 
Jappear 



ITHACA. H. Y. 
Walter J. Hayes — Ryan ft Bigg* — "Stare In Toy- 
land" — Annette ft Morrell — Bob Randell — Dixon, 

Bowers ft DUoo. 

JX-UEEY CITY, N.J. 

Hampton ft Blake— "Girl In the Air" — Gilbert 

Sisters— Hart ft Circus Girls — Cost. Lipscn Co. — 

Joe LeVoe — SaraDOff ft Co.— Fred Wallace ft Co.— 

-Sue Smith. _ 



TO, sir, as soon as I can shed this royal 
" raiment and get busy* with ALBOLENE 

to remove this make-up, Til go witlt you to 

the hotel for something to eat." 

ALBOLENE 

Every man and woman on the stage knows 

that nothing equals ALBOLENE to remove 

the point and to keep the skin in good con 

dition. 

For the make-up box 1 and 2 ounce tubes. 

Also in V2 and 1 lb. cans. 

ALBO LENE is sold by druggists and 
dealers in make-up. 
Free sample on request. 

McKesson & robbins 

Incorporrttd 
Manufacturing Chemists 
Est. 1833 I 

91 Fulton Street, New York 




LAY OFFS 

art sot known I* Vassrrllls Art lib *** SH tk* 

triiat ant orlaleil UasSy aataial Km 

McNALLY'S BULLETIN NO. 4 

MICE ME DOLLAB HI COPY. 

CONTAINS THE FOLLOWING COMXDT MA- 

TEBLAL: 13 nrin-l Mono l OTnes. IS roaring 
Acts for two males, 13 ong-ial Acts for sals sad 
female. 30 ture-flre Parodies. - roof-Uftlng Trio 
Acts. 1 rattling Quartette Acts, a new Crxsedv 
Sketch, t great Tsblold Comedy sod Burlrsoos. an 
Art for two females, 12 cort_ai Minstrel Flnt- 
ParU, a great Minstrel Finale, l iuu heds sf slds- 
walk Comero-ons. 

■cDea-er, the pries of McNAL-TB BTJL-HSf 
No. 4 is only one dollar per copy; or wDl send 
you BULLETINS .Vox. 3 and 4 for $1.50. with 
money back Fan-te- 
ll.. H.NUIT'S, II Ettl 125!. It, U. I. 



WANTED 

Comedy Acrobat, one who can dance m little for 
vaudeville act now pitying good time. Addreas 
E. 8WEH80K. 463 W. 23d St, Hew York City. 



Catering to the Profession 

FERDINAND 
BLOCK 

Attorney at Law 

1112-14 Chestnut Street 
PniUdelpbJ. 

Extract* o. tk* Domestic Relations Law 
of Pennsylvania seat upon request. 



WANTED AT ONCE FOR 

RENO STOCK CO. 

General Business Woman, Character Man, 
Trap Drummer and useful people for reper- 
toire sfaow with baud. Address by mail C 
R. RENO. 14K Bro-_awmjr, New York. 



THE OFFICE OF 

COU ITS & TENNIS 

•On first threw day* of each week, 
will bo pleased to -Btervienr artist* 
for engagement* in their various 
musical productions. 

CABPABLE CHORUS GIRLS will 

bet paid high Salariaa with long, 
Itaady season assured. 

817 Long Acre Building 

42d & B'way, New York 



I__aXu_JTr__. PA. 
Gert Morgan— Klmberley ft Page— McCormlck at 
Co.— Esther Trio— Fred * Albert— Billy B-odas— 
WUcox, LeCr oLr C o. — Fr-nkle Fay * Two. 
IEW LOHBOH, OOSTf. 
Field Bister* — Keating * Walton — Saxton A 
Farrell— loot Sweet Foot— Touett* , s Honks— Fred 
■adrldgtt — Barry Tenny Oo. — Seed * Toeksr. 
-DEWi-i-C. ». 3. 
-lark Brorhers— Masters * Kraft— Moran A Mack 
—Green ft Myra— '"Man Hunt"— Wolf ft Psteraoa 
— "Girl in tne Air"— Olg* Cook Co.— Delano 4k 
Pike— Wheeler ft Potter— •■Babbles." 
PASSAIO, S. T. 
Bsrbetts — Simpson ft Moore — Harry Brooke Co. — 
rank Farron— Lorner Girl* ft Co.— e-estro— Karl ft 
Ine* — Nst Jerome ft Co. — Iotnaa ft Borton — Daly 
ft Berlew. 

r-RDl-U), MASS. 

Fred Bldrldge— Stewart ft Naff— Dorothy Rich- 
mond Co. — Barry Teooy Co.— Dancing Serena. era 

— Gordon ft Gordon — Field Bisters — Kestlng ft 
Walton — Toot Sweet Foot. 

RHMHK pa. 

Fred Carter — Allan ft Betty — BUoo Brossell — 
-Denn ft Cnnnlojchsm Twins — Jerome ft Newell — 
Weber, Beck ft Fraser— Dancing Humphreys. 
PAWXUC'__ET. K. L 

Singer ft Girls— Phil Darla— Valdsres— H1U ft 
Ackennan — -tabetle Philip-— Blchard Lae— Pollard 
— McArey ft Wilson. 

PATEaiflON. S. J. 

Valdsres — Monsrch Comedy Four — Billy GIssoD— 
Osakl & Takl — Bond Wilson Co. — Al Rlcarde — 
Andre Sisters ft Poole — Donbsr ft Tomer — Geo. 
Fisher Co. — Turner ft Grace. 

REATJISG , PA. 

Dare Brothers — Cooper ft Bnrkhart— 'Margie Le- 
Clarl Co. — Walters ft Wslters — Colombia Six— The 
Brads — Frsncls ft Orerholt — 'Memories" — Farrell 
Tay lor— Casting Nellos. 

ST-L-CUBX, S. T, 

Temple — Alma ft Merriman Girls — Helen Vincent 
—Emily Smllsy- Co.— Three Kings— Jons* ft Sylves- 
ter — Syncopated Dancers — Plqno ft Fellow- — Bob 
ft Robinson — Wsyne. Marshall ft Candy — Harmony 
Club — Green .ft Lefell— Three Bnllawa Girls. 
BCBJLHTOS, PA. 

Al stryker — Macy 4 Arch — Nat Lefflogwen Co. — 
William Ebbs— Charles Abeam Tronpe— Boblnette 

— Ward ft Wilson — Helen Collne — Bender ft 
Meehan — Aaakl Tronpe. 

S U-U-Miaj - A DT, N. T. 
Three Bnllawa Girls— Bobb ft Robinson— £srly 
Lalgbt Co.— Chas. Martin — Harmony Clot) — Alma ft 
Merriman Girls — Helen Vincent — '^Mayor ft Mani- 
cure" — Jones ft Sylvester— Syncopated Dancers. 
TOLEDO. OHIO. 
Bad ft Jen Grey — Leonard ft Willard — Green, 
Miller de Green— Nelson & Barry Boys — —aBeralda 
ft Co. — Jack Morrlssey — Miller ft Lyle — Musical 
Echo — Tom Moore ft Girls — Haekett ft Delmar. 
TREHTOH. V. 7. 
Fred ft Albert— Billy Rhodes— Wilcox, LeCrolz 
Co. — Frankle Fay ft Two — Corncob Cotups — Al 
Stryker— Althoff Sisters — Kbnberly ft Page — Barry 
McCormlek Co. — "New Doctor.'* 

TORONTO, CANADA. 
Barns Brothers— winkle ft Dean — Art Smith- 
John McGowan.Co. — Hickman Brothers — McKay 
Scotch Revue. 

TROY, V. T. 
Chinese Entertainers— Msy Gardner— Hallen ft 
Goss — Black ft Whit* Berne — Romas Tronpe — 
Three Hoy Sisters — Strand Trio — "Fshher's Daugh- 
ter" — Wilbur Sweatman Co.— Canton Three. 
WOO-rsOCXET, B. X. 

Pollard— McAvey ft Wilson — VsMares Singer ft 

Girls— Phil Davis. " 



STOCK NEWS 

(Conttaaed trwes p*gv> S) 



• TO TRY $2 PRODUCING 

Charles E. and Harry Clay Blaney will 
not confine their theatrical enterprises 
this season to stock alone, but »il] make 
a bid for Broadway favor by producirtg 
several $2 plays. They have on hand a 
play by Forest Halsey which is to be seen 
on Broadway. Also, they have -added two 
to their circuit of nine' stock houses. They 
plan to produce at least three big Broad- 
way shows. 

ALSTON SIGNS LEADING LADY 

Arthur G. Alston has signed Helen Bro- . 
si us as leading lady with his Kansas City 
stock company. He plana to produce 
plays that will give her and Dollie Gray 
equal opportunity in the leading roles, 
thus having two leading women. 

FRAYNES SIGNED BY AISTON 

Frank I. Frayne, senior and junior, 
father and son, have been signed by 
Arthur C. Alston for characters and juve- 
niles, respectively, with his new stock 
company at the Auditorium, Kansas City, 
Mo. 



ALLIE LOGSDON NOT TO QUIT 

Allie LogBdon, the -well-known stock 
agent who recently got married, has de- 
cided not to qnt booking repertoire people. 
She is to retain her office m the Pntnam 
Building and is having it renovated. ■ 

DAMROTH SEEKS THEATRES 

George Damroth, who is guiding the 
destinies of the Strolling Players, Is ne- 
gotiating for theatres in and around New 
York. 



WANTED 

For VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

SPECIALTY PEOPLE 
PRINCIPALS 

COMEDIANS JUVENILES 

PRIMA DONNA INGENUE 
SOUBRETTE . 

20 Chorus Girls 
10 Chorus Boys 

N. S. FELDMAN, Inc. 

Managers and Producers of 
VsuoVvill. Act* 

510M PUTNAM BLDG. 
NEW YORK 

Call berwoen 1 and - ft 4 : 3S to Sl» P. M. 

SICK FELDMAN. MGR. 



Special Announcement 



Moving Picture. Vaudeville. Opera Honas. Bazaars. Fairs. 

8-atlnf Kinks. Newspapers. Department Starr!, etc.. e-rrv- 
sbere. should art ihts publleltv Ad Booster. Inerpemtve. 
BU crowds w-rre It Is worted. Address rHF. C. 

■UCAIU. limit Psrt. -••art. M. 1. 

TYPEWRITERS FOR SALE 



Corona, like new, perfect, $4Mfc 

Now «, fiat*. Phone Columbus 7194 at 6 P. M., 

or write W. BURKHARDT. car* CUpsssr. 



112. «S 
20.90 



10Hsl« Heralds, 4 pp., each pan TilOVi 13.75 
10H*t4 Berslda, 4 pp., esch pass TxlOH 82.00 
12xlg Heralds. * pp.. each pass hi] UUO 



.114. 



HERALDS 

5.000 9x12 Heralds. 4 pp., each pass flsfl. 
10,000 8x12 Hrrslds, 4 pp.. each pap ex*. . . 
6,000 

10.000 

5.000 12xlg Heralds. 4 pp.. _ 

10,000 12x18 Heralds. 4 pp., each pats till.... 27.S0 

5,000 14a21 HerslC., 4 pp., each paft 10Hzl4, 19.2 

10,000 14t2l Bcralds, 4 pp., each w lOVji 

5.000 1x24 Bsrslds, ten sides 

10.000 Sl24 Hsrslds. two sides 

B-,000 Ta21 Heralds, two sides 

10,000 7.21 Heral-i, two ddSJ 

5.000 0x24 Heralds, two rides. . ; 

10.000 0i24 Heralds, two sides 

6.000 IOHj.28 Hersldi. two tldet 

10,000 IOtiX-S Hersldi, two ride* 

The shove prices for H srsld s eonteaplata ssttlac 
fonoi to your order from your own ropy tod cvta, I 
■trine voo a Herald that "Its" roar sursctlon. tt a 
price -son would have to ps/ tor's "MOC-** BrralO. t*st 
SIS printed la hladr Ink on sasorted patter paper or wtdl* 
print. OrJOn label on all prtnt-n. Ten*: Cas b «Hk 
ordrr. Prices subject to chants without notice. OAlFm 
SStW MIST1SB C0»fA*T (Bras* 0. T. St A.), 
U. ». A. 



ROGERS-ISMS 
THE COWBOY PHILOSOPHER 
on THE PEACE CONFERENCE 

a WW Roisr* 
swar f-wsaa p ss i s wrrtaoa 
tkls hook-" S*e. 

HARPER & BROTHERS 



BERT LEVEY 
CIRCUIT 

VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 

Alcss-r Theatre EVuildb-f, 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SCENERY 

OP A1X. K1ND3-FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

American Veil vet Scenic S tutdio 

4*J C_Wt T Tbotsw B 1- «. New/ Yasrk 

Phonc: Bryant 849J 

E. A. PRICE. 



JAMES MADISON'S ADDRESS 

from Jane 90 to Ant. 28 will be Flstlroo BaD-tOff, 
544 Market St., San Francisco, Address Mm tb 
tor seta to be written dorlsc the Boram-r. 

My N. T. Office open as nnul 



ACTS 



rt-AYS, SXETCHES WlUTT_-« 

CALL or Prices for a Stamp 

E. L. GAMBLE, n«rsrr1»it 

11 a- n t Erie B ld c _ 43s-rsla>d, O. 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 



ADONIS & CO. (?) 

A NE\? ARTISTIC NOVELTY 

:i>lR£CTIOtt-ARTHUll KLEIN 



± 



r A REAL DOUGHBOY 

IM K N/ 



Dir. 



My Pal ftti Rs«adss 



EMMA KRAUSE 



S HONEY GIRLS 

1 DIRECTION JACK FLYNN 



& SCHRAM 

PUTTING 'EM OVER 



HARRY GOULSON 

Character Songs and Stories 

Piractjaa HAT SOSEL 



JIMMY CASSON 



The AMERICAN ACE of SONG, 
with FRED KLEM at the PIANO 



SICKELMORE LE MESSURIER 

In "Studio Fancies" 

LOEWS CIRCUIT 



-J- 



3 J 




IM 



VAUDEVILLE'S PRETTIEST OFFERING IN VAUDEVILLE 



SMIL.E.TTA 

NOVELTY DE LUXE 




IN VAUDEVILLE 



MILDRED ROGERS 

The Dainty Mi** in 5 Feet of Dancing 

DIRECTION-ABE FEINBERG 



IN JAZZ LAND 



MOORE 

Direction— GEO. SOFRANSKI 



COLLINS & DUNBAR 

A Dainty Song and Dane* Offering Always Working. Western. Rep., Law Goldberg 



In th* Comedy Cleseir, 
KEITH TIME 



fled the Puluiw 

directi on—jack lewu 



DOOLEY - NAIMOLI - McGEE 

COMEDY, HARMONY, SINGING, TALKING 



GERALD 



McCORMACK & SHANNON ~ 





DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

Routes Moat Reach This Office Not Later 

TUb Saturday 

"At 9,45". — Playhouse New York, lndef. 

"Angel Face"— -Colonial, Chicago, lndef, 

"Better 'Ole" — Mr. and Mrs Cobum — Booth, 
N. Y. City, lndef. 

"Boys Will be Boya" — Ford's Baltimore, M<L, 
Aug. 18-26. 

"Cappy Rlchs" — Cort, Chicago. DX, lndef. 

"Chu Chin Chow"— Century, New York, Ang. 
7, lndef. 

■The Challenge" — Selwyn, N«w York City, 
lndef. 

"Crimson Alibi"— Broadhurst, New York, ln- 
def. 

Carmelo'a Ted. Musical Comedy Co. — Rex, 
Omaha, Neb., lndef. 

"East la West" — Aator, New York City, ln- 
def. 

"Every Woman" — Shubert-Gsrrick, Washing- 
ton, D. C, Aug. 17-22. 

"Five Million, The"— Lyric, New York City, 
lndef. 

Greenwich. Village Follies — Greenwich vil- 
lage. NT T„ lndef. ' 

"Gaieties of 1919" — 44th Street, New York 
City. • 

"Honeymoon Town" — La Sane, Chicago, ln- 
def. 

"Havana" — Plymouth, Boston, lndef. . 

"I Love Yon" — Cort, Chicago, HL, lndef. 

"I'll Say She Does" — Shubert-Qarrick, Wash- 
ington, D. C, Ang. 11-16. 

"John Ferguson" — Pulton, New York City, 
lndef. 

"Ughtnln' " — Gayety, New York City, lndef. 

"Listen Lester"— Knickerbocker, New York 
City, lndef. 

"La La, Lucille"— Henry Miller's, New York 
City, lndef. 

"Lonely Romeo" — Shnbert, New York, .lndef. 

"Midnight Whirl"— Century, New York City, 
lndef. 

"Monte Cristo, Jr." — Winter Garden, New 
York City, lndef. 

"Nighty, Night"— Princess, New York City, 
Aog. 7. lndef. 

"Oh, What a Girl" — Shnbert, New York, lndef. 

"Ob. My Dear!" Wllbnr. Boston, lndef. 

"Only Girl. The"— Cbubert-Garrick, Ang. 4-8. 

"Prince There Was, A" — Grand O. H, Chi- 
cago, lndef. '. 

"Passing Show of 1918" — Palace, Chicago, 
lndef. 

"Bed Dawn, The"— 38th Street, New York, 
lndef. 

"Royal Vagabond, The" — Cohan as Harris, 
New York City, lndef. 

"Hegnlar Feller, A" — National, Washington, 
D. C Ang. 4-9: 

"Scandal"— Garrick. Chicago, lndef. 

"She's a Good Fellow*! — Globe. New York 
City, lndef. 

"Sleepless Night, A," Stndebaker, Chicago, 
lndef. • - -- - 

"Sunshine" — Princess, Chicago. 4-18. 

"Scandals of 1919"— Liberty, New York City, 
indef.' 

Spanish Opera Co.^Oort, New York City, in- 
def. .... v . . 

"See-Saw" — Tremont. Boston, Mass., lndef. 

"Thirty-nine East" — Marine Elliott, New York 
City, lndef. i 

"Three ■ Wise Fools" — Criterion, ' New York 
City, lndef. - 

"Dd In Mabel's Room"— Wood's, Chicago, 
9L lndef. 

"Voice in the Dark, A"— Republic, New York, 
indef. 

"Zlegfeld FoUleaa" — New Amsterdam, indef. 

. STOCKS 

Albee.'StockUProvidence, E.L lnfteti '. X.".T 

Arlington Theatre Co. — Boston, Mass., lndef. 

Alcasar Players — Alcazar,- San Francisco, CaL 

Baker Players — Portland,. Ore.. IndeL:- 

Blaney Stock— Yorkrille, New York City, 

Belgrade. So die — -New Bedford, Mass., lndef. 

Bessey, Jack, Stock — Peoria. IU., indef. 

Brtstac, Virginia,. Stock — Strand, San dlego, 
CaL, lndef. 

Brown. George.. Stock — Whalen Park, Fltch- 
bnrg, Mass., InueY.' 

Booth. Nellie. Players-r-Pittsbnrgh. Pa,, ln- 
def. • * "' 

Brownell-Stock — Dayton, O., lndef. 

Byers, Fred. Stock — Waverly, N. Y, indef. 

Chicago, Stock — Aitoona, Pa., indef. 

Crawford E3 Stock, Bath, Me., lndef. 

Colonial Stock — Pittsneld, Mass., lndef. 

Colonial Stock — Cleveland, O., lndef. 

Dominion Players — Winnipeg. Manitoba, Can., 
indef. 

Durkin Stock — Skowhegan. Me^ lndef. 

Desmond, Mae, Players — Scranton, Pa., lndef. 

Del Lawrence Co. — Majestic, San Francisco, 
CaL, lndef. 

Enterprise 8tock Co. — Green Bay, Wis., ln- 
def. - - . . -._ 

Forest Park Musical Stock — St. Louis, Mo. 

Grand Tbeatte Stock Co. — Tulsa, Okie, indef- 

Gardner Bros. Stock -Go. — Palace, Oklahoma 
City Oklahoma, lndef.' 

G laser, Vaoghan, Musical Stock— Cleveland, 

0. lndef. * -. 
Hunt's Musical Stock— Boston, Mass- lndef. 
Howard-Lorn Stock ^—_ National Engiewood, 

m. IndeL. . 
Hawkins- Webb Co. — Regent, 'Muskegon, Mich- 

lndef. • •"" ■'-''■ ' ■ - f 




Hawkins- Webb Co. (2) — Powers, Grand 
Rapids, Mich., indef. 

Keith 8toek — Columbns, O., lndef. 

Keith Players — Union Hill. N. J. 

Knickerbocker Players — Syracuse. N. Y„ ln- 
def. 

Liscomb Players — Majestic, San Francisco, 
CaL. lndef. 

Liberty Players— Strand, San Diego, CaL ln- 
def. 

Liberty Players — Nornmbega Park, Mass., ln- 
def. 

Lyceum Theatre Stock — Duiuth, Minn., indef. 

Lyric Ptock — Lincoln, Neb., indef. 

Lyhic Theatre Players — Hamilton, Can. 

Mar-Lea n. Pauline. Stock — Celeron Park, 
N. Y. 

Majestic Theatre Stock — Los Angeles, CaL, 
lndef. 

Manhattan Players — Rochester, N. Y., lndef. 

m.— h.n stock — Washington, D. C. lndef. 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, CaL, lndef. 

Mlnturn Stock — Milwaukee, wis., lndef. 

Orpbenm Players— Montreal, Can,, indef. 

Otis Olive Players — La Fayette, Ind., indef. 

Permanent Players — Orpheum, Moose Jaw, 
fsask,_Can., indef. 
iney 
del 

Park Theatre Stock— TJOca, N. Y., indef. 

roll Players — Springfield, Mass.. indef. 
Players— Wai 



. Poll Playe 



Faterbury, Mass., lndef. 



'(T*ir it net a Face FrssaW) 



Poll Players — Wilkesbarre, Pa, lndef. 

Poll Players — Worcester, Mass., indef. 

Robins Players — Toronto, Can., Indef. 

Royal Stock Co.— Vanconver, B. C, IndeL 

Shipman Co, Bert. — Hot Springs, Ark, ln- 
def. 

Savoy Players — Hamilton, Can, lndef. 

Spooner, Cecil — Miner's Bronx. N. Y. City, 
lndef. - ' 

Stevenson Moalca! Stork — Hartford, Conn, 
lndef. •'■■• 

Taylor Musical Stock — Penacook, N. H, ln- 

cmcus ROUTES 

Rlngling Bros. & Barnum & Bailey's Circus, 
Chicago, DL, 9-17. ; 

MINSTRELS 

Al. G. Fields' — Aubnrn, N. Y, 6; Oswego. 
N. Y, 7 ; Utiea, N. Y., 8-9 : Syracuse. 10-18 
Rochester, 14-16; 

"A LITTLE JOURNEY" STOPS. 
"A little Journey," which ha* been 
having a lengthy and prosperous ran- at 
the Vanderbilt Theatre, closed Saturday 
night. Tire same company will go on tour 
next season, beginning late* in August. 

Alms dock and Efren. Zimbelist arc to 
give a joint recital for the benefit of the 
Palestine Restoration Fund on November 
30 at the Hippodrome. . - 



EVENING GOWNS 



_ aUahUr sen 
stack of tees* Masai settabls far state < 
A IUEI. en Wert H St. Bee Ytri. 



■ts. 



■sasa lair, ansa s*w, Mas, 



_.__— .^ _■ mats nev. Brass sts, inss, 
a^fclJpPERT. MFrT«» Cooper gte. rffiw Yerfc 

SONGWRITERS and ACTS 

Oar melodies, words and- special soagVLnar* 
anteed. Free samples on request. WOOD- 
WARD A CRAY, ttn BraaeNrar. New York. 



AX LIBERTY 

ROBUST TENOR SINGER 

would like position with qnartet or Vaudeville. 
or light part in Musical Comedy. Appearance 
and ability. On ly re liable Managers need re- 
ply. Address "TENOR," in care CUPPER. 

NEW YORK THEATRES 



B. T. RUTH'S 

PALACE 

Breedway * *Ttn St. hazabso, xb,, RXB. 

Mat. Dairy at X P. M. BZBT CXJFT0W, TEaTTXA 

BSt «0 and TBe. <j<yDXD, « n.Tnto 1CAB- 

kviij lt!(it Tin. ' 

J6, SO, TB, fL SLSO •"* ,0 • 



a> 
GUS EBWABDB, exjr- 
TOaT caAWTOSD, ataav- 
svni 



ELT1NQE 



at 8.30. Mats. Wed. A I 

JL H. WOODS : 




With HAZEL DAWS', 30SM 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



Citpnmw 




la araVt 1 to a vo H mittiW— and to ins ure th. 

In this Bat, a POSTAL CARD most be scat raqowttov as 

ba aix-aa a with your fall name ana tba aaaVaaa t» 
liaa af brain .as followed by tin 

tba data (or amber) of 



It 



•alirery of th. Utter* 
to twSrartf yaw lataa 
tfc- latter la to ba ml, aaat 

to wtlck tba lattors 



mtr, rui 

CttScrt. Paal 
Coom. 3. N. 
Cabas, Tbas. 
Oat*, wb. J. 



AUbrlcbt, Fanny 
lL 



Doaette. Jack 

rrey. s. a 

Doaonii. Frank 

. r. 

Pmirin, Veroo 



Bora, Jean 
dmlud. Hud 
Deiert, Bmto 
Delnore, late 



Carpenter, Irving 



Gordon. Sty 
Harttnt. W. 8. 
HajtVo, TbOaL 



Bails, Ida 

Ford, Anal 
Beaaid. Tana 



Comfort 4 Klif 
KeUar. Bert 
Mats. HiRJ 

Murray, Pttay H. 
MrSbaoa, Jack 



gtaf Bisters 
lunis. Ansa 
Madera, VMsa 



liattlat. Wart 
NkaU. Mr. 

Perry. Joe A 

Mb) 
Pwitou. Frank P. 



Paitaj, Mn 
Packard. Si 



to. Wetter 

Buna. tUcotl 
Taylor, nil M. 



W1M. Billy 



Dorothy 



Tbame. Ml* B. 
watts. Wlnnla 
wumd. B n wi 
Wane?. Caroline 



"OH, WHAT A GIRL" 
IS A GIRL THAT WILL 
BE LIKED FOR WEEKS 



"OH, WHAT A GIRL."— A musical 
farce .wltb.book and lyrics by Edsar 
Smith and Edward Clark. Hnale by 
Charles Jules ind Jscqoes Preiborg. 
Freeentea by J. f. and lee Sbsbcrt at 
tbe Sbubert Tbeatre, Mo o d ay eTenlng. 
Inly 28, 1919. 

THE CAST. 

Downa* Larry Franda 

Carr Mat Morphy 

Taylor George Sutter 

Smatlieri William Zlnnel 

Holmca Harold Hnlsn 

WllUama William Barry 

Boat' Dara Drayar 

Waahlnrton I/w Cmph 

Bill Corcoran Frank fay 

Jack Roenton , " a™ Aan 

Margot Merricale Banl Kirk* 

LoU Cnappelle .'......Vara Oroaat 

Lalal FraToU Ignaelo Martioettl 

Deacon Amos Tltmoaie Harry Kelly 

Perkins San Curtla 

Susie Smite Nancy Fair 

Amanda Titmouse Ellaabetb Moffat ■ 

Cinderella Clarice Snyder 

Prince Charming Ethel Mary Oakland 

Fairy Godmother Ma-Belle 

Head Walter '.. ...... -I>«ter Sebarff 



Harry Kelly is in a musical show called 
"Oh, What a Girl," which was presented 
by the Shuberts at the Shnbert Theatre 
last week. He is a very funny comedian. 
Therefore, the musical show he is now 
playing in is fanny— while he Is on stage. 
When. he is not on stags, the show is not 
so funny. Still, the show is. a much fun- 
nier om now than "when it was presented 
out of town several months ago under 1 the 
title "Oh, Uncle," it being at that time 
admittedly Jacking in the essentials that 
go to make musical shows worth patron- 
izing. ' rt WsP -.* ' ■ <;'-<• 

There is not much of a plot to speak of; 
but, a plot nevertheless. It's about Dea- 
con Amos Titmouse, of Cemetery Cor- 
ners, whose nephew, a college student, is 
bent on marrying an actress. So the dea- 
con, who is against the match, comes to 
Mew York in an effort to frustrate it. 



(Tbis I* mot m Few P am i wri 



Here he meets the girl, likes her himself, 
likes her friends, likes the wild women he 
meets, and, best of all, imbibes and likes 
the liquor that he seta while here. All of 
which is the excuse for the book and 
lyrics, written by Edgar Smith and Ed- 
ward Clark. 

The score is more than passingly tune- 
ful and reaches a very high 1 evel of 
melodiousness in the operatic travesty 
number at the end of the first act. Here 
the composers did a splendid paraphrase 
of the famous "We Wont Go Home Until 
Morning" song, which helped the piece 
considerably. "Oh, What a Girl" and 
"Dainty little Girt" are the souk num- 
bers that proved most popular. 

Frank Fay, when he worked with Eliza- 
beth Moffat, was not as effective as when 
he worked alone. This is through no fault 
of Miss Moffat's, but because of the rather 
poor material written for their joint use 
in the show. Lew Cooper, as a colored 
valet, was funny, but he should be given 
more to do. Sam Ash,, who has a very 
agreeable tenor voice,, gave a good musical 
account of himself as the nephew of the 
deacon. - Hazel Kirke as an operatic diva 
and Nancy Fair as a country girl, respect- 
ively sane and danced in a manner that 
brought them appreciative applause. 

Clarice Snyder and Ethel Mary Oakland, 
both children, as Prince Charming and 
Cinderella, came in for a great deal of 
applause with their delightful dance. 
There was a great deal of dancing 
throughout, and the shimmy was not lack- 
ing from this show. Others who were im- 
portant in contributing to the .rollicking 
nonsense of "Oh, What a Girl" are Ma- 
Belle, .Renee Adoree, Lewis Sloden and 
Veronica Marquise. . . 



TAX SWIMMING POOL ADMISSIONS 

A ten per cent tax on all admission to 
swimming pools, working just as does the 
theatre admission tax, will be imposed 
hereafter, it was last week announced by 
a Government inspector, who was visiting 
the beach resorts. . 1f . • .'.[ 



ZEIGFELD SIGNS ROCK AND WHITE 

Billy Bock and Frances White, the 
singing and dancing team that has made 
such a hit on the other side, has been re- 
engaged for the Zeigfeld Follies and 
Midnight Review. They are on their way 
home from England now. 








DRAWING POPULATION OVER 300,000 

PATERSON'S PERFECT THEATRE, PATERSok, N. J. 

Capacity 1900. Playing only Legitimate Attractions First Three days and 
Popular Price Shows the Last Three Days. For open time ap$ly to 



i 



"I CURED MYSELF OF TUBERCULOSIS 



Every sufferer from Weak Lungs — 
everyone afflicted with chronic cough 
— should read this remarkable history 
of a druggist, afflicted with Tubercu- 
losis; who experimented on himself, 
seeking a road to health. With his 
simple treatment any cough-racked, 
tortured person may find quick relief 
in a home treatment. 
Soothing-, pleasant; anyone may use it under 
plain directions. Just send name and sddresi 
on post card to ADDHJNE, 2!o> Capital 
Trust Bids'., Columbus, Ohio. 



,»» 




SO Posada 




AL STRIKER 

SENSATIONAL CONTORTIONIST Direction LOUP SPIELMAN 



J. C. TOOT & ML 



Orlcmal 
Toots and Pal in On* 



Novelty with Soma 



Dog! 



WILLIAM CONWAY 



Sw^ 



PURSELL 



THE IRISH PIANI3T-IN VAUDEVILLE 



ATLEEN 



LE ROY & HARVEY 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



LEW FREY 



FROM OVER THERE 

On too Loew TIbm Tbanba to Gee. 



LUCY MONROE &; CO. 

In "CRANBERRIES" 

DIRECTION— GLADYS F. BROWN, Palaco Tha.tr. BUf, 1W York 



PLAYS 



FOR STOCK REPERTOIRE. AMATEUR COMPANIES. 

LABGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Books lor baa 

" -^ffi^r/zrvSr - • ■■■■••■ 



FBENCH. S Wast Stb St.. New York 



Positively 

the Only 

HINDU 

Telepathy 

Act In 
America 



JOVEDDhH 

DIRECTION— MAX GORDON 



THE 
MASTER 
MYSTIC 

Always 
Working 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 6, 1919 



DulMOLRD 



In a Classic Dancing Oddity 

DIRECTION— TOM JONES 



S'Vt ISNIUIJ"* SINGER AND 

l/IIVllVI INSTRUMENTALIST 



The Only Chinese YodeUr in the World 
SPECIAL SCENERY DIRECTION TOM JONES GORGEOUS COSTUMES 



■P 

VARIETY 



erY 

tj 



DIRECTION— MARK MONROE 



THOMAS P. JACKSON & GO. 

"ONCE A THIEF" 

By LAURENCE GRATTAN IN VAUDEVILLE 



GERTRUDE MORGAN 

TT-*e Happy Little IVf Iss 

i DIRECTION— MARINELLI 



BERT 



JOSEPHINE 



WILCOX— LaCROIX & CO. 



r» 



Now Doing New Act— "COLD COFFEE 1 

By CHAS. HORWTTZ DIRECTION— LAWRENCE SCHWAB 



JACK GARDNER 

In Pictures for die Summer 



MARION and BILLY 

VAUDEVILLE'S YOUNGEST TEAM 

Singing, Dancing and Talking— In Vaudeville 



LOOK US OVER 



JOHN & NELLIE OLMS 



Tip 



Watch Wizards 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



Tho Litti, Magnet in Vaudeville 



THE ORIGINAL 



3 —WHITE KUHNS-- 3 

A Breeze From the West 

MARTIN SAMPTER, Rap. 



I 



— e 



DIRECnON OF C. B. MADDOCK 






DEATHS 



JUST PERSONALITY 



OSCAR"HAMMERSTEIN, theatrical pro- 
ducer, grand opera Impresario, builder, in- 
ventor, editor of a tobacco trade journal, 
and genius. Is dead. He died at the Lenox 
wm Hospital last Friday night as the re- 
sult of diabetes and a complication of dis- 
eases. Six days before his death he had 
been removed to the hospital from his 
home, 949 West End Avenue, and, on Tues- 
day of last week, lapsed into a coma from 
which he never recovered. He was seventy- 
two years old. , 

Besides his widow, who was his second 
wife, Mr. Hammersteln Is survived by hie 
son, Arthur, and two daughters, Mrs. 
Stella, Hammersteln Keating; and Mrs. Rosa 
Hammersteln Tostivan. The body was re- 
moved from the hospital to the Campbell 
Funeral Church, where It lay to state until 
Monday of this week. He was burled In a 
new plot purchased In Woodlawn Cemetery 
by the Hammersteln family. 

Oscar Hammersteln was one Of the moat 
many-sided, versatile and altogether unique 
personalities that ever shone in the theat- 
rical firmament In this country during the 
last thirty-five years. . He was. born In 
Berlin in 1847 and came to New Torts In 
1863, having run away from home because 
his father reprimanded him for some trifling; 
offense* 

He began his career here by working In a 
Pearl Street cigar factory as an apprentice 
for *2 a week. He Invented and patented 
many labor-saving devices for the manu- 
facture of cigars which brought him ' a 
fortune, and, up to the time of his death, 
he was engaged In Improving several other 
Inventions. He founded and. edited the 
United States Tobacco Journal, 'was a 
musician who played several different In- 
struments, and, besides writing several 
farces and one-act plays he also wrote sev- 
eral musical plays. 

After building a row of houses in Harlem, 
he being among the first builders to ven- 
ture north of 125th Street, Mr. Hammer- 
steln built the Harlem Opera House in 1880. 
Later, he built' the Columbus Theatre on 
East 125th Street, it now being known as 
Proctor's. Then he built the first Man- 
hattan Opera House, which afterwards be- 
came Koster and Blal's Music Hall; the 
Olympic and Lytic theatres which are now 
the New York and Criterion theatres; the 
Victoria, now the Rlalto Theatre; the' Re- 
public Theatre, around the corner on West 
Forty-second Street, the Harris Theatre on 
the same street, and then his famous Man- 
hattan Opera House on West Thirty-fourth 
Street, between Eighth and Ninth avenues. 

In the latter house he began his first sea- 
son of grand opera in December, 1906, and 
continued presenting It In competition with 
the Metropolitan each season i"^ 1 1910, 
when he was bought out for 11,200,000* by 
the Metropolitan company. Under the 
terms of the contract he and his son 
Arthur were forbidden to present opera of 
any kind in the Important cities of the 
United States for a period of ten years. This 
prohibitory period would have lapsed next 
January and the erstwhile impresario had 
announced that he intended to resume his 
operatic activities. He had continued to 
retain ownership of the Manhattan Opera 
House which Is under lease at present to 
Morris Gcst for that purpose. The opera 
house Hammersteln built In Philadelphia 
he turned over to the Metropolitan Opera 
Company in 1910. 

Then he built the Lexington Opera House, 
where he Intended to present grand opera 
In English, but was prevented from doing 
so by a, Supreme Court restraining order 
obtained by the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany. Subsequently, he lost the house 
through foreclosure proceedings. 

He also built an opera house in London, 
where he presented grand opera for one 
season. But the venture proved unsuc- 
cessful. , .... 

BERTHA M. WAYNE, after an Illness of 
long duration, died at the Hamden Hospital, 
Springfield, Massachusetts, last week. Mrs. 
N. J. Whittemore, her mother, survives her. 

HARRY A. LEE died last week at his 
home In the Santa- Rita Apartments, At- 
lantic City. He. was CS years of age. Born 
In San Francisco in 1861, he embarked on 
his theatrical career when young. In 
1875, he became manager for the late 'Wil- 
liam F. Cody, better known as Buffalo Bill, 
and Nat Saulsbury. . He had been booking 
agent for Klaw and Erlanger and manager 
for Joseph Jefferson and William Florence. 
He had been vice-president of the Board- 
walk Merchants Association of Atlantic 
City and the Rotary Club. He was a mem- 
ber of the Friars and Green Room Clubs of 
New York. 

fred T. HODGSON, father of Fred A. 
Hodgson, ' former manager of the Orrele 
Circus in Mexico, and of other theatrical en- 
terprises and road shows, died July IE, at 

CoUlngswood, Ont„ Canada, and was buried 



in All Saints Church Cemetery In that city, 
July 17. The deceased was the author of 
-forty- three books. He was 89 years of age. 

HARRY SHEPPELL, well known bur- 
lesquer, died at the Metropolitan: Hospital 
hurt Tuesday, July 29, at 5.30 A. M., from an 
attack of pneumonia. ■ He was sick, only 
three days. He leaves a wife and two 
children. He was buried from his home 
In Newark Friday morning. Funeral ser- 
vices were held at the Newark Lodge of 
Elks. Thursday evening. 

Sheppell was with the "World Beaters" 
on the American Burlesque Circuit last 
season and has been a featured comedian 
In burlesque for a number of years. He 
was playing vaudeville with George Clark 
at the time he was taken ID. 

RICHARD' EPSTEIN, pianist who, for 
many seasons has been a member of the 
El Strucco Trio and had been famous as a 
music teacher, died last week at the Lenox 
HU1 Hospital. New York. He was born 
In Austria fifty years ago. and had gained 

% continental reputation prior to coming 
to this country five years ago. . He was 
buried on Monday from the Campbell 
' Funeral Church. 

MRS. E. A. ERBERLE, seventy-eight 

years of age, 'who, for ' many years, had 
been the leading woman for some of Broad- 
way's biggest stars, died last week at her 
home in Chatham, N. Y. She was wen 
known/ as "Aunt March," which role she 
created in 1912 for Wm. A. Brady's pro- 
duction of "Little Women." 'Funeral serv- 
ices were held yesterday and the body 
Interred next to her husband In Red Hook, 
N. Y. She is survived by one son and one 
daughter. ■..••"-'■ 

MARY HARTLEY, forty years old, . an 
actress, was found dead in bed In a rooming 
house at 329 West 29th Street. on Monday 
afternoon, as a result of gas poisoning. 
The police, when called in, found a gas 

tube In the woman's mouth. 

The woman left a note to N. K. Lewis, of 
St. Johns, Canada, who, the police say. Is 
her husband and a theatrical manager at 
that place. The note requested him, pro- 
vided it would not take too much of her 
Insurance money, to have her body cre- 
mated. She said that taking her Ufa was 
Inevitable. The note was signed "Maude." 

The police were unable to get any fur- 
ther information at the rooming house 
outside of the fact that the dear woman 
had a daughter, Ethel Lewis: fourteen years 
old, living at 159 West 66th Street and a 
son living In Canada. The body was taken 
to the morgue. 



WnXIAMSPORT HOUSE CHANCES 

WnxiAMSPom, Pa., Aug. 2. — The Ma- 
jestic Theatre, this city, has announced a 
new policy for next season. The house 
which, up to recently, had been a vaude- 
ville house, undertook to cater to the 
dramatically inclined element of the city by 
handling the shows that had been booked 
for the Lycoming Opera House, after it 
. burned down. 

Now, Manager Bubb, of the Majestic, 
sayg that, he will remodel, his house, en- 
large it and book legitimate attractions 
there, provided the people of the city de- 
sire it Should they not support the 
change in policy, the .theatre will revert 
to -its old basis. •' '.;'.'.} ••' .'. . 



VATICAN CHOIRS GET CONTRACTS 

More than twenty-five concerts have 
been booked to date lor the forthcoming 
tour of .the Vatican ' Choirs and j singers 
from the Soman Basilicas, and in each 
case the expense of bringing the organ- 
ization haa been guaranteed by the local 
interests promoting concerts in their re- 
spective cities. The concerts will be dis- 
tributed among Baltimore, Philadelphia, 
Chicago, St. Louis, Cleveland, Columbus 
(Ohio), Dayton, Indianapolis, St. Paul, 
Minneapolis, Dea Moines, Omaha, Kansas 
City-, Seattle, Portland (Ore.), San Fran- 
cisco, Oakland, Los Angeles, . Montreal, 
Ottawa and Toronto.. 

The guarantee in each instance is that 
the choir's share shall not be leas than 
$10,000. - ' ,- 



(TAi* it not a Fact P o md tO 



CH AS. GERARD 



One Arm 

PianoNovelty 

DireefuM— ARE HIIWK 



August 6, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 




GOLDWYN ACTS 

TO HEAD OFF 

F. P.^CO. 

GETS SHUBERT PLAYS, HOUSES 



Following almost on the heels of the 
Famous Players-Laeky Corporation's 
absorption of the B. S. Moss string of 

theatres, came the announcement last 
week that the Goldwyn Company had 
negotiated an alliance with the Shuberts, 
A. H. Woods, the Selwyns and. Frank J. 
Godsol, representing theatrical interests, 
and several other individuals representing 
banking and' commercial interests. In ad- 
dition, the Goldwyn company increased its 
capitalization from $3,000,000 to $20,- 
000,000. 

Ostensibly, the alliance of the Goldwyn 
company with the theatrical interests is 
for the purpose of insuring to the film 
company the motion picture producing 
rights to the many spoken plays pro- 
duced by the theatrical group. For the 
plays produced on the speaking stage, 
even though they very often prove fail- 
ures as such, are becoming more and more 
valuable as film vehicles. However, those 
who are familiar with the situation, de- 
clare that the affiliation with the Shu- 
berts, Woods, Selwyns and Godsol puts 
the Goldwyn company in a position to 
control the vast number of theatres 
throughout the land now controlled by 
the theatrical personnel mentioned. 

"He Goldwyn company now plans to 
produce motion pictures on a scale that 
will equal, if not surpass, the plans of the 
financially formidable Famous Playera- 
Lasky Company, whose stock is selling on 
the New York Stock Exchange at file a 
share, having reached that figure from $30 
in a comparatively short space of time, 
and which is reported to have behind it 
the financial backing of the DuPont mil- 
lions. The . latter film company, besides 
acquiring control of groups of theatres in 
several parts of the globe, recently 
acquired the motion picture rights to the 
plays owned by Charles Prohman, Inc., 
which were about 2,000 in number, and 
include many of the foremost dramatic 
successes of the last twenty-five years. 

And it being a well known fact that it 
is becoming more and more difficult .for 
film companies to obtain scenarios that 
wQl lend themselves to successful film 
productions, it becomes apparent what a 
valuable asset it is for film companies to 
control the rights to plays that have 'been, 
produced in the theatre. The Shuberts, 
the Selwyns/ and especially Woods, have 
produced some of the most successful 
plays of the last ten years. 

However, the theatres controlled by the 
Shuberts, the Selwyns and Woods, and 
the fact that the Goldwyn company is 
now in a position to make use of these 
houses, during the Summer lay-off in the 
regular dramatic season, at least, for the 
exhibition of its film feature, is an ele- 
ment that carries with it obvious signifi- 
cance. Here is the Shubert array of the- 
atres, controlled or booked by Lee and 
J. J. Shubert, in Hew York City, that 
could be so used: 

Astor, Nora Bayes, Maxine Elliott's, 
Central, Bijou, Booth, Princess, Plymouth, 
Forty-eighth Street, Morosco, Selwyn, 
Hudson, Vanderbilt, Harris, Eltinge, Long- 
acre, ' Fulton, Manhattan Opera House, 
Century, Park, Belmont, Riviera, Broad- 
hurst, Winter Garden, Lyric, Forty-fourth 
Street, Republic, Thirty-nkrth. Street, 
Playhouse. ■•" . . 

Two new theatres on Forty-second 
street, to be known as Times Square and' 
Forty-Second Street. 

Brooklyn. $Wv 

Majestic Theatre, Teller's Shubert 



Bronx. 
Bronx Opera House. 

The following are out-of-town Shubert 
theatres that could be so used: 

Boston. 
Opera House, Shubert-Majestic, Shubert - 
Wilbur, Shubert-Plymouth, Park Square. 

Philadelphia. 
Shubert Chestnut Street Opera House, 
Shubert-Lyric, Shubert-AdelphL 

Washington. 
Shubert-Belasco, Shubert- Garrick, Poli'a. 

Pittsburgh. 

Alvin, Shubert-Pitt. 

Providence. 
Shubert-Majestic, Opera House. 

Cleveland. 
Colonial, New Theatre. 
Detroit. 
" Opera House on Campus, Garrick. 
St. Louis. 
Shubert- Jefferson, Shubert-Garrick. 

Chicago. 
Shubert-Garrick, Studebaker, Princess, 
La Salle, Wood's. 

New Haven — Shubert. 
Hartford — Parsons'. 

Springfield— Court Square. 

Albany — New Theatre. 

Schenectady — Van Curler Opera House. 

Syracuse— Weiting Opera House. 

Rochester— Lyceum. 

Montreal — His Majesty's Theatre. 

Toronto— Royal- Alexandra. 

Buffalo — Teck. 

Milwaukee — Davidson. 

Minneapolis— Metropolitan Opera House. 

St. Paul— Metropolitan Opera House. 

Omaha — Boyd's. 

Kansas City — Shubert. ' * 

Cincinnati — Lyric 

Indianapolis— Shubert-Murat. 

Columbus — Hart man. 

Toledo — Auditorium. 

Dayton— New Victory. 

New Orleans— New Theatre. 

San Francisco — Curran. 

Los Angeles — New Theatre. 

Salt Lake City— Salt Lake Theatre. 

Denver — Broadway Theatre. 

Portland — Heilig. 

Newark — Broad Street. 

Wilmington — Playhouse. 

Baltimore— Auditorium. 

Interest, also attaches to the personnel 
that now comprises the directorate of the 
Goldwyn company. These are Samuel 
Goldwyn, president ; chairman of the ex- 
ecutive committee, Frank J. Godsol; vice- 
presidents, Frank J. Godsol, Morits Hilder, 
Lee Shubert, Edgar Selwyn, Abraham 
Lehr; treasurer, P. W. Haberman; secre- 
tary, Gabriel L. Hess. Directors: Samuel 
Goldwyn, F. J. Godsol, Morits Hilder, Lee 
Shubert, A. H. 'Woods, Edgar Selwyn, 
Henry Ittleson, Jacob Hilder, Harmon 
August, P. W. Haberman and Gabriel L. 
Hess. 

These men represent enough capital to 
float almost any sort of motion picture or 
theatrical project. Eliminating Goldwyn, 
the Shuberts, Woods and the Selwyns, 
there is Frank J. Godsol, the Franco- 
American automobile agent, whose wealth 
is variously estimated as at least $10,000,- 
000, and who is reported to be behind the 
Shuberts in many of their theatrical en- 
terprises; he, it is said, having furnished 
the Shuberts the money with which they 
bought out the Cox interests. The two 
Hildera are reported to be of the firm of 
Samstag and Hilder Brothers, millionaire 
manufacturers and distributors of novel- 
ties. It is said that they have invested 
several millions of dollars in motion pic- 
ture and other enterprises other than their 
o wn bu siness. 

William Klein, attorney .for the Shu- 
berts, recently returned from the Coast, 
where he looked over the .Goldwyn Stu- 
dios and made other investigations relat- 
ing to the ^Goldwyn deal, which was pend- 
ing at the time. At the closing of the 
deal he also represented Frank J. GodaoL 



U. S. TO STOP 

ENDORSING 

FILMS 

PRIVILEGE HAS BEEN ABUSED 



Washington, D. C, Aug. 3.— The Pub- 
lic Health Service will not indorse any 
more film productions, as the result of the 

commercialization by several concern! of 
the Government's approval. 

Realizing the great box office value of 
"HealtV pictures, because of the great 
sex appeal possessed, concerns nave rushed 
pell-mell into the production of such pic- 
tures, taking advantage of the support of 
the Health Bureau to further their- pe- 
cuniary interests. The submitting .of pic- 
tures for approval has been done purely 
to take advantage of the indorsement. 

Another matter that had great bearing 
on the decision of the United States 
Health body was the fight over "Fit to 
Win." In New York Licence Commis- 
sioner Gilchrist withdrew the licenses of 
houses which showed the production. The 
matter came up in various courts, and 

after many legal battles, permission to 

exhibit it was finally withdrawn. The 
government body which approved the pro- 
duction was implicated and the matter 
was a source of almost endless trouble. 

Dr. Claude C. Pierce, an official of the 
Public Health Service, explained that 
withdrawal of indorsement of sex films 
does not mean that the Government does 
not. consider the motion picture a valuable 
means of spreading sex education. The' 
bureau can not, however, allow its back- 
ing to be used to further private interests. 

The ruling means that such pictures as 
"Open Your Eyes," which recently closed 
at the Central, "Fit to Win," "The End. 
of the Road" and others, will no longer 
have the support of the government to 
stand on. In the- "Fit to Win" case, the 
backing of the federal health body was 
the main factor in the defense and' the 
atone wan or* which' the exhibitors stood 
in defending themselves. 



TAKE OVER BOSTON HOUSE 

Boston, Aug. 4. — The Park Theatre 
here has been secured by the firm which 
now operates the Beacon, Modern and 
Sbawmut theatres here, with the inten- 
tion of introducing a long run policy into 
it, something new here. It is planned to 
open it under the new plan on Labor Day 
with "The Miracle Man,'' the feature, 
booked for a ran of four weeks. Exclusive 
productions will be shown for runs of 
two, three and four weeks. The house will 
be generally improved, an orchestra, of 
twenty pieceo being added. 



CHAPLIN SIGNS PRODIGY 

Los Angeles, Cal., Ang. 2. — Charlie 
Chaplin has taken under his care a child 
prodigy, in the person of Jack Coogan, 
Jr., four-yea r-old son of Jack Coogan, of 
vaudeville fame. Coogan senior is work- 
ing with Fatty Arbuckie, while his son 
wiU be working with Chaplin, for a year. 



FRANK KEENAN CANCELS DATES 

Saw Francisco. Cal., Aug.. 4. — -Frank 
Keenan, who has been conducting a cam- 
paign for the moving of motion picture 
studios to San Francisco, has cancelled all 
dates for the future, due to an attack of 
ptomaine poisoning. *--'•' 



EILEEN PERCY MARRIED 

Los Angeles, Cal., iAug. 1. — Aileen 
Percy was recently married secretly to 
Ulrich Donn Buach, grand-nephew of the 
late Adolphus Buach, ot St Louis, Mo. 
This fact was disclosed yesterday. 

The bride was a chorus girl In the 
Cocoanut Grove, New York, three years 
ago and had a minor role in "The Man 
Who Came Back," as well as playing be- 
ginner's parts in films daring the morn- 
ings, all during the same period. 



OVERHAUL MOSS HOUSES 

Five of the Moss houses in New York 
are being renovated and redecorated prior 
to their opening under Famous Players 
management. Two new ones are being 
built which will also go under the same 
direction. Those closed are The Jefferson, 
Hamilton, Regent, Flatbush and Prospect. 
The two new ones are to be at One 
Hundred and Eighty-first street and 
Broadway and One Hundred and Sixty- 
.first street and Westchester avenue. •• 



HARRY HOUDINI BACK 
Harry Houdini returned from California 
last week, after making a feature for the 
Famous Players-Lasky Company. The 
new picture is a serial thriller, the feature 
of which is the feats of - Houdini, who 

escapes, from numerous devices made to 
hold him. He started the picture shortly 
after he had finished work on "The Mas- 
ter Mystery," which was his first. 

TWO COMPANIES COMBINE 

Pioneer Pictures Corporation has com- 
bined .with "The Greater Stars Corpora- 
tion" of Chicago, by which the latter ac- 
quires the righto of -Wisconsin, Twdiati* 
and Illinois for all Pioneer Productions to 
be manufactured, acquired or released by 



F-P-L STOCK OVERSUBSCRIBED 

- The 25,000 shares of stock, preferred, 
that were offered to stockholders of The 
Famous Players- Lasky Co., have been 
oversubscribed, according to Dominick and 
Dominick, who handled the issue. 



TALL OF BABYLON" CLOSING 

D. W. Griffiths' "The Fan of Babylon'* 
is to make way' for "The Hearts of the 
World,'' into which several new scenes 
have been written and which comes into 
the George M. Cohen Theatre as' the' third 
Of the Griffith repertoire. 



F. F. L. BUYS "ROUND UP" 
Famous Players-Laskv has purchased 
"The Bound-Up" from Edward Day. It 
was originally a vaudeville sketch, but was 
elaborated into a fun-fledged drama. 

KARGER TAKES CONTROL 

Maxwell Karger has assumed complete 
control of. an departments : > «f Screen 
Classics Incorporated, and win personally 
supervise aU details of production. 

ROWLAND BUYS PLAYS 

Richard A Rowland; president of Metro, 
now in Europe, cabled last week saying 
that he had acquired several new foreign 
plays. No names were mentioned. 

SELECT GETS HERBERT BRENNON 

Herbert Brennon, the director, has been 
signed by Select- Pictures to direct one of 
their stars. He : is at present in Italy di- 
recting Marie Doro. 

RXTD SIGNS NEW CONTRACT 

Wallace Reid has signed a new five-year 
contract with Paramount by which he re- 
ceives a salary that graduates upward on 
a sliding scale. 

LOEW BOOKS BUSHMAN FEATURE 

Marcus Loew has booked the first Vita- 
graph Bushman-Bayne production, "Dar- 
ing Hearts," Sato his entire chain of 
houses..' 



FIRST UNITED- FAIRBANKS NAMED 
-His Majesty the American'' is the title 
of the first Douglas Fairbanks, United 
Artist Picture. 



34 



TH E NEW YORK G L I P P E* 



August 6, 1919 



ACTORS AND MANAGERS HOLD CONFERENCE 

(Continued from Pages 3 and 8) 



United State* Attorney Genexill George W. 

Wickershsm.. This message learned good 
wishes for the success of the organisation 
in its tight for a fair and equitable standard 
cou tract.' IHe ' then read a A^min'i»i«JH«ii 
from Fred Lowen thai, telling Urn of the 
meeting. which was to be herd is Chicago 
laat Sunday night. Then a message was 
read from Milton Sills, who laid thai the 
motion, picture acton in. California were 
with the Equity in there battle with the 
ma ringers and woolo. give any assistance 

reques ted. . . 

Mr. Wilson then la un ched ir> to his spe e ch, 
which, consnuirri siTgrn aajnafraa. . He said 
that it wsa. the first session of the Asso- 
ciated Actors- and Actresses of America. 
He said the issue was whether the actor 
should work eight performances a week or 
be compelled to work on the. .Sabbath also. 
He said tbe actor does not desire to work 
on Sunday, not because he is (religious, bat 
because be is entitled to a' day of rest. 
Bat, should there be a popular movement 
and demand for Sunday shows and should 
their presentation be legalised, tbe actor 
would gladly appear. Bnt he desires to be 
paid extra for Ida services at these per- 
formances. 

"The managers do not want to pa?, and 
that is the line of demarkatinn between 
him and' us," -ha said. 

He then told' about the Century -Theatre 
strike,' said it was only a preliminary 
skirmish and that all of the cumbers acted 
as Heroes and Heroines and was they most 
continue to do so at the call of the Asso- 
ciation, or they wffl not knc,w where they , 
stand. He said many a plefaant day will 
be afforded tbe managers by lie association. 
He said that it was an indisputable fact 
that the managers bad rrWved at all . 
basarda to disrupt tbe Eqiity and that 
tbey would succeed unless tie members of 
the organisation stuck together and pre- 
vented it Continuing, Wihjon said: 
. "Ton nave Victory in the palm of jour 
hands, if you only remain lojrd. Be just as 
loyal aa the aaaatewaai and i.jage hands are. 
Do not keep na here as we '-have been for 
the past six years, unless Von Intend to 
stand by na. Ton have tnejpower to help 
the Association, so do it. J 

Tab play ia what we wijnt and if yon 
do not intend sticking, get cjat now, as we 
do not want yon to betray fas at the laat 
minute. This is a grand of pot-tun] ty asal 
if you pause it wiU take tsju years to do 
again what you might do in one second 
by deserting the cause at a ctudal moment. 

"If yon do not help yoj will get the 
same old pink contract wits the same old 
pink disagreeable conditions under which 
you have suffered. "'If you fiermit them'to 
pat it over on you, you w'31 deserve all 
you- get, Rise up and protest, as this 

light belongs to yon ss act&rs- 

" We wiU welcome the managers if tbey 
only plsy fair- and treat jor with respect 

and consideration. 

"Can yoa imagine the oldj fashioned in- 
telligence and foolish arrogance of the man- 
agers in daring to refuse to recognise tbe 
efforts of ex-President Tart and ex- Justice 
Hughes' efforts to .'act aa jrJzUratora in 
thia matter. They call tlism intruders. 
How dare they refuse to arMtrate and in- 
sult suck great .public mel who. offered 
their services in thia matter. This has 
caused the newspapers to editorialise upon 
the situation and uphold ocjr JsmasS 



3L 



FREE ESS 

HOWTOMAftE-UP 



i .. . Wrifm Caff 

1 M. I^t-win Goamntlo d 

I UO Wol Slat MrwtNni Y*. 

Vs^a^as aass s a »as » «as a a aja ai 



"How honored these men would feel to 
sit down on an intelligent plane with Jake 
and Lee, Abe and Sam, and others. How 
long are you going to stand for this? 

"The managers have never' been your 
friends. God preserve the actor from his 
friends, if -tbey are. ' . ' 

"Be whole hearted and give your efforts 
toward this cause without reserve. Be 
soldiers and follow tbe flag. Whatever in- 
conveniences and losses yon may suffer 
now if will all come back to yon if you 
win follow the flag." 

Charles E. Stevenson was then intro- 
duced, and asked to read tbe resolutions 
which had been prepared. These were 
finally adopted by a ' unanimous vote, after 
several of the speakers had discoursed on 
their benefits snd advantages to tbe organ- 
ization and the actor. They were as fol- 
lows: 

Wbereas. after friendly negotiation, . tbe differ- 
ences ot opinion betewen tbe several labor bodies 
representing the actors and actresses of America 
have been adjusted, and an International body, the 
Assorts tea. Actors and- Artistes of A merles, In 
snulstlon with tbe American federation of Labor, 
has been formed. 

Now therefore be it resolved. That tbe represen- 
tatives and members of tbe several branches here 
represented do hereby pledge devotion, service and 
sacrifice to the cause of tbe actor and snarotee 
tbe loyalty of its members to the American Fede- 
ration of Xabor; and be it farther 

BeaoUed, That we pledge ourselves to confer 
upon our respeeave' councils authority to make 
and enforce such role* controulng arid so re rains 
the action of ladlTldmu members of tbe several 
branches to give 100 per cent, fore* and effect to 
tbe above resolution. ' 

It- 'appearing' that tbe efforts of tbe Actors 
Equity Association, which for six years as* . conr- 
; t*0Q*1y. and. .persistently worked for the ameliora- 
tion of 'conditions of the sctor, are being. Impeded 
by- the 'refusal of tbe Producing Hsssgers'- Asso- 
dsttab'to.deal with It: .' . •'.: 

And It [further appearing that the, -said Acton' 
Equity Association has exhausted ereij honorable 
means to baTe any disputed point* arbitrated,- and 

that ' the: real- Intent of »**^ y -p^wt^ j 1 ar^w■,ym ,^ , 

Aasottseja* i Is to disrupt sndj . If jHaaayj "destroy 
tbe Actors' Equity Association and thus withdraw 
from the SCtor tbe tight Ot collectrre bargaining. 
lecogmaed as a right of labor by the President of 
the United States in April, 1918: 

And w h * t s*s. for the Producing Managers' Asso- 
ciation to succeed on this Issue would be detrimen- 
tal to an actors and actresses; 

Now therefor* be it resolved, That the members 
present pledge themselves to confer upon .their 
respective coancu* the right to give authority to 
tb* International Board of Associated Actor* and 
Artistes of America to formulate such plana snd 
make such agreements with other anasaSssi labor 
bodies la the amusement world as will lead to 
es-operstlve action among an such bodies. 

Grant Stewart was the. first to be called 

upon to speak in favor of the resolution. 
He said, in Dart: 

"The managers hare dr^iberately forced 
thia war on the. Actors*' Bguity Associa- 
tion with the sole intent to destroy the 
organisation. .They are bonded to enforce 
the roles of their association. And one of 
the. first things, apparently, that Jkej Will 
do wgjlbe-to issue an order tiatria., lead 
''receive a salary of, amy, more than 
a -■ week. -They will do this it tbey 
it' they cannot We may lose, bnt 
we can win, and I beg yon to indorse this 
resolution -with heart and sonL" - S. 

Frank OQhnore, who was the next to 
discourse .on the: advantages of- the resolu- 
tion, took seven minutes to make. big plea,: 
He opened his speech by saying the New 
York newspapers- were kind asJssapa to 
give tbe actors a fair deal. He was, bow- 
ever, annoyed by a statement printed in 
one of the papers to the effect that resig- 
nations were pouring into the offices of 
the. equity. . 

"I am ready to go before a -notary pub- 
lic and swear by the books,'' he declared. 
During . May and June there were only 
twelve resignations, and to offset the resig- 
nations, 229 new members. Daring July — 
and I didn't dose the books until 9 o'clock 
but night— there were six . resignations 
from the *Chu Chin Chow' company to the 
Equity Association. Four members of that 
company quit rehearsals because tbe man- 
agement would not grant Equity contracts. 
And daring this last July there were ninety- 
seven new members enrolled by the Equity. 

"For the, month ot July, 1918, there were 
fifteen resignations to the association and 
seventy-one new members," 

It la claimed the total membership of 
Use Actors' Equity Association is u p w ards 
* 4,000. ' r <-i. - 

"Although we are late' getting into la- 
bor," continued Mr. Gnhnore, "we intend 



to be one of the best organizations that 
ever went into that body. We may have 
stumbled in tbe past, bnt. we "are .going 
straight from now on. Didn't we show it 
in our work for the Liberty bond drives T 
We are going to prove- ourselves, and I 
believe we will receive all that labor baa 
to give us.-" ' ••• - " 

"We are going to' ask those individuals 
who now have contracts to prove them- 
selves." 

Hugh Frayne, State' organiser of the 
American Federation of Issbor, was the 
next speaker. " His address was almost en- 
tirely a plea for the principles of arbitra- 
tion in an disputes between employees and 
and employer. He expressed . the greet- 
ings of bis organisation to the new mem- 
bers, and began by expressing his regret 
there should be any cause for disagreement 
between actors and managers. 

"I unhesitatingly endorse every word 
contained ..in tbe resolution offered here," 
he stated.* "I extend to yon the fall sym- 
pathy and support of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor that Justice and right 
may obtain. This controversy will be hon- 
orably settled to tbe 'satisfaction of all 
concerned. 

"The President of this United States 
has bud down the national principle dar- 
ing the war, that whether yon work with 



your bands or with your head, yoa are 
entitled, to organize and to collective bar- 
gaining, with .employers. 

"The idea that actors and actresses by 
joining organized labor must associate 
with., bricklayers, and hod carriers and 
plumbers is stated by your; enemies for a 
purpose. You are here because you could 
not. gain the common recognition that is 
due and accorded to hod carriers, brick- 
layers and plumbers," said Mr. Frayne. 

The. applause was deafening. - 

"No, yon will not be contaminated by 
the bodcarrier, bricklayer and the plumber. 
If it becomes' necessary for all the nod- 
carriers, bricklayers and plumbers to 
withdraw their, patronage. from tbe thea- 
tres they will do it. 

"Your demands are rightful, not only to 
labor, bnt to every fair minded person 'in 
America to obtain that which is rightfully 
yours. We will. give you our aid sue} as- 
sistance. But it is up to you .to go 
through suffering conditions or unite and 
demand a' change of conditions. 

"I see a new page and day for your pro- 
fession, for, up to this .time, on account 
of dignity, yon did not affiliate with labor. 

"But actors must eat. Tbey are not 
different than anyone else." 

These remarks brought a roar of ap- 
plause. 



for Burlesque, Musical Comedy or Dramatic Show. A-NO. 1 CHARACTER 
COMEDIAN. Feature — Banjo Specialty. Indian Wardrobe, exclusive comedy 
song. Will accept best offer. CARL ADAMS ON, 270 W. 39th St, New York 
Phone 2429 Greeley 



BOOKED SOLID— LOEWS CIRCUIT 



DDL, TOM JOKES 



IM 



DIRECTION— UEW LESLIE 



Df VAUDEVILLE 



John Grieve*' talented player* 

presenting- an up-to-date nsntifsl trs ie sty •"* 

^-THE ALLIES' SAFETY PIN 

The exeeihrnl east: Stella Alletta, soprano; Elmie Soldtn, contralto; Gilds Del Tora, mezzo; 
John McDonald, basso; Edward Thomas, tenor; Frank Pillmsn, tenor; Root. J. NeUsen, 
baritone Son- McLean, basso; aad an unexcelled chorus, including *«anrlts Dai Tore's 
Jan Band. A Vaadsviue Ton Notehsr. DtrirMasj Pax. Oa— y Agency. :||_ 



^BT 



DA1V 




la an all star cast MaaaVasl 



NEW YORK FOLLIES *^ 

Com*cV Entitled "A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING.' 



Two Acta and Twatvst 



in"RHYME AJMD REASON 



99 



DDL— JOE MICHAELS 



EDDIE 



ETHEL 



STAFF0RD|j& WATTS 



THAT CLEVER PAIR 



DUL— MEYER B. NORTH 



CLARENCE 



JOHNSON and* PARSON 



ii 



Jazz That's Jazz 

DIRECTION— PHIL BUSH 



II 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



E F. ALBEE 
PitoMini 



J. J. KURDOCK 



F. F. PROCTOR 



B. F. Keith > 
Vaudeville Exchange 

(Ajrency) 

(Palace Theatre Euildinx, Now York) 



B. F. KEITH EDWARD F. ALBEE A. PAUL KEITH 

F. F. PROCTOR— FOUNDERS 



Artists Cam 



Direct far AJdmniS. K. HocLjaVat 



WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

OF THEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX, President 

Executive Offices, 130 West 46th St, New York 
JACK W. LOEB 



EDGAR ALLEN 

PwmmI hUniww with artists from 12 to 6, 



CLIFF E R 

BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisement! not exceeding one lis* is 

length will bo published, properly daaalfied. la 
this index, at the rate of $10 for one year (U 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be not free to each advertiser white the 

advertisement is running. 

LAWYERS. 

Joseph A. O'Brien. 143! Broadway. Now York 

* Edward Doyle. Attorney. 411 Merchants Bank 
Bldg., Indianapolis. Ind. 
James S. Kleinman. Equitable Bldg., 1st 

B'wny, New Yofk City. 
F. L. Boyd. 17 No. La Salle St. . Chicago. 

MUSICAL GLASSES. 
A. Braunncies, 1012 Napier Ave., Richmond Hill. 
N. Y. 

SCENERY. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

m-SCS-H* South Hi»h St, Colwaawsn, O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 

Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 
Wm. W. Delaney. 117 Park Row, New York. 

TENTS. 
J, C Gosi Co., 10 Atwatcr St., Detroit, Mich. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co.. JS7 Washington St., Boa- 
ton, Mass. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 

A. W. Gerstner Co.. 634 8th Ave. (41st St). 

N. Y. ■ 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 

Ben Hobson. 271 West 15<rth St., New York 

City. 

VIOLINS AND SUPPLIES. 
August Gcmunder & Sons, Ml W. 42nd St., 
N. Y. 



TAYLOR TRUNKS 

C. A Taylor Trunk Works 



Attention Vaude ville Acts 

John Quigley ' Theatrical Agency, Inc. 

New England's leading- Independent Agency. Vaudcrille and outdoor attractions 
desired for Summer. Short jumps. 184 Bojiaton St., Boston, Mass. 



ALLEN 
SPENCER 

TENNEY 



VAUDEVILLE WRITER 

1493 Broadway • New York City 

We opened in Pittafield for the United (July 21) 
next to closing, and we were one big hit. The beat 
act we ever had or did.— -G oldie & Ayrcs. 



INSURE YOUR M ATERIAL AGAINST THEFT 

REGIST ER YOU R ACT 

SEND IN YOUR MATERIAL 

THIS COUPON will be numbered and attached and a certificate will be returned to yon as 
an acknowledgment, and for future reference- The contribution should be signed plainly by the 
person or firm sending the same, and should be endorsed by the stage manager of the show or 
of the house where the act is being used or other witnesses. Further acknowledgment will be 
made by the names and numbers being published. 

Address your contributions to 

The Registry Bureau, 

NEW YORK CLIPPER. UM Broadway, Now York 





NEW YORK CLIPPER REGISTRY BUREAU: 




for Registration. 

WAJnr.. «•••••««...««>...«.«.••• .. . ..... . . . 

ADDRESS 





CERTIFICATES ISSUED 

1135— Frederick Wallace. Dialogue and Comedy 1342— Brown, Gardner and Barnett.... Act 

K2~8H ?*SaaS 3TX ""S™ 1 1343-Harvey Denton Original Opening 

zts&SwBi b&s^^^S IgiSSss Soma ■riSS 

1340-The Zateama Special Setting D«-Madam Horns Cronin Material 



1341— Thos. W. Twohig. 



... .Songs 



1346— Van and Vincent.. 



.Material 





DR. FREDERICK SOBEL 

DENTIST 
Office Horn t A. M.-7 P. M. Sossdaye, u 
A M-l P. M. Eveedngs by Appointment. 
Special rates to the profession, lsas Swrwath 
Ave, Bet. UJ-114 th S ts„ New York. Tele- 
phone, Cathedral SZZs. Mirmtar of tka Bar-. 
tsecrue Qui. 



SCENERY 

Diamond Dye, OB or Water Colors 
SCHELL SCENIC STUDIO, COLUMBUS, a 



Wardrobe Prop Trunks, *5. w 

Big Bargain. Have been used. Also a few 
Second Band Innovation and Fibre Ward- 
robe Trunks. $30 and SIS. 
Property Trunks. Also 
and Bal Trunks. 
Parlor Fleer, at W. Hat St, New York City 



A few extra laree 

Also old Taylor Trunks 



MADISON'S BUDGET No. 17 

I contains a liberal assortment of James 
Madison's latest sure-fire monologues, 
parodies, acts for two and more pertorn 
era, minstrel first parts, 200 single gaga. I 
tabloid farce, etc. Price ONE DOLLAR. 
Send orders to JAMES MADISON, UR 
Third Avatnse, New York. 



PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS, ETC 
N. Y. PLAY BUREAU. 360 
Decatur Ave., New York City. 
Stamp for catalog. 



WILLIAM RUSSELL METEBS 

V audatvt l'e> Author 
Mt Palaea TWtrs jkuWsg. Raw Task, 

EddU Leonard, Geo. Falls, Easts 



A. FURMAN 

Theatrical Costnmer for the Best 

Nothing too big nor too small. VaasssFiflss 
—Rums nwleenan Everyone furnished. 
Salesroom— IMt Broadway, Rector 
sat. New York. 



BAL'SDREADNAUGHT 

A GOOD TRUNK AT 
A VERY LOW PRICE. 

BAL'S XX 

• OUR STANDARD TRUNK 
FULLY GUARANTEED.. 

BAL'S STAR 

OUR TRUNK DE LUXE 



WI LLIAM BAL COMPANY 

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THEATRICAL JEWELRY AND 
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High Grade Qualities at Lowest Fries* 
SAMPLES UPON BEQUEST 

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Successors to 

SIECMAN * WEIL 

lSdc20E.27tk.SL Now York 



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Telephones \ 2S } Chaises 

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Far Casual . fa law. Paaslse, Daz., 23*. ss. Cslakfl wet. 
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THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



H in in m tiJ m m 03 m '*« nn mm wi m H 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13, 1919 




III* 



/-'J 




& D. ONIVAS 

lyric 6v "Frank h warren 
writers of "INDIANOLA" 



Slow waltz tempo 



natural J tytf^RUM g u^ f \£U2\\ J i 1 

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ma 



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^ MO KKinGinQ III Mem- or-ies are turn -ing to days of long a - go, 



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And your heart is yearn- ing for one you used to know; 






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Cop.-right MCMXVm by Jos. W. Stem & Co. New York 
British Copyright Secured 

roton <JOS. W. STERN U CO. mc . c 

™?X2?rr PROFESSIONAL STUDIOS „£!?!$£?& 

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Copyrighted. 1919, and published weekly by tie Clipper Corporation. 1 604 Broadway. New York. Entered at the Poet-oflice at New York. June 24, 1879. aa aacondclaas mlil matter under Act of Much S, 1879. 



- Founded by 
PRANK QUEEN,. 1853 ' ; , 



NEW YORK, AUGUST 13, 1919 



' VOLUME LXVn-No. B 

Price. Ten' Cent*. $4.4)0 a Year 



HIGH RENTS HAVE 

HIT REHEARSAL 

HALLS 

EVERYTHING BEING USED . 



a>' : 'tJp to <■* time of the beginning of the 
actors' strike late last week, there was a 
grreatacKOty of rehearsal halls. la some 
instanc>es,Vthe situation became so acute 
for producers that they offered bonuses to 
owners for quarters iu which rehearsals 
.could be conducted. 

Charles B. Dillingham is one producer 
' who- was hit hard, for it was reported that 
two of his agents offered to lease Unity 
Hall at 341 West Forty-seventh street, 
after, failing to obtain rehearsal quarters 
there. Dillingham had five musical shows 
ready' for rehearsal. These were the new 
I Fritz Kreizler show, "Jack-o'-Lantern," 
'•'-"She's a Good Fellow" (chorus), "The 
1 -.Canary," and a new . musical show by 
\ Jerome Kern, as yet without a title. 
\ Nor is Dillingham's predicament due to 
-.-* any lack of foresigntedness on his part, for, 
• iaa early as last December, he leased Academy 
PUa, at 115 West Seventy-ninth street, 
"ie period of his lease extending from June 
to September 15, and paying at the rate 
$30 a day for both rooms and the bowl- 
s' alley downstairs. 

Of course, producers like the Shuberts 
have a number of theatres which they can 
utilize during the day for rehearsal pur- 
poses, so they are not affected by the situ- 
ation. But those who do not control a 
string of theatres are feeling the situation 
Tteenly, which is because more shows are 

being produced this season than ever before. 
As a result almost every hall that has a 
piano in it, from Fourteenth street to the 
Bronx, is being used. 

Coutts and Tennis, after trying vainly 
for a week to rent a hall in which to re- 
hearse their "Kiss Burglar" road show, 
finally obtained quarters in Yorkvflle 
Casino in East Eighty-sixth street, where 
they: had to rent one of the rooms for a 
minimum period of two weeks, paying $65 
- for that period. 

A f list of some of the shows rehearsing 
at present in several of the better known 
halls lying contiguous to the theatrical 
section reveals the crowded condition that 
prevails. 

At Unity Hall, on West Forty-seventh 
street. Billy Lovatt, superintendent, stated 
last week that, for the past four weeks, on 
in average of four producers have been 
ftirnej down by him becanse the rooms 
■were being used and will be until the lat- 
\ ter part of this month. The producers 
I who ere rehearsing shows there at present 
■A are: Strauss and Franklyn, "Around the 
W\ Town.'Va burlesque show; Aubry Mitt en - 
j 'thalts "Dancing Widows," and John Corf a 
| "Ftewls." T. W. Dinkins is also rehears- 
B ice; a toow there. 

' In addition to these there are a number 
of Tandyflle acts rehearsing, among which 
is ""rtj^id^l Night" I,, -."-, 

" ar *RG? rlrd £•' rehearsing two of his 
burlesq^Uiows at the Yorkvflle Casino, 

ICtHtinued on page 33.) 



"ESCAPE COUPLE" ARRESTED 

Los Angeies, Cat, Aug. 8. — The police 
have arrested in connection with one of the 
biggest grand larceny cases of the year, W. 
EL LeRoy, who, they claim, is an "Escape 
Artist," and, with his wife, did an act on 
the Orpheum Circuit known as "The Le- 
Roy Escape Couple." LeRoy and his wife, 
according to the police, retired several 
years ago, and bought a ranch in Colorado. 

They did not succeed, so, it is said, they 
mortgaged the cattle. Later they sold the 
cattle and also two touring cars they had 
mortgaged . and disappeared. They have 
been sought since then and were finally ap- 
prehended by Deputy Sheriff J. H. Magee, 
of Pueblo county, where they had their 
ranch. 



BEBAN SUED FOR SLANDER 

Los Aitoeles, Cal., Aug. 9. — Through a 
settlement out of court and subsequent dis- 
missal, there became known today, for the 
first time, the fact that George Beban, the 
motion picture star, had been sued for 
$15,000 on a charge of slander, by Robert 
A. Dillon, a scenario writer. 

Beban, who had lost his wallet in a 
hotel, is alleged to have remarked, "that 
man Dillon got my wallet," 

Dillon says that the purse was found by 
a porter and returned to Beban and when 
Beban refused to retract the remark, he 
sued. The amount of settlement was not 
stated. 



ACTOR GOES INSANE 

San Francisco, Aug. 8. — Hayden 
Stevenson, an actor, suddenly went insane 
this week while at Market and Powell 
Streets. He started to shout the lines from 
"Tea For Three," in which he had been ap- 
pearing in the Northwest, and grew so 
demonstrative that he was placed under 
arrest. He was taken to a detention hos- 
pital and there it was thought that he was 
suffering from shell-shock, for in his mut- 
terings he was heard to repeat something 
about "Prance" and "shells." 



CIRCUS TRAINS BEING HELD UP 

Exor?f, 111., Aug. 9. — Circuses being 
routed through the Chicago railroad yards, 
should be careful in securing trains, as the 
agents are eery careless and frequent re- 
ports of lost matinees due to delayed trains 
have been made. The AL G. Barnes show 
recently lost a matinee in this town, when 
it was delayed by the 'carelessness of Chi- 
cago traffic agents. The show made up at 
the night performance, despite a traction 
strike here, but it should not have lost the 
matinee. 



COAST MANAGER VERY ILL 

San Francisco, Cal., Aug. 9. — S. H. 
Freidlander, a veteran theatrical manager 
of this city, is under the care of physicians 
and nurses at the home of his daughters in 
Log Angeles, having been forced to retire 
from business, after a prolonged fight 

against retirement due to illness- 



YELLED "KILL COPS!" "PINCHED" 

Sam Francisco, Aug. 9. — William B. 

Carr, an actor, was arrested here this week 

during a riot between the police and some 

soldiers' in front of the Grand HoieL Carr, 

-who' was present, yelled: "Kilt the cops '." 

"and one of the party mentioned immediately 

got after him. 



STAGE HANDS WONT STRIKE • S 
WITH OUT 30 DAYS' NOTICE 

Union Heads, Approached for Support in Equity Trouble, Confer 
Over Subject and Majority Decide as Above — 

Shuberts and Ziegf eld Sue Actors. J ' 



The stage bands will refuse to go out in 
sympathy with the Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion in their strike against the producing 
managers of their own volition and, if 
compelled to do so, will insist upon giving 
the managers thirty days notice of their 
intention. This is the preponderance of 
opinion of the union heads after a series of 
informal discussions which have been held 
upon the matter since the strike began. 
It was reported early this week that the 
A. E. A., had applied to diem for their 
support, as was also - done with the 
musicians, which made it necessary for 
both bodies to give the matter some con- 
sideration, i 

The musicians have not stated their 
stand in the matter, but, should they de- 
cide to take any action whereby they will 
want to aid the actors in their fight, they 
will have to submit it to the local union 
members for action. It would take several 
days, if not a week, before the members of 
the organization could have the matte; pre- 
sented to them, discuss it and vote accord- 
ing to their judgment. 

One of the heads of the stage hands 
union who is known to voice the sentiments 
of the local, says that, morally, they axe 
obligated to stand with affiliated labor, but 
that they feel that the actors are a new 
organization and that, to the minds of 
some, joined the ranks of labor' for the 
sole purpose of getting aid in what de- 
veloped to be the present emergency. He 
declared that they would prefer to have 
the actor- stand 'on his own resources with- 
out involving the other organisations iu 
his quarrels. •> 

Firing their first gun in a legal field, 
the managers resorted to the courts on 
Monday to restrain the A. E. A, and its 
members from interfering with productions. 
The first move was a suit filed in the 
United States District Court of the 
Southern District of New York, by the 
i Winter Garden Company, against 300 
prominent members of the Equity, for ag- 
gregate damages of $500,000. 

In their complaint, the Winter Garden 
Company state they operate the shows 
"Shuberfs Gaities of 1919" and "Monte 
Cristo, Jr.," the former playing at the 44th 
Street theatre and the latter at the Winter- 
garden. 

It states that Francis Wilson, president ; 
Frank GiUmore, executive secretary and 
Richard A. Pnrdy, treasurer of the A. E. 
A., and the other persons named as de- 
fendants, are citizens and residents of tile 
State of New York and have actively par- 
ticipated in and directed ' the acta com- 
plained of. 

It alleges that- not only did the Actors' 
Equity Association prevent players from 
working, but, in instances, threatened to 
stone players if they did appear. The com- 
plaint is made by Bainbridge Colby and 
William Klein aa eonnsul for the Winter- 
garden Company and is signed by Lee 
Shnbert, as vice-president. - 
. The complaint in this esse follows the 
- precedent of the general . lines of the 
famous "Danbury" hatters ease of several 



years ago, when judgment was awarded 
against the striking, hatters as individual* 
and as members of a union, for conspiracy 
and for preventing others from working. 

The Winter Garden Company also ap- 
plied for injunctions severally and collec- 
tively against the members of the Actors* 
Equity Association, as 'individuals and as 
members of the .organization, to restrain 
them from acting in any way to interfere 
with the performances of the shows men- 
tioned above. The name of Ralph Hera 
originally appeared as one of the defendants 
in this action as it was at first reported 
that Hen had left the Winter Garden: 
but late Monday afternoon he resigned 
from the Equity and returned to the Win- 
ter Gqrden, after missing two performances. 
. The complaint states that the "Gaities of 
1919" Involved a production expenditure of 
$100,009 and that $15,000 has been ex-, 
pended in advertising the show since its 
initial performance, June 94th. 

. It then speetfiea that, aa a result of the 
activities of the defendants on and prise to 
Aug.-: 7th, Ed. Wynn, George HasseU, Kuy 
.Kendall, Barry Fender, William Kent, Ted 
Lorraine. Gladys Walton' Muriel. TlndalL 
Sam. White, Lew Clayton, Stewart Baird and 
Morjerie Gateson, widely known sa> perform- 
ers to theatregoers left the employ of the 

plaintiff to strike In the cause of tie Acton' 
organisation. 

In the application for 
plaintiff demands judgment _ 
ants and each of them, and each ot their 
officers, agents. Servants, employees, andat- 
nd SST~ 



the Injunction the 
atfhst . UK- def and- 



torney and _ 

five concert with them, be' restrained per- 
petually and during the pendency or. ihis 
action,' from: ■ -i.c;, ,-, .?«.'.;-'■ :«'• 

(a>— Interfering or attempting .to inter- 
fere with the plaintiffs employees and from 
wilfully bringing about by pIslBtisTs em- 
ployees of contracts of service existing with 
the plaintiff's present and- future, employees, 
and '■• . " 

(b)— Prom wilfully and ' unlawfully ln- 

: doting such employees present and to tare, to 

leave -plaintiff's service and from In terf urns 

or attempting . to Interfere with 'plaintiff's 

- employees, and 

t'c) —From compelling ox inducing or at- 
tempting to compel or Induce by threats, in- 
tlmfdatlon. coercion, or abusive and' violent 
language, any of the plaintiff's employees to 
leave its services or fall or refuse to per- 
form their duties, as. such employees or com- 
pelling ' or . attempting to compel by like 
meana any person itaeMng- to seek employ- 
meat therein. « 

(d)— That the strike resolutions of the de- 
fendant association In so far as It affects or 
relates to employees of the plaintiff, PFte ant 
or future, with, respect to -whom it has or 
shall have contracts of service, be declared 
Illegal and void. - . .TV- 

IS) — That the defendant association. Its 
officers, members, agents and servants be 
enjoined and restrained from taking any 
further steps, or proceedings in furtherance 
of or in execution of the strike resolution 
and the conspiracy referred to In this Mil 
to so far as It applies or relates to 
ployees of the plaintiff with 
contracts of service. 

(f) — That the plaintiff have such -other 
and further reflet as may be just- 
Is;) — That the plaintiff recover the sum 
of f 800, OOO damages. 

With the announcement "I feel honored to 
announce that 1 have become, to-day, a mem- 
ber of the Producing Managers' ffssocU- 
tlon." being sent to .the Actor? Eatrlty Aaso- 
, elation to reply to their . ultimatum that he 
declare his position. Flo. ZiegfeM had 
Mortimer Foshel lnstitnta In the New York 
Court p ro cee din gs for as Injuac- 

(Continutd on page 23.) 



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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13, 1919 



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BJl. T. STRIKE HIT BROOKLYN 

AND CO NEY ISLA ND BUSINESS 

Island Attraction* Alone Estimated to Have Lost $800,000— 

Hendersons and New Brighton Vaudeville Houses 

Suffer from Traffic Tie-Up. 



- As a result of the strike on the Brook- 
ITU Rapid Transit lines, amusements in 
Brooklyn all suffered a decrease in busi- 
ness last week, although the effects were 
much more marked in some sections of the 
city than in others. Samuel W. Gumpertz, 
president of the Coney Island Board of 
Trade, says Coney Island alone lost 
$8OO,000. 

The Island and Brighton Beach were 
particularly bard hit by the strike, and 
business at the first, which, in this season 
under present weather conditions, could 
be record-breaking, was very poor because 
of Coney's inaccessibility. In fact, from a 
standpoint of attendance, it looked like 
early Winter at tbe Island. As far as the 
.concessionaires were concerned, tbe snow 
might as well have been on tbe ground, for 
business would have been no less brisk. 

With tbe exception of automobile parties 
and those who journeyed out in rubber- 
neck wagons and auto-trucks, the place was 
■ deserted, and the owners of concessions ad- 
mitted that they were playing a losing 
game. 

The New Brighton Theatre played to 
empty houses. The small crowd that 
braved the strike and came out to the 
Island was in no mood to see vaudeville 
and, in the words of one of the officials 
connected with the theatre, "business was 
absolutely killed." 

It was admitted at the booking offices 
that tbe same condition was met at Hen- 
derson's Music Hall, the performers play- 
ing to empty chairs. 

Not the least difficult task was to get 
the employees of these theatres to and 
from work safely and promptly, and this 



difficulty was coped with by employing 
taxis and charging the bills up to tbe house. 

The performers, on the Brighton and 
Henderson bills were asked early last week 
to move to the Hotel Sbelbourne, at Brigh- 
ton, so that they, would be near the theatres 
at which they were to appear. In this way, 
the bills were not held up through per- 
formers being unable to reach the Island 
in time to appear promptly. 

The Orpheum business kept up fairly 
well. Other than that there were more 
late comers than usual, business was good. 
This was due to the fact that tbe Orpheum 
is near the subway line. A big motor t-aCK 
which carried the sign of the Orpheum was 
kept busy -transporting working girls to 
and from their destinations. 

The Locw houses' chief concern in 
Brooklyn was to see that the acta arrived 
in time, but there was not much trouble in 
this particular, although most of the per- 
formers had to avail themselves of taxi 
cabs to reach tbe theatres. 

Neighborhood bouses drew much of their 
regular patronage, as most of the small- 
time houses are either close to the subway 
or to the Long Island Railroad, either of 
which put them within easy reach. 

When the Long Island Railroad made a 
temporary terminus at Railway avenue, the 
business of the Bushwick was somewhat 
affected. A bus at the Long Island ter- 
minus charged $1,00 per passenger to the 
Bushwick Theatre. Performers appearing 
at the Bushwick who would not stand for 
this extortion were forced to walk tile Long 
Island ties for several blocks, just as 
theatrical legend says all thespians did be- 
fore the days of better salaries. 



WOOED HER WITH CHEESE 

Montreal, Aug. 10. — Ada Wingard, an 
actress, yesterday filed papers in a breach 
of promise suit against Thomas H. Ryan, 
a local merchant, for $10,000 and disclosed 
a letter in which he announced the sending 
of some cheese to her in place of chocolates. 

Miss Wingard. who had a prominent 
part in "Experience" at Hia Majesty's 
Theatre her* in 1917, was introduced to 
Ryan by a mutual friend. He gave several 
dinner parties, luncheons and suppers for 
her, she says, and then went to Ottawa 
when the show had to go to that city, an- 
nouncing at a party there that he would 
marry her. Last December, when she re- 
turned to Montreal, Ryan continued to 
make love to her and made her several 
gifts of jewelry, she says, < 

The question of religion had a direct ef- 
fect upon the marriage question, for Ryan 
is a Catholic and Miss Wingard a protes- 
tant. The plaintiff states that she forsook 
her theatrical career upon Ryan's promise 
to marry her, but that he failed to abide 
by the promise. Because of her engage- 
ment to Ryan, she further states, she re- 
jected a number of proposals from other 
men. Ryan will fight the action, he says. 



SAYS HUSBAND WAS BURDEN 

San Francisco, Aug. 11. — An annul- 
ment of her marriage to Frank L. Vallient, 
formerly a lieutenant in the Aviation 
corps, was granted to Helen Collier, by 
Judge Flood, last week. In her testimony 
tbe actress declared! that, her husband had 
been only a burden to her, having bor- 
rowed more than $1,000, which he never 
gave back. Legal fees and traveling ex- 
penses from tbe East to San Franrtaco to 
get the divorce is another item she in- 
cludes. She further stated that she bad 
never lived with Vallient. 

The day 'before Christmas in 1017, she 
said, he told her that if she did not marry 
him he would commit suicide. She did not 
agree to marry him immediately, declaring 
that she had not known him long enough. 
He wooed so ardently, however, that she 
married him the next day. It was then, 
she says, that he borrowed tbe $1,000 and 
left her. Vallient is now in Texas and 
made no effort to contest tbe annulment 
suit 



VALUES PLAYLET AT $10,000 

Paul Dickey, the playwright, last week 
fixed the sum of $10,000 as the value of 
bis one-act play, "The Come-Back," for 
motion picture purposes. He stated that, 
had not the Mutual Film Corporation used 
the title for one of its film productions, 
he could have obtained $10,000 for the 
motion picture rights of the playlet. He 
subsequently developed it into a three- 
act drama for the legitimate stage, which 
was rejected by producers because tbe 
film company bad used tbe title; 

Dickey was . testifying before William 
Klein, tbe -Shubert attorney, who was ap- 
pointed referee by the Appellate Division, 
in the suit be brought against the Mutual 
Film Corporation for alleged' unfair com- 
petition and an ' accounting. ' He churned 
that the film company bad adopted the 
title "The Come-Back" for one of its fea- 
ture pictures, after he bad popularized the 
title through his playlet, which be pre- 
sented in vaudeville throughout the coun- 
try for sixty weeks. 

He sued in the Supreme Court, where - 
he received a verdict in hia favor against 
the Mutual Film Corporation, the court's 
decree providing for an accounting, in ad- 
dition to the injunctive relief granted. 
However, the film company appealed to 
the Appellate Division, the higher court 
modifying the judgment of the court be- 
low, the modification being that there 
was to be no accounting; that a referee 
was to be appointed simply to pass on the 
extent of the damages suffered by Dickey 
and compute the amount in the referee's 
estimation, proved. 

In answer to questions put to him by 
II. B. Brownell, attorney for the Mutual 
Film Corporation, Dickey stated that the 
smallest amount he ever received from 
any film company for the motion picture 
right to any of bis plays was $3,500, and 
the largest amount was $17,000. 

In rebuttal Nathan Burkan, Dickey's 
attorney, brought out that Dickey re- 
ceived $10,000 for the motion picture 
rights to his play "The Misleading Lady." 

Referee Klein adjourned the hearing to 
' give Dickey a chance to produce witnesses 
familiar with the value of plays for mo- 
tion picture purposes. It was said that 
William Harris would testify for Dickey. 

WANTS TO CENSOR LOBBIES 

Seattle, Wash., Aug. 9. — Mayor Ole 
Hanson has been asked, by Alice Lord, 
secretary of the Seattle Board of Theatre 
Censors, for jurisdiction over the lobby ad- 
vertising in the theatres of the city. Tbe 
board has asked that the present ordinance 
governing theatre censorship be amended 
in such manner as would give it the author- 
ity. 

The board claims that theatre managers 
resort to a good deal of fake advertising in 
lobby displays, and therefore censorship 
over them is needed. Tbe Mayor referred 
the request to the City Council. 



BREWSTER CO. AFTER HOUSES 
Boston, Mass., Aug. 9. — The Brewster 
Amusement company has announced the 
firing over of a number of theatres through 
New England, by their firm. The com- 
pany bas bad a very successful Park sea- 
son, running five parka and five shows. W. 
Lawrence Gallagher, who is In charge at 
Dover, goes to Portland, Me., on September 
1. Fred Brewster and M. J. Meary axe to 
remain in charge of the Boston offices. 



ACTOR TO BUILD HOTEL 

New London, Mass., Aug. 11. — James 
O'Neill mat week sold bis Summer borne 
and a 'large plot of water-front property to 
the T. A. Scott Wrecking Company. 
O'Neill, who' recently secured a piece of 
property on Green Street here, intends to 
build a large hotel for men on tbe site, in 
conjunction with several other, men of 
prominence. O'Neill has figured in a num- 
ber of deals here lately, the sums involved 
totaling about $100,000. 



ENGAGED FOR HIP SHOW 
Bert Levy and Edwin Hansford have 
been engaged for next season's Hippo- 
drome Show. They were with the snow 
last i 



"MOUERE" TO CLOSE 
San Francisco, Aug. 7.— Henry Miller 
and Blanche Bates, in "Moliere," axe 
scheduled to close at tbe Columbia, here, 
on August 9. "Chin Chin," accompanied 
by Tom Brown's Saxophone Band, ia 
slated to open there on' August 11. 



OLD PROCTOR HOUSE REOPENS 

Albany, Aug. 9. — The old Proctor's An- 
nex, now known as the "Albany Theatre," 
will re-open on Monday, Aumist 11, as a 
motion picture house. The theatre is now 
owned by Samuel Suckno. 

The theatre has been entirely rebuilt. 
The floor ia now on an Incline which will 
permit patrons to see the pictures from any 
part of the house. New upholstered chairs 
and a new ventilating system have been in- 
stalled. Tbe interior has been beautifully 
decorated and the house will show first run 
productions, with an orchestra accompani- 
ment. 



SINOPOULO GOING TO GREECE 

Obxahoica Cttt, Okla., August 11. — 
John Sinopoulo, local theatrical man, left 
last week on a journey which will take him 
to Gr ee c e, where he will visit hia aged 
parents in Sparta. He will atop at St. 
Louis and Chicago on bis way to New 
York, whence he will leavj for France. 
While he is away, Peter Sinopoulo, bis 
brother, will look after bis interests. Tbe 
latter is the manager of the Lyric here. 



HOP WOOD SCORES AGAIN 

Wabhinoton, D. C, Aug.- 11.— Avery 
Hopwood has 'scored. 'again, this time with 
a near naughty, farce called, Til Say She 
Does," which had its first presentation at 
tbe Garrick here last night. 'Although a 
trifle risque in spots, "I'll Say She Does" 
fails to develop vulgarity and scores 
laughs at the rate of one a minute. 

"Ill Say She -Does" is built upon the 
complications that -arise when Herbert 
Wanren, tired of stumbling over admirers 
of his- wife in his home, induces his friend 
Bobo Brown to make love to the elusive 
wife .. with the object of discovering her 
fascination for the "Lounge Lizards" that 
are luring her away, Bobo, however, gets 
a date with Mrs. Warren at his apartment 
mixed up with a date with one of his 
fair young friends, and aet two finishes 
a la whirlwind, with Hubby Warren satis- 
fied that Bobo has double-crossed him. 
The tangle is eventually untangled with 
all parties happy in a finale that is rip- 
roaring. 

Tbe Garrick Players, L. M. Bell and 
George Marshall's Stock Company, to 
which the presentation was entrusted, 
handled the piece well. 

Lynne Overmann in the part of Bobo 
Brown scores heavily with bis ad lib com- 
- cdy , while ' Eileen Wilson, well adopted, to 
a vamp role, walks away with tbe part 
of the elusive Mrs. Warren. Earle Foxe 
in the part of the husband gives a char- 
acterization that is unusually fine. Others 
who earned good notices were William 
Pringle, Grace Peters and Donald Mc- 
Donald. 



SELL TREE'S STAGE EFFECTS 

Montreal, Ang. 7. — The scenery and 
stage effects used by tbe bite Sir Herbert 
Beerbohm Tree in "■Henry VIII," "The 
Merchant of Venice" and "Tbe Merry 
Wives of Windsor," which have been stored 
here since March, 1917, were sold yester- 
day at auction. The whole must have cost 
$20,000, say the auctioneers, Rae and Don- 
nelly, and they brought about $400. 

Six carloads of stage properties were 
stored here when Sir Herbert left In 
March, 1917, and were to have been for- 
warded to Australia, but shipping facilities 
could not be provided. Sir Herbert died in 
England on July 2, 1917. 

The costumes were shipped soon after 
Sir Herbert's departure from Montreal, 
but the scenery has been in storage ever 
since at the rate of $150 a month. The 
executors of the estate authorized Rae and 
Donnelly to dispose of the effects at public 
auction. There is $1,200 duty on the prop- 
erty still in tbe Customs House and, owing 
to the fact that this sum could not be re- 
alized at auction, the goods were not put 
up and will probably be disposed of later 
by the Government. " v 



RUTH ST. DENIS SCORES 

San Francisco, CaL, Aug. 8. — Ruth St 
Denis has scored a pronounced success in 
a play written especially for her by Con- 
stance Smedley Armfield entitled "Miriam, 
Sister of Moses." The music was composed 
by Professor E. G. Stricken. 

The new drama received its debut at the 
Greek Theatre in Berkeley a few nights 
ago, packing the theatre to a comfortable 
capacity. The vehicle gives Miss St Denis 
a speaking part and this somewhat unusual 
role was received with marked apprecia- 
tion. 

It is the most spectacular production 
that has ever been staged at the Greek The- 
atre, based upon episodes in early Jewish 
history. Ted Shawn, her husband, In the 
role of Moses, gave an excellent portrayal. 

A chorus of two hundred and a 
mented orchestral accompaniment at 
the impressive effect of the produtw 

Professor Sam Hume, of the University 
of California, directed the production. 



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BACON SELLS NEW PLAT 

Frank Bacon, star of "Lightnin'," has 
written another play called "Five O'clock," 
which be bas sold to Walter Wanger. 



CAR GET NEW PLAT 

Cohan and Harris but week 
the producing rights of a new 
ten by Paul Dickey, author of 
leading Lady" and. other plays, 
will produce early next falL 
bow* Bridge" ia tbe title 
which is a three-act comedy 




writ- 
Mis- 
'eh they 
" Bain- 

p«y, 



Aaguit 13, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



PROHIBITION AIDS BUSINESS 

TOWN SHOWS ?RpSPEKCttiS 



The Effects of Dry Law Are Very Favorable to Summer {Show* 



m 



and Pieturea^Cnbaret Patrons Flocking to 



Theatrical Attraction*. 






The effects of prohibition on the business 
of such houses as have been running 
throughout the Summer, has been favorable 
to the management of shows and houses 
alike.' Threatrlcal attractions are now get- 
ting : the business that formerly went to 
cabarets and cafes. 

Many men have been in: the .habit of 
Spending the two hours between business 
closing time and dinner time, in the bars 
of hotels or in corner saloons. A large 

majority of amusement seekers would go to 
the cabarets because they combined the bar 
and the theatre. Now; however, they find 
that the performances at the cabarets are 
vastly inferior to the regular theatrical per- 
formances', and so a good, many of them 
have turned ' to the theatre as a means Of 
amusement. , ' 

, This has resulted in an unusually good. 
Summer season for. many musical and- road 
shows and - motion. ■ pictures, which ' have 
been' the greatest beneficiaries. of the law. 
Such -shows as have .been running in Bos- 
ton, Chicago, San. Francisco,' - and towns 



all over the country have reported hugely 
successful runs and financially successful 
tours. ■■ , . . ■ 

Among die shows. that. have been doing 
good business are "See Saw," which opened 
in Boston last week, and has been making 
money; "A Prince There Was," and 
"Scandal." "I Love Ton," and "Angel 
Face," which have been -packing Chicago 
audience* in to the tune of $14,000 a week 
average.- 

; "Tea For Three" was forced to cancel 
after a three weeks' run in Log Angeles, 
only because of a contract which gave El- 
tinge the house for the week following, and 
so the show moved on. its tour,, despite de- 
mands from Los. Angeles audiences for its 
continuance. In Boston, "Oh. My Dear !" 
and "Havana" have been doing about $10,- 
000 a week. . .. .j • 

This is indicative of even greater sue-; 
cess daring the regular seasons. These re- 
turns, it must be' noted, are greater by far 
in the thickly populated districts, than in 
the rural sections. 



HILL MINSTRELS SHOW PEP - 

Lono Bnaifca," N.^X^Aug/'iO.— The 

opening of the Gns Hill Minstrels bete in 
their new show packed the local theatre, 
and the audience enjoyed in excellent pro- 
duction of the old-time variety, hot with 
the, gags and songs brought up to date. 
"The production .was staged by James 

^ Gorman, an^old-tiine_ minstrel man,, and 
« if »»Ued;r through \ its. premiere performgaos 
^^Witbput a hitch; Numbers by the Mnsfael 
Gates and ,#e Markwith Brothers, who 
form a sextette of «TAply>n f players, 
stopped the show. 

The roster of comedians is. headed by- 
George Wilson and Jimmle Wall, who put 
over their stuff in sure-fire style, with 
William H. Halle tt as the interlocutor. 
A quartette consisting of Carl Graves, Her- ' 
bert WOlison, fred Freddy and James 
Brennan, furnished harmony that . won 
warm applause. Other comedians who got 
a good share of laughs were Jack Kennedy, 
Lee Edmonds, and' Rudy Willing.. 

The entire cast consists of forty-five per- 
formers. An orchestra of twenty pieces is 
under the direction of Neil Sullivan. 
Charles A. Williams is directing the tout 
and Colonel Sam Dawson. is in advance. 
i The first part and olio bubbles over with 
up-to-minute Jokes, solos and chorus u um- 
bers, accompanied by a splendid stringed 
orchestra. The second part, in which- the 
specialties are introduced, went off with 
plenty of snap, featuring the saxophone 
players, Wilson and Wall, and the quar- 
tette. •••_ 



SELWYNS OPEN "BUDDIES" 

NEwrbBT, R. I., Aug. 9.-— "Buddies," a 
new; play, was presented here last night 
by the Selwyns, of New York preparatory 
to its opening in Boston, Tuesday. .. 

The play is by George V. Hobart, sup- 
plemented with special musical numbers 
bj Melville Gideon and B. C. William. It 
is. not a musical comedy in the usual sense, 
for the melodious and really musical selec- 
tions are skillfully used aa incidental. 

The action of. "Buddies" takes place in 
Brittany at . the time the American army 
was there, and la'- centred about the home 
of Mme. Benoit, where, a squad of soldiers 
is: biliited. Mme. Benoit's son has been 
killed, in battle, and she has a very attrac- 
tive daughter with whom one of the Bud- 
dies, "Babe," la in love, but whose diffi- 
dence keeps him, from dectariog himself. I _ 

The girl, though loving "Babe" is almost 
ready to sacrifice' herself to one I'ctllbois, 
who claims that. Mme. Benoit owes, him, 
money. But the' matter is cleared up be 
fore the boys are ordered home, and. the 
curtain falls on two happy pairs 'of lovers 
as the. bugle sounds taps and the., soldiers 
lie down in the barn for their last night in 
France.: ■•' .'.'.',..' • •'■'■." 

.''While there. is nothing especially novel, 
about the plot, still, "Buddies" is full of 
' good,- wholesome humor and a little pathos. 
The life. of. the soldiers in the pleasant 
*>: Breton town forms a good background for 
the action, the music is good and the whole 
thing enjoyable. .... . ~ 

The piece is excellently given, Wallace 
I Eddinger making a very funny "Babe". 
Donald Brian a fine "Sonny" and Peggy 
Wood a captivating "Julie." The "Al- 
"Alphonse Petitbois" of Edouard Durand 
itr a capital piece -of acting, and Camille 
Dalberg, as' Mme. Benoit, was very con- 
vincing. V 

Maxiue Brown, as Louise Maitland, 
played her part with ability, and her danc- 
ing with "Sonny" was one of. the features 
'•■ of the evening. , 

.,"• ..Marie and Babette, two very attractive 
■■^i little Breton maidens, were acted by - An- 
"netteMonteil and Pauline Garon. All the 
musical numbers were well given. 
i- i Curtain calls were numerous at the end 
pf each act, and the play looks like a win- 
ner. '..-.•. --\ ;-.;■■ 

TANGUAY OWNS COAST PROPERTY: 

P. : Los Angeles, Cal., Aug. 9. — Eva Tan- 
gnay wired, to the county clerk here last 
week that the only property she possesses' 
in this city is at 2002 Hilcrest Road. She 
wired 1 from Coney- Island, •N.'.Y..- when' she. 
received an assessment on some property.' 



WILL REMODEL BERWICK HOUSE 

Bica wick. Pa., Aug. 8. — Plans have been 
completed here -whereby the local Opera 
House is to be completely remodelled. 
About $40,000 will be spent in making the 
structure '.one' of the oat modern in this 
section, ' and the seating capacity increased 

to 1,200. G. EV Sitler made the plans for 
the new and remodelled structure. 

The house will be ready for an opening 
in October. • Bonds are being sold to finance 
the project I The new board Of directors 
chosen is as follows:. Charles Boss, Elmer 
Cochran. O. K. McHenry, John Bogart, 
William Hortman, A L. Scheerer, Harry 
Young, Frank Fowler and Nelson Kramer. 
The advisory board which will take np the 
matter of improvements is as follows: J. 
U. Kurtz, B. S. Bowman, Elmer Klinger, 
J. M. Harry and Earl M. Cortwright. 



. MADDOCK COMPLETES CAST 

Chas. B. Haddock has completed the 
cast of "Nothing But. Loye," which opens 
at the Teck Theatre, Buffalo, Sept. 1, goes 
to Detroit the following week and then 
comes to . New York. The ■ cast now is 
comprised of Andrew Tombs,. who has the 
principal comedy role > Ruby Norton, 
prima donna; Stanley . H. Forde, Donald 
Meek, Clarence Nordstrom, .Phil. Bishop, 
John Kocbe, Robert Woolsey, Easton 
Yonge, Jack McSoriey, ", Betty Pierce. 
Florence Enright and Florence Mills. 
There is also a chorus of sixteen. . ' 

The music is the work of Harold Orlob, 
who also' wrote, the music for "Listen, 
Lester." Frank Stammers i 8 responsible 
for the book. and lyrics: 



. COOPER IN LEGITIMATE . 

' Harry Cooper, formerly a' bnrtssuue 
comedian with "The Sporting wTdbws," 
has been engaged for Dupre and Camp's 
"Half a Widow." The show opena in At- 
lantic City on August 25, and moves 'into 
the Knickerbocker later in the season. 



ENDS FRISCO RUN 

San Francisco, Cal., Aug. 1L— "Tea 
For Three," which ran three weeks here, 
dosed Saturday night and - is being suc- 
ceeded by "Lombardi Ltd.," jrith Leo Car- 
rfllo. . "Tea. For Three" goes South toward 
Los Angeles. . 



TO HOLD HGUSEWARM1NG 

. When Raymond Hitchcock returns from 
his; preliminary; road tour with; "Hitcby- 
Bjop- he will give a house .warming at 
bis new home on West Twenty-fourth 
street. 



HAS ALL-MIDGET 'TOLLIES" 

- Mat Kuasell has gathered together a 
talented company of midgets, whom he will 
present in a musical comedy called "The 
Midget Follies." This is something new 
in the way of musical comedy, as the entire 
company, including chorus girls, will be 
midgets., The cast of the show includes 
Tianita Midgets. Casper Wela and Queen 
Mab. Helen Wickham, Lonia and Isabel 
Stoeffler, Liable and Nelson and Major Dos 
Ward, and a ohorue of ten girls. 

The show will open in Morristown on 
August IX, and tour the country to the 
Pacific coast. ■ 



BROWN TO FORSAKE FILMS 

Bothwell Brown, star of "Yankee 
Doodle in Berlin," with the Mack Bennett 
girls, at B. S. Moss" Broadway Theatre, is 
to re-enter the field of musical comedy in 
November, when his contract with Sennett 
terminates. ' He is now playing an in- 
definite engagement at the Ziegfeld The- 
atre, Chicago, and will be seen in "Mak- 
ing a Million," from the pens of Alonso 
Price and Stanley Lewton. Brown will, 
play a dual role in the piece, appearing 
first "as a male and then aa a -female char-' 
aeter. 



WANTS AN ANNULMENT 

Sak Fbancibco, Cal., Aug. 1L — Norbert' 
Maynard Gills, a local actor who baa been 
appearing with the Marjorie Bambeau 
company, is being sued for annulment of 
bis marriage by Gladys Cills. ' She claims 
that when they were married in New York, 
in .1007,, he had not been legally divorced 
from his first wife. She asked for the 
custody of the child, a boy, and $10 a week 
towards his support. 



HART SHOW OPENS MONDAY 

-Joseph Hart's new play, "Boys Will Be 
Boys," will open in Baltimore at Ford's"" 
Theatre next Monday. The' cast includes. 
Harry' Beresford, Carl Anthony,' Chas. Gib- 
ney, Win. St. James, Ervjlle Alderson, 
Robert Armstrong, George' Park, Charles 
Riegel, Frank Frayne, Claude Cooper, Har- 
old Bergh, Edjthe All en by. Florence 
Seville, Mabel Frenyear, Eugenie Du Boia 
and Ella Houghton. ' 



.... DIRECTS FRENCH SHOW 

- Pabih, France, Aug. 10. — George Smith- 
field, director of entertainments for the 
Y. M. C. A., and the K. c, staged an 
American musical comedy called "Getting 
Toulouse," which was played by students 
of the Toulouse University, with American 
soldiers as chorus girls 



TYLER RAPS LINGERIE PLAYS 

*■ . • .- ' ' '?-. -, - • • 

- AtUKUc" C*TTy~' 'Aug.' " 8.— George' O. 
Tyler,' the" producer, who was here putting 
one new play last week, expressed hia 
opinion of 'type of plays that have been in 

vogue for the last several seasons, his 
opinions being summed op in the following 
language: - .' ' ■ "-»lW»" r , 

"JKeyerbas.tbe State. Ja America, reached 
so low* level as it did last year. ". We're *V 
entering** better era forth* veryHmple ai 
reason that 'we couldn't get any worse. 
The bedroom and lingerie style of drama 
reached limits that far outstripped decency 
r-it was worse 'than a gambler's chance 
for a father to take hia daughter to a atow 
and alt there with any sense of ease. Ha 
never knew when a salacious speech or an 
unseemingly. situation would arise. The 
theatre became a place where it was prac- 
tically unsafe to take a young person. 
Themes, fit. only for a clinic, wen built 
into dramas— profanity waa put into the 
mouths of women — and alutationi so daring 
that decent-minded men and women made 
them taboo in. eon venation, were boldly ex- 
ploited on .the stage for any one to see who 
bad. the price of admission. Let any man 
or woman look back on the last five year* 
of the American drama and call to ■Jnd 
some of the speeches and situations sadly 
spoken and sadly shown, and then aueti 
Uon if I am right or wrong. . 

"But a revision in public tastes la tak- 
ing place. The theatre-goer Is sick and tired 
of the filth and the' suggest! veness. For 
it takes us nowhere and brings us nowhere. 
It's all very well to -talk of the passions 
and their dramatic values. They have 
their place in the world — they have their 
niche in the drama. Shakespeare showed 
it in 'Borneo and Juliet' — also In the scene 
of Desdemona'a bedroom in 'Othello.' But 
those scenes were mere episodes in a great 
big immortal unfolding of tragedy. Those 
isolated scenes did not make the entire play 
of 'Rraneo and Juliet' or of 'Othello.' 

''The clean play is coming Ito its own. 
again. We've wallowed long enough In the 
mud. The clear river, the green grass and 
the blue sky seem mighty fine after all. 
And it ia only by going away from them 
for awhile that it seems so good to get back 
to them again." • • 

ORIGINAL "MERRY WIDOW" FREE 
White Plains, N. Y., Aug. 9.— Mrs. 
Ethel J. Lockwood, known to theatregoers 
as the original "Merry Widow," and who 
was formerly the wife of J.. Fred Zimmer- 
man, Jr., has been granted a final decree of 
divorce from Bonnie Lockwood, a. New 
York business man. Mrs. Lockwood, known 
on the atage .aa.Bthel Jackson, sued for 
divorce early in the year.- giving aa co- 
respondent an actress whose name aha re- 
fused to divulge. 

'• •» — . : ,*.>.., . 

REMODEL ASHLAND HOUSE 

San Francisco, Aug. 9. — Over S200.00C 
will be spent to reconstruct the MacDoa- 
ougb. Theatre, in Oakland, for Ota Acker* 
man and Harris circuit Work baa. al- 
ready commenced and., practically a new. 
house will stand on the ground now ocqa 
pied by the present one. The bouse will 
have a capacity of two thousand on two 
floors, i 



SKINNER ENDS TOUR 

Faboo, N. D., Aug 7.— Otis Skinner 
closed his tour of "For the Honor of Hia' 
Family". here and dispersed his company, 
most of them going back to New York. Mr.: 
Skinner himself went to Bates Park, Colo- 
rado, where he' will rest for a month. 

PREPARING THREE •MAYTIME' CO.* 

.Three companies of "May time" are now 
being organUed to go out on the road the 
coming season. Eileen Van Biene, who 
appeared as Ottilbe last season, will -bead 
one of them. 



MEMPHIS ORPHEUM CLOSES 

Memphis, Augt 11. — The Orphean The- 
atre, here, has been dosed until August 23. 
During the rime it 1* shut, repairs irffl be 
made, and after the renovation It wBl again 
be run under the usual policy of vaudeville 
and pictures, with J. A. Bertram as man- 
ager. 



THE NEW YORK «H*IPP£R 



August 13, 1919 



TICKET BROKERS CHARGING 

SAME AS BEFORE ORDINANCE 

Price* for ToOiei" Seats Go as High as $40 Per Pair on 



-Saturdays and All Others Are Far Above 



fun 



That theatre ticket speculators are charg- 
ing aH aorta of exorbitant price* for theatre 
ticsTfcts and conducting their busines B in 
general along the lines that prevailed before 
the .Board of Aldermen passed the Kilroe- 
WilBams ordinance which regulates the ex- 
cess' J price which may be charged for 
tft*ets, was ascertained last week. An in- 
vestigation disclosed that not only ere many 
of the licensed agencies along Broadway 
getting from $1 to $15 in . excess of the 
fifty- cents which the law permits them to 
charge, but that, for the most part, they 
are selling- tickets for established successes 
for at least 75 cents, exclusive of the war 
tax, above the box office price stamped on 
»»» ticket. :■ 

1. tn those brokers, who deposited $10,000 
bonds with Flo Ziegfeld as an -earnest that 
they WOOld not sell "Follies" tickets for 
more than fifty cents above the box office 



rfriee are receiving far in excess of that 
amount. 

Especially is this true of one broker who, 
since the "Foffies" opened at the New 
Amsterdam, has sold no tickets for orchestra 
seats for (ess than $7 each. And on Satur- 
day nights, he has been receiving as high 
as $40 a pair for tickets. to the Ziegfeld 
show. 

Although ' it is announced from time to' 
time that the District Attorney's office will 
begin a. series of raids on the recalcitrant 
brokers in an effort to curb the "ticket 
speculating evil," apparently these efforts 
are confined strictly - to announcements. 
And whatever sporadic attempts have. been 
made by';the. police and the' District At- 
torney's office to cope, with -the situation 
have resulted in nothing more than to cause 
the brokers to ply their trade a little more 
secretly.. 



"CIVILIAN CLOTHES" WILL WIN 
Atlantic Cut, N. J-, Aug. II.— Were 
one to make a chart of all the shows seen 
here in a given time, for instance like the 
seismograph, which registers volcanic .ac- 
tivity, the agitation produced by "Civilian 
Clothes" would appear .as a well, defined 
vacillation of line. Not that it is a vol- 
cano, by any means, but last night, at its 
first appearance at the Apollo Theatre, it 
did record a distinct impression. 

To carry out the idea, ' some careful 
pruning and tinkering will enable it to 
tattle the needle of. the theatrical seis- 
mograph, considerably more. 

There are vagaries in the action which 
no well ordered and orthodox critic can 
overlook, as, for instance, the introduction 
of a wholly unnecessary character for no 
reason at all and the absurd assumption 
of bigamy in the first scene of the third 
act. These, together with not a few lines 
whose erassneas, for! all their adroitness, 
Is a little distasteful, might well be ex- 
purgated, with no loss to the wit of the 
scene and with considerable benefit to it. 
The story is one of those fictions which 
never really happen, but which might hap- 
pen, and, no doubt, with the same result 
as that managed in the play. Briefly, a 
refined girl has married an army captain 
in France, -and when she sees him in ci- 
vilian clothes, she decides that .she has 
made an awful mistake. He tells her she 
is a snob, and proves it by assuming the 
position of butler in her father's house. 
She learns her lesson, and in a particularly - 
tantalizing bedroom scene returns to - him 
as an obedient and — er — expectant wife. 

For the most part, it is rather well 
Written, though Thompson Buchanan did 
not get into high gear until the b e g innin g 
of the second act, which was by far the 
best in action and the wittiest in line. . 
There are, too, a number of scenes which 
strike one as being pushed along from 
behind by unseen hands. They do not 
move spontaneously, as well constructed 
scenes should. 

Nevertheless, "Civilian Clothes" strikes 
a refreshing note in the diapason of the 
theatrical scale and is very amusing. 
With careful adjustment it should bid 
strongly for favor. 

Thurston Hall, who created the part in 
Los Angeles, came east to portray Captain 
Sam McGinnia, A. E. F., and he does it 
admirably. Olive Tell, late of "General 
Post," plays the high bred wife, and Frank 
Sylvester her father. Edwin Holden pre- 
sented one of his sketchy' and delightful 
character pictures, and Marian Vantine 
showed one how very, very- frank a widow 
sometimes can be. Isabel Irving made a 
perfect society mother, whose happiness 
depended, entirely upon a faultless butler. 
Mr. Morosco, no doubt, will spend some 
of his expert knowledge upon the piece 
before' it reaches New York. 



CENTURY EMPLOYEES HELD UP 

Two men and a woman, -employees of 
Beisenweber's, on the Century Koof, were 
held up by three- men -and; robbed; of 
$551.75 early last Wednesday morning 
near the Century Theatre at Siity-second 
street near- Broadway. The robbers made, 
their escape in an automobile which stood 
waiting for them near by. 

The people robbed are: May Haram, 
cashier in -the Century Grove restaurant, 
which is conducted by Beisenweber's; 
Adolph Krell. the steward, and -A. Mar- 
ronorian, the latter of. whom was carry- 
ing the money which was the evening's 
restaurant receipts. " 

They told the police that the men who 
held them up. formed a circle about them 
and commanded them to hold up their 
hands and hand over the money they were 
carrying.- This occurred shortly after 2 
a. m., when they were on their way to 
Beisenweber's restaurant below Columbus 
Circle to deposit the receipts, in accord- 
ance with their daily habit. 

Had they been robbed, a day earlier the 
robbers would have got receipts obtaining 
$1,400. Before the advent of prohibition 
it was stated that the restaurant receipts 
on the Century Roof used to average tap- 
wards of $2,000 nightly. 



"UNKNOWN PURPLE" OPENS SETT. 1 

"The Unknown Purple" will re-open on 
Labor Day, when it will start its season 
in New Haven. From there it is scheduled 
for indefinite runs in Boston and Phila- 
delphia and later will be sent on tour. 

George Probert has been engaged by 
Roland West for the role of V. Crdmport. 
Rehearsals have already been started un : 
der the direction of Charles H. Smith; > who 
staged the -piece last season. -\-<:' : 

Others who- will appear in the cast are 
Jean Stuart, Joseph Slay tor, Vivian Allen, 
Arthur LeVier, Grant Sherman, Herbert 
Ash ton, Henry Redding, E. L. Duane, and 
Benjamin McQuarrie. ■ " - 



STEWART AND MORRISON ACTIVE 

Stewart and Morrison have in prepara- 
tion a new musical play by Harry B. 
Smith and Hugo Reisenfeld, .which they 
will produce with two well known stars 
in the lead.- Later on they will present 
Pauline Lord in a new play especially 
written for her, and will send out a road 
company of "Our Pleasant Sins." 



SHUBERTS WANT PARIS HOUSE 

Pasts, Aug. 8.— A. Toxen Worm is here 
trying to select a theatre for the presenta- 
tion of American plays by the Shuberts. 
Three houses have been offered, but no 
choice will be made until he returns to the 
United States. 



BELASCO OPENS NEW PIECE 

Toborto, Ont, Aug. -LL^-The Whole 
Art. of Man Catching" " might have been 
tie title -of 'the excellent three-act comedy 
by Jean Ar ch ib ald, which was given. its 
premiere last night at the Royal Alexan- 
dria' by the Robins Players, assisted by 
Maude Fealy and Madeline Delmar, 
through arrangement with David Belasco. 
There is such an abundance of good things 
Sn the piece thsiWt is ungracious as well 
as trite to say that it might be' somewhat 
condensed.. .:"' ' - v ' 

, There are three episodes which made 
contrast for the main idea of the plot, 
but are not really concerned in the Btorg. 
Nor do they advance it in any way. They 
add to the brightness and variety of the 
performance, but they are not indispensa- 
ble -in the sense of being close knit into 
the'web of the story; ■ ' = 

The most important of these incidental 
passages -is the Hungarian painter, played 
with delightful temperamental effect' by 
Miss Delmar. One .would not willingly 
miss a moment of this most nmnaing and 
strikingly -clever performance- But the 
question arises, what had she to do with 
the plot? ' \ :'-:■- ;v<-;-:.^-:' 

A second episode was the love affair of 
Nellie, Mrs. Mowbray's' maid, carried on 
by telephone. This -was well done by 
Mary Emmereon, but it had nothing to do 
with -the story, except, aa before, In pre- 
senting a contrasting moral. 

Jack Amory, made up as a local M. P„ 
was another episodic character. Eddie 
Thomas afforded" a good deal of amuse- 
ment both directly 'and indirectly .through 
his wife, Isa belle Thomas; but contributed 
nothing to the plot.. Mrs. Thomas, very 
-brightly played by Jane Marbury, has a 
legitimate place in the unfolding of the 
story, and some of the best lines in the 
piece are- assigned to her. 

The ; story itself- sets ont the -troubles 
of a wife tea years married, whose hus- 
band is consoling himself with visits to 
New'.. York and- the friendship of a typical 
home wrecker'. : Belle Murray takes this 
part, but she has not much material to 
work on. Mrs. Mowbray, the neglected 
and too' attentive wife, is -remarkably well 
done by. Reina Carruthers, who has im- 
proved in *very way. 

Mrs. Mowbray calls in a specialist in 
domestic affliction, and introduces her as 
a doctor, an error. -that : is. the foundation 
of most. of the humor and the ingenious 
' climax of the first; act. The scenes in 
which she takes her profession seriously 
are exceedingly good, the diagnosis for 
example of the domestic conditions in the 
Mowbray home and the three cornered 
scene in the third act, where she faces 
Mr, Mowbray and the lawyer, and the 
dramatic climax to the second act, where 
she tells Dudley Townsend that she is go- 
ing to fight him and can tell him right 
then who'll win." : . c- -~ ' . 

, ■ Mowbray, the love weary husband, is 
taken by Robert E. Homans, whose ster- 
ling acting finds a good, opportunity in 
the third act Joan Deering, the doctor, 
is played by Maude Fealy' and she gave 
it vitality and spirit.'.- 
. There hasn't been. seen such a love scene 
fori years as her_ surrender to Townsend 
in the second act, followed so swiftly by... 
an absolute- revulsion, - Miss Fealy has a 
fine voice and she used it with effect. The 
creation of, the . part - is - thoroughly good 
work, centralizing, pivotal and construc- 
tive, yet never /losing touch with the hu- 
morous aim of the play. A. ROmaine Cal- 
lander had one of the extraneous parts, 
and Vivian Laidlaw took a' necessary 
share in the third act. The piece was well 
staged and the costuming attractive. - 

TRANSLATING BERNSTEIN PLAYS 
Pakis, Aug.- lL-HV'irginia Fox Brooks is 
here busily engaged on an American ver- 
sion of "Lystrate," Henry Bernstein's 
play. - The ' Shuberts have signed with 
Bernstein for, the exclusive American 
rights' to all his plays.;..' 

SCmnJA HAS NEW ONE 
: A new show which the Scibilia enter- 
prises wiQ present is "My Once in a 
While." It is from the pen of Charles 
George, who wrote "50-50" and "O* 
Dickey/* : 



. H. -Woods, 



opens 



,; DATES AHEAD 

••A Pearl of Great Price"'— A. 

Stamford, Conn., Aug. 12.- • • 
"Baddies" — Selwyn and Company, 
. Boston. Aug.' 12. 
"A Regular Fellow" — Chas. Emerson Cook, 

opens Cort Theatre, Aug. 13. 
'Those Who Walk In Darkness" — Shuberts, 

opens 48th Street Theatre, Aug. 14. 
»Hiteby-Koo" — Raymond Hitchcock, opens 

Atlantic City. Aug. 18. 
"Adam and Bra" — Comstock and Gest, opens - , 

Longacre, "N.. X., !a.nE 18- ' . ' l| 

"An Innfdlat.'Mecif— »Vfe M - Emeraoi .Cook. " ' 

• opens Afbarr Tart. ArE 18. ** ■* 
"Boy a Win Be Boys"— Joe Bart, opens,. 

.Baltimore, Aug. 18. .;' 

"7 Miles to Arden" — Morosco, opens Grand ' 

Baplda, Mich., Aug. 2L 
"Look Who's Here'' — Max Spiegel, 

Washington, Aug. 24. 
"Mme. Sappho"— Oliver Morosco, < opens- 

• Olympic Theatre, Chicago, Aug. 24. . . 
"The Bashful Hero" — A. H. Woods, opens 

Bijou Theatre. Aug. 25. '• ' .■ - 

"First Is Last' 1 — Wm. Harris, opens Mar- 
ine Elliott Theatre, Aug. 25. 
"Little Love Birds'* — A. H. Woods, opens 



Atlantic City, Aug. 25, 
Idear* — F. 



"What's the 



25. 



V. Peterson, opens 



Schenectady, Aug. _ 
'Just a Minate" — John Cort, opens Atlantic 



opens Stam- 



Cfeera 



City, Aug. 26. 
"Lady Tony" — A H. Woods, 

ford. Conn., Ang. 29. 
Strand, Brooklyn, opens Aug. 80. 
Barney Fagan Benefit — Manhattan 

House, Aug. 31. 
"Fifty-Fifty"— Sclbllla Theatrical Co., opens 
' Washington, Ang. 31. 
"The GirLIn the Limousine" — A H. Woods, 

Haddock, opens 

Frasee, opens 



openg Eltlnge Theatre, Sept. 1. 
"Nothing Bnt Love" — Chas. 

Buffalo. Sept 1. 
"My Lady Friends" — H. 



ittabufgh. Labor Day. 
Friar's. Special Meeting— Sept 5. 
"The Girl in the Stage Box"'— A H. Woods, 
opens Washington, Sept, 7. ■."'-, 

• Devil"— Joe Weber, opens 



Detroit, Sept 7. 
r"r-6elwyn 
Sept 



Company, opens 

H. Woods, 



'The Little Blue 



"Mommex" — Selwyn and 

Aabury Park, . Sept 8. 
"The Great Illusion" — A. 
• Booth Theatre, Sept 8. 
"Holy Poly Eyes" — John Cort opens Balti- 
more, Sept 8. '■ •. 
"The Little Whooper" — Abe Levy,, opens 
' Atlantic City, Sept 13. 
Robert Mantel! opens in "Julius Caesar*' at 

the Hontaok, Brooklyn. . ■ ■ 

"Seven Miles to Arden"-rOUver Morosco', 

opens Little Theatre, Oet-L 
Sothern and Marlowe opens In "Twelfth 

Night" at 44th Street Theatre, Oct 5. 
"The Luck of the Navy"— Comstock add 

Gest, opens Manhattan Opera House, 

Oct 6. 
"The Unknown Woman" — A H. Woods, 

opens Washington, Oct 8. 
Society ot American Singers, William Wade 

Hinshaw, opens ParkTheatre, Oct 18. '- 
t Oct < 20 erB ' °°'' op * n8 1 * xln f* t on Theatre 
Provineetown Players, open October M. 
"Aphrodite" — Comstock and Gest opens 
^Century Theatre, Nov. L ■ 

Chicago Opera. Company, opens Chicago, 

Nov. 18. .. ■"-' 

SHE DOESN'T -"BREAKFAST IN BED" 

Atlantic CrxT, N. J, Aug. 11. — Flor- 
ence Moore started an engagement at the 
Globe Theatre here when Al Woods pre- 
sented "Breakfast in Bed" for the first 
time, a new farce by Georges Feydeau, 
Americanized by Wniard Mack and Bil- 
liard Booth. •■■ '*V ' 

Strange to relate, there was no break- 
fast in bed, so that the source of the title 
still remains undefined. However, where 
laughs are concerned, there is little use m 
searching for the birth certificate of the 
name, and there are plenty of good, sound 
laughs in "Breakfast in Bed." 

To Florence Moore's well known predi- 
lection for action, the major portion of 
the fun was due. She has the farceur's 
skill in amputating all rationality from 
her actions. She brought a laugh many 
times purely .from lack or a deliberate 
avoidance of grace, and they were very 
healthy laughs! '■':■". 

As to the story, "Breakfast in Bed" is 
the usual risque tale of intoxicants and 
innocent mistakes. Two girls becoming, 
as the saying is, "all lit up," spend the 
night- in a young man's room, much to 
their own. horror and the young man's 
discomfort. /From there on there is 
nothing new to the fable. A father wants 
his daughter married, and a rich uncle in- 
sists on his nephew becoming a benedict 
But this tangle, old as it is, is a tried 
fountain of funny situations and snappy 
lines, with which this new farce abounds. 
After a week under Wood's eye, it will 
no doubt be s> finished thing, -which -will 
bid high for Broadway favor. 

In the cast were Harry Hanlon, Will 
Deming, Vincent Dennis, Tommy Meade, 
Helen Cnnningham, Gladys Gilbert, Leon 
Gorton, C. Hooper Trash, Fred Strong, 
Jules EpilJy, and others." 



August 13, 1919 



AUJi 



THE^NEW Y6*K CLI^PElt 




JULIAN ELTINGE 

ANNOUNCES 

WORLD TOUR 

WILL CARRY FULL REVUE 



Los A.ngixes, Aug. 9. — It has been an- 
nounced here that Julian. Eltinge, who haa 
for many seasons headlined. in all of the 
best vaudeville houses the country over, and' 
who is credited with being the world's 
premiere female impersonator, Is to mate 
a tour of the world with a selected com- 
pany of specialty artists. 

Eltinge, who has long desired to appear 
on the continent and who has received many 
offers to appear in London and Paris, had 
planned just such a tour when the. war 
broke, oat. Now, however, he feels free to 
continue with his scheme and it is an- 
nounced that he will start from here as 
soon as he can arrange the necessary de- 
tails. 
. In many of the far Eastern countries 
which Eltinge plans to tour, feminine im- 
persconation has long been a traditional 
part of the theatre, and, consequently, much 
in demand. He feels that he will be jus- 
tified by the results of his appearances in 
these countries, in risking the tour, and 
plans to appear in Great Britain, France, 
Australia, Japan, China, "and perhaps even 
Turkey. 

The Eltinge show, at present, includes 
Leo Beers, the Gaudsmith brothers, Cleo 
Gascoigne, Virginia Whitman, Marjorie 
Carville Gorhada, Marione, Radium girls, 
the Littlejohns, Ford and' Price, Marjorie 
Bennett, Arthur Shirley and Kathleen 
Dewey. 

BILLY REEVES MARRIES 
William Reeves Sheridan (Billy; Reeves), 
of Skipper, Kennedy and Reeves, was mar- 
ried Wednesday, Aug. 6, id Miss Evelyn 
Transfield, of the Transfield Sisters, a 
well-known sister act. The ceremony was 
performed by the Rev. Father A. Savary 
at the Church of the Ascension in Oak 

Park, HL ':-, •"'.-"■.„ , - 

Reeves was attended by Herbert Stoke- 
ly, a non-professional, of Des Moines, la., 
and the bride's attendants were Miss 
Florence Transfield, Bister, and Miss Inez 
Bellaires, of 'Four Jacks and a Queen." 
The wedding feast was served at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Raff en in 
Oak Park, father . and mother of Miss 
Bellaires. 

After a' short honeymoon Mrs. Sheridan 
will rejoin her sister for a vaudeville tour. 
Reeves will rejoin his former stage mates 
and again appear in the variety theatres. - 



HAMMOND GETS NEW HOUSES 

Hammond, Ind., is to have two new 
vaudeville theatres this year. One will 
be erected on South Homan street, with 
a Beating capacity of 3,000, and the other 
will be built on the same street and have 
the same amount of seats. Efforts to as- 
certain, those in back of the ventures 
proved futile. It is said that Hammond 
next season will be a hotbed for op- 
position. The Western •, Vaudeville' Man- 
agers' Association is reported as being 
back of one of the contemplated theatres, 
and possibly George H. Webster will fig- 
ure in the other. 



PAULINE FEATURED Df FILM 

J. Robert Pauline, well known as a 
hypnotist in vaudeville, is to be featured 
in a fifteen-episode serial, given the tem- 
porary title of "Brewster's Mysterious 
Millions." The production is under way 
at the studio* of the Supreme Pictures, at 
Flashing, Long Island. 



*■ •'• new acts, c :,. , .;; 

' Jack Neville, formerly: of HaUiday and 
Neville, jwill appear with,. Frank Brock in 
a new offering. The act, written by Frank- 
Kennedy, -will have special scenery- and 
Will be handled by Harry Fitzgerald. 

Beth Stone and -Harry Axmonde opened 
last week on Proctor time, booked by Sol 
TJnger, of the Strand Building. 

The Jan Maniacs, assisted by Billy 
Rogers, jass. violinist, and with Edith Dow- 
non and Lucille Boris as principals, will 
open this week at Keeney's, Brooklyn. The 
act, in addition to those mentioned, has a 
five piece orchestra and is booked by Nat 
Nazxaro. 

William Branddl has a new girl act 
ready for production called Oh Something, 
which' will have a cast of twelve people, 
four principals and a chorus of eight. Jack 
Glair, Victor Kahn and Blanche Boone 
have' been engaged for it thus far. 

Simpletown is the title of a new act 
which Arthur Lyons put into rehearsal 
yesterday: . 

; Marion and Billy have a singing act in 
rehearsal which will be handled by Arthur 
Lyons. - ( . 

- Arthur Lyons has a new act entitled 
"The Rose Onion" in reheasal. Van Avery 
wrote it. The cast includes John'Wood- 
ford, George Wallace and Polly Grey," 

The Garden of Love is the title of a 
new act which B. Lohjnuller will present 
shortly.. It is to have a cast of seven, 
three principals and a chorus of four. 

Jose Collini, formerly in the act of 
Dorian and Collini, is planing ' a ' new 
act with Rosita Toragrosa, the Spanish 
comedienne. 

- Secret Service, with a cast of ten and 
written by Joseph L. Browning, is a 
new act which Herman Becker has in 
preparation. " .... 

. LEAVING PANTAGES HOUSE 

Spokane, Wash., Aug. 9.— K. W. De- 
Lion, who for the last twelve years has 
been assistant manager of the Pantagee 
Theatre, is resigning that position to de- 
vote bis time exclusively to the advertising 
business. He began in this twelve years 
ago when he started to publish the pro- 
grams for several theatres in this city and 
to handle their curtain advertising. His 
success has been so great that he is to open 
offices under the name of "The DeLaon Ad- 
vertising Company." No one wiU.be named 
to succeed him. 

HART REVIVING OLD TRIO ACT 

The old act of Keno Lloyd and Davis, 
known as "Ain't We Nutty I" is being re- 
vived under the direction of Max Hart. 
The act has toured the London Music 
Halls and appeared in Paris. 

A new young lady will appear in the 
part formerly 'played by Miss David and 
another young man will replace Tom 
Keno, who has 'left the act. These two, 
with Frank Lloyd, are now rehearsing the 
turn, which they expect to open on the 
two-a-day soon. 

LEICHTER HAS .ROAD SHOW 

Al. Leichter, of the Putnam Building, 
will soon go up-State with a vaudeville 
road show of fourteen people. He will 
also arrange for the presentation of musi- 
cal tabloids in various theatres. At pres- 
ent he ■ is organizing the "Juvenile - Fol- 
lies," featuring twenty juveniles. The act 
wlil contain . special numbers, and win 
have, a set of scenery around it. It opens 
in New England the latter part of this 



N. V. A. SHOWS OFF TROPHY 

. The B. F. Albee Trophy Cup which was 
presented to the National Vaudeville 
Artists for winning a baseball victory over 
the Friars' Club - cm July 29th, at the 
Flair's Club Outing, is now on exhibition 
at the N. VI A. club rooms. The trophy 
is a simple but handsome silver cup bearing 
a neat inscription from the donor. 



VAUDE. SEASON 

STARTS HERE 

SEPT. 1 

ORPHEUM HOUSES OPEN EARLIER 



Big time vaudeville in New York City 
will be in full swing again on September 
1st which is the date' set for the opening 
of the Colonial and Alhambra Theatres 
which have been dosed during the summer 
months..' 

The theatres are undergoing but tew re- 
pairs and there are no important changes 
in. the personnel of the house staffs' or 
musicians. ''•*' it 

The" shows scheduled for the openings 
have not, as yet, been announced. 

The Orphenm Circuit started its new 
season on August 4th at 'Winnipeg with 
Bessie Clayton headlining the bill. This 
same show opens the Grand at Calgary, the 
Royal at Victoria, the Orphenm at Van- 
couver, the Moore at Seattle and the Hefttg 
at' Portland, on August 11th, August 15th, 
August 18th, August 24th and August 31st 
respectively. 

The United States Jass Band leads the 
acta that open the Omaha Orphenm on 
August 17th. Mrs. Gene Hughes and 
Company, and Stone and Kalis share head- 
line honors on the opening bin at Minne- 
apolis, while "Not Yet Marie" tops the 
opening program at St;. Paul on August 
17th. "The Orphenm at Kansas City opens 
on August 24th with Oiccoline and Blossom 
Seeley and her . Boys as co-headliners- 
Albertina Rasch and Ballet open the 
Orphenm at Des Moines on August 17th. 
Carl Jorn and Madame Ellis win shase 
first honors on the opening bill at Duluth 
on the same date. 

The Morgan Dancers will open Salt 
Lake, Denver, and Lincoln on August 6th, 
August 12th and August 17th respectively. 

The Palace Theatre, Chicago, win have 
the ' Spanish Dancers as its headline at- 
traction when it opens on September l«t, 
and Stella Mayhew tops the bffl at the St. 
Louis Orphenm which opens on the same 
date. The opening bills for Milwaukee, 
Memphis, New Orleans, Sacramento, Stock- 
ton and. Fresno have not as yet been de- 
termined. San Francisco, Los Angeles and' 
the Chicago Majestic did not dose this 
summer. 



SAUBER HAS NEW ACT 

- Harry Sauber has in preparation a- num- 
ber of new acts; .which will soon open, fat 
addition to those of last season. Among 
them are: "All for Love," a. musical farce, 
featuring Max Furman and three others. 
"The New Model" will re-open on. Sept. 
22, with AL Weber again featured. "The 
League of Nations" wffl start another 
season on Sept. 8 with Claude West star- 
ring. 

"The Premium Girls" is the title of a 
new girl act with the scene laid in tbe 
United Cigar Store premium station. 

"Give Us a Kiss,", a musical farce with 
Lew Sharps and Marie Bergman, is being 
prepared, and "Fat" Morse- and two girls 
wUl be seen in another farce with music 
called "The New Butler." 



THORNS AND BRENNAN TEAM UP 
After playing together on the N. V. A. 
baseball team, Eddie Tborne and Eddie 
Brennan have decided to try playing to- 
gether on Keith time, and are opening 
next week at Pater-son, N. J., in a now act. 
Brennan. previously appeared with a trio, 
while Thome : was a member of "The 
Singing Firemen" company. 



N. V. A* BALL SEASON ENDS 
jBaj ebal) actrtjtfes at the N. V. A. came 
to a suOTen 'end this week when some 
of "the players on the club's team were 
forced to lay aside their spiked shoes and 
bats to go to work again. The starting 
of the new vaudeville season has so great* 
ly hampered' the team that it is unlikely 
that any more games will be scheduled 
for this season.' The club will thus rest 
content on its present record, which lit 
games won, eight; games lost, four. 

The victories include' three games 
against the Lights, two - against Edge- 
wood and single victories against the Van 
and Scbenckteem, the Friars and the J. 
P. Morgan nine. The latter team, which 
heads the Bankers' League, was trimmed 
by the actors with a score of 25 to 2. 
The vaudeville nine, suffered defeats at the 
hands of the Lights, the Loewitee, Uni- 
versal and Winona during the season. 

A baseball . team without a pitcher Is 
like beer minus the kick, and Buddy Shtp- 
ard, who pitched the N. V. A. to a num- 
ber of victories, is opening for the new 
beason next, week.' Others who must quit 
the diamond on the. theory that business 
comes, before pleasure, I are Joe Brown, 
third baseman; Eddie Brennan, first base- 
man, 'and Tommy Harvey, who held tha 
position behind the bat. 



LOEW -MANAGER Of COURT 

Albert Gutterman, manager of Loew*s 
Delancey Street Theatre, appeared, in 
Essex Market Court on Sunday «g*^«*Tt' 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Perlmutter, of 1412 
Madison avenue, who, be .claimed, were rais- 
ing a disturbance and making nuisances of 
themselves during a performance. 

Gutterman claimed that the Periraat- 
ters bad paid for two seats, but, together, 
occupied one. 'He said that his attention 
was drawn to them at first by their load 
laughter at the wrong time. He sent an 
usher to them to quiet them. A little while 
later, the laughter was repeated. This 
time Gutterman went down the aisle him* 
self and found Mrs. Perlmutter comfort- 
ably reposing in her husband's lap, which 
position, according to Gutterman, was 
against the fire department regulations. 



KEITHS LEASE CLEVELAND SITE 
Cixvsxajjd. Aug. 9. — Tbe announcement 
was made this week that Keith, interests 
and others in the East have acquired tha 
lease of the Prospect Theatre here, and the 
Metropole Cafe, adjoining, making, tha new 
Keith Theatre aa assured face. 

It la proposed to construct a theatre on 
the property and a twelve-story office band- 
ing, with five stories over the theatre audi- 
torium. 



COLORED DANCERS STOPPED 

San Fbancisco, CaL, Aug. 9. — A troupe 
of eight colored shimmie dancers, which 
opened at the Strand last week, was forced 
to close because of police interference. The 
cops ordered the management to cancel tbe 
act, and it was replaced with a refined 
dancing specialty, i 

.^-™ ~- , 

COAST DISCOVERS NEW DANCE 
San Frakcxsoo, CaL, Aug. 0. — There is 
a new dance coming into vogue here which 
promises to eclipse the "shimmey" in point 
of popularity^ It la called "The San Fran- 
cisco Shiver." 



CHINESE JAZZ RAND OPENS 

Bar Fhahcibco. CaL. Aug. 11.— A local 
Jus Band, composed of Chinese musicians, 
which has been appearing at the Orphenm 
under the direction of Thomas B. Kennedy, 
has made a hit, and wffl be booked over the 
Orphenm Circuit, 

-■ GET KEITH TIME ROUTE 

Daley and Berlew have bean given a 
route of forty weeks on the Keith time. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13, lgJ9 




The VnU hadVn~Cilerns33onsT'nnToF~»rtth " 
a Jap act opening, an Italian tenor, a 
French singer, an American quartette, a 
Hebrew comedian and a varied array of 
national talent. ' Each of the nine acta 
that appeared offered singing; in fact the 
bill appeared to be a song.contesi, and on 
more than one occasion the sum song was 
heard twice. Jimmy Hussey and Com- 
pany headlined and carried away the hon- 
ors. 

Four Mayakos interested all with an ex- 
cellent offering that contained eqnilibriam, 
contortion, music and .a song and dance. 
The three youthful members carry the box- 
den and everything attempted met with 
much applause. The rostrum en tal string 
numbers were well delivered and the flirta- 
tion aong and dance aeat them off to a big 
hand. 

The Primrose Four evidently bare been 
away from these parts for a Ions time aa 
all their numbers are of the 1918 vintage. 
However, the boys almost stopped the 
show, dne to their rendition, with some 
good comedy thrown in. Van, Cant well, 
Murphy and Gibner make np the quartette 
and their solo and ensemble numbers drew 
heavy applause. 

Ernest Evans and his associates have an . 
act that ia in .need of. rearrangement, as, . 
at one time, after Evans dancer! with Ora 
Deane, he went to the piano 'and, entirely 
out of breath, tried to put over a lyric. 
This should be eliminated. Miss Deane ia 
an excellent dancer bj d is pretty to look 
-upon. She also has the right idea of 
rhythmetic steping. iistelle McNeal, Ger- 
trude Zobel and Mildred Rife mora than as- 
sisted and the success the act obtained was 
due more to their efforts than. the. work of 
Evans, who has the goods but does not pnt 
the act over rightly to get the. proper re- 
snltB. '*• 

Montgomery and Allen went wen toward 
the finish. The act opens with Montgom- 
ery doing comedy with a cane and hat that 
fall from the piano. This did not get 
much. It appeared as if his comedy waa 
forced, especially the old "gag" about puH- 
ing the piano around so the people in the 
boxes could see him. Miss Allen is a per- 
former of the old school, and the last num- 
ber, "A Vampire," with Montgomery leap- 
ing into her arms, went well. 
' Cloeolini, a tenor with " a grand opera 
voice, enraptured his Hate Hers with a weU- 
arranged ' number of classical and popular 
songs. The prison aria from' "Tosca," 
Massenet 'a "Elegie," "Until," "Dear Old 
Pal of Mine,", and "I'll Come' to Ton," tie 
last three in English" and -the 'Steers in 
Italian, were rendered masterfully and re- 
sulted in a sensarioniPhit. '" ;. 

Jnssey. with his new. act, made 
first, -galacs; appearance,' and if the 
Monday afternoon audience is,; any cri- 
terion, he and tas associates can' remain at 
the house indefinitely. In a. curtain speech 
Hussey gave credit, to Tot' Qualters, who, 
'he explained, had only been with the act 
a few days, and it was remarkable how 
well she read her lines and pnt over "The 
Shimmey." Miss Qualtera proved beyond 
doubt that she is an artist and that danc- 
ing is not her only accomplishment. ' Hus- 
aey also has Wm. Worsely, who sings well, 
and a jan . band consisting of cope and 
prisoners, who furnish the music to his 
songs. To say that the comedian was a 
tt»MtiMi would be patting it mildly. The 
act ia a travesty on the "Police Question," 
and i»»"»««"« many bright lines and situ- 
ations, excellently handled by Hussey and 
Miss Qualters. A jury of old men could 
be dispensed with aa their appearance did 
not brighten up the act.. The act ia a 
corker and would undoubtedly draw busi- 
ness anywhere. -"■''. 

Mile. Nitta-Jo sang in French and Eng- 
lish. She held down the spot with credit. 

Four Marks Bros, and Company, featur- 
ing "Harpo" Marks, held them in almost 
to a man, ' and their comedy and music waa 
applauded to the echo. J. D. 



REVIEWS 



'! at M 



(Caotizuwd 



« 



Jlmmy„ rt 
liia ' 



RIVERSIDE 

OrvOle Stamm, late Phyiicial Instructor 
of the U. S. Navy, opened the show. 
Stamm ia versatile, he sings, plays the 
violin,. does, a number of feats of strength 
and perform* a number of exercise bits 
calculated to reduce flesh. The act is en- 
tertaining from start to finish, and Stamm 
finished with good-sized hit to his credit. 

Laxir and Dale, two black-face come- 
dians and musicians, worked valiantly in 
the second 'spot. Their talk and stories are 
the weak portion ol the act, and the greater 
part of it should be rewritten or elimi- 
nated entirely. The musical portion, violin 
and piano playing, started interest in the 
offering which was sustained until the fin- 
ish. 

Jack Kennedy and Co., in "A Golf Pro- 
posal." did wen .with a little comedy play- 
let which depends more upon Kennedy's 
ability' as a comedian to get over rather 
than the lines or situations. The story is 
simple and deals with hashfnl old Judge, 
an inveterate golf player, who has. been 
trying for years to get np courage to pro- 
pose to an attractive widow, whose young 
daughter has just married. The marriage 
is displeasing to the widow, who tells the 
bridegroom that she is going to get the 
Judge to annul the marriage as the girl is 
but seventeen. ' The boy gets to the Judge 
first and after telling him bow be can suc- 
cessfully propose to his mother-in-law; gets 
a promise that he wUl never allow any- 
one to separate him from his young bride. 
The Judge with much difficulty wins -the 
widow and an ends happily. Kennedy does 
some excellent work in the sketch, and his 
supporting company is. good. 

•Clifton Crawford has gone back to bis 
old act again, and with the collection of 
sure-fire songs and stories scored one of 
the show's big hits. The gold-fish story, 
the song of the inebriate who tells of the 
morning after the night before, the stut- 
tering bit, and the Kipling recitation an 
. received their usual quota of laughter and 
applause.' '■' ..'.-. 

-■• Pearl Regay and. Lester Sheean closed 
the first' part with 'their songs and dances. 
Miss Regay, as usual,' did the lion's share 
of the act and received The • big applause 
portion. , . ,-' , 

i After topics of the day, Craig Campbell, 
the tenor' late of the Opera Comique, ren- 
dered' a collection of operatic and popular 
selections. Campbell was. not in good voice, 
bis tones , especially in the upper- register 
seemed duU and. weak, win! e' those. of the 
•lower, and middle were -covered^ Of ..-the 
popular. numbers "Madel«ta" was song the 
best,' while if'Vesti la giatrtia" 'torn "Pagli- 
acci" "for his 'flwipniiig selection ranked first 
among the operatic selections. Hector Mc- 
Carthy played,- his accompaniments and also 
rendered a pleasing piano solo number. 
Campbell has peculiar ideas' in regard .to 
the dressing of his act, and these do. not 
help it any. He is attired in summer cos- 
tume with dark coat, white trousers and 
shoes, while his accompanist appeared in 
full dress. . The mid-summer season per- 
mits a style of dress not permissabl., in 
winter, but Campbell and his accompanist 
should at least be consistent.. 

Ames and Wiathrop are showing: their 
old act, "Caught in a Jamb," which re- 
fers to the opening of their offering when 
Miss Winthrop's dress- is embarrassingly 
caught in the door.. There are. a number 
of laughs in this portion of the act. The 
balance of the act is good, the d s nrin g be- 
ing particularly fine. 

Lillian Fitzgerald closed the show and 
did excellently with some well-put-over 
songs and imitations. In the difficult clos- 
ing position Miss Fitzgerald scored a bit 
of decided proportions. W. V. 



ROYAL 

Alfred Farrell and Company, the latter 
word designating a girl who assisted in the 
work, led off with an offering- that con- 
sisted of picture making, the materials em- 
ployed being pieces of rag. - There; were 
two deviations from the general order of 
things, one being a bit of caricature work 
by the man, Arabic figures being used in 
the drawings, and a crayon drawing, by 
him. The girl did a considerable part of 
the work, just as much aa her partner, in 
fact, and deserves to have her name men- 
tioned' in the billing. ",. . 

Joseph McCormack and Harry Mellon 
sang a bit and also did some talking, but 
the-. feature of the torn was the dancing. 
The boys were well liked and their step- 
ping elicited a hearty round of applause. 

They will be further reviewed in the New 

Act- department. 

The Araant Brothers have a clown act 
which consists mainly of old bits which 
clowns nave been using for many years. 
While much of their material is quite old, 
the audience received everything they did 
with applause and laughter. 

The Creole Fashion Plate is a young 
man. who works in woman's clothes and 
uses feminine make-up. So perfect is his 
falsetto' that audiences, are almost invar- 
iably deceived by him. At this perform- 
ance he sang several ballads in a high fal- 
setto, making one change of costume. ..The , 
numbers were fairly well-liked, but when 
he suddenly remarked in big natural voice 
that that was an for the evening, removing 
his wig, there was a murmur of astonish- 
ment. ... 

"The Man Hunt," a bed-room playlet 
written by Harian Thompson and Hugh 
Herbert, and presented by William B. 
Friedlander, held the interest of the audi- 
ence. The act has been very cleverly writ- 
ten, has humorous lines, excellent situ- 
ations, and is well acted. The story deals 
with a young girl who has a habit of sleep- 
walking. During the first scene, after a 
house party, when all are asleep, she walks' 
into a man's bed-room. The morning 
brings interesting developments. Finally, 
when the girl is discovered in the man's 
room and* circumstances all point against 
her, the ' man announces that they bave 
been married. 1 They are left alone and, 
when the man suggests' that be never knew 
that the girl walked in her Bleep, she sug- 
gests, somewhat shyly, that she doesn't! 

Berk and. Valda followed the intermis- 
sion and 'Topics of the Day, in a dancing 
'act which 1 won it's fun- share of applause. 
The . turn 'is' finely sta'ged, - and the-'Wo 
'dance ^wml .- The 'girl -is' attractive "and 
tearns weU' 1 wfth ft^r partner. ; TherVwere 
several good';dances together-, anil" a few 
done alone by each of the' ttud.' ' 

Venita 'Gould impersonated a number 
of stage celebrities, most of them faith- 
fully, and before she had finished had reg- 
istered a tremendous hit. . She first ', imi- 
tated Grace La Bue and followed it with 
impressions of Jack Norworth singing his 
"Fancy Me" song from "Odds and Ends." 
Lenore TJlrich, Bert Williams' poker bit, 
Pay Bainter, Julian Eltinge, Mary. Nash, 
George M. Cohan, and last of all, Eva Tan- 
gnay. All of these imitations except that 
of Eva Tanguay, were announced. She 
took it for granted that that one would be 
recognized immediately. And it was. 

Ryan and Healey closed the show and 
held the audience in welL They rendered 
a number of popular tunes and some special 
numbers. There is a strong resemblance 
in their work to that of Van Schenck. 
Whatever one may think of their singing 
ability, they have, selected their tunes 
wisely, the closing number, sung to a wine 
bottle,, closing with the 'lines, "When yon 
come back, etc," always drawing applause. 
.... . .- L S. - 



raring Sisters, in.. an .aerial 
trapeze act opened the show. The girls 
have a routine of gymnastic feats that 
combine the ordinary -with the extraordi- 
nary, and they go through this routine 
with, lightning-like rapidity. They are 
clever gymnasts and good showmen, and 
their act scored a large hit' in the' opening 
position. 

Bill Robinson, a- colored nut comedian, 
came second. He is a clever boy, but be 
needs some parts of his act rewritten. On 
the whole, it is good, but his second song 
number could not be j heard,' and some of 
his gags didn't sink in deep enough. His 
singing and dancing are enjoyable to the 
utmost and he made the folks like it- The 
last dance was a corker, for a clog, and 
sent him over for a large hit. 

Collins and Hart, biUed aa the original, 
came: next with a comedy offering that 
comprised dancing, fake magic, and bur- 
lesque acrobatics. They open with a dance 
and follow with several bits of business, 
of -the slapstick variety. They next go into 
fake magic, in which they purposely ex- 
pose - their method of doing the tricks. 
' They close with a burlesque on a strong- . 
man act that was very laughable. One of 
them; held by a wire, from the flies at- 
tached to the seat of his trousers, went 
through a series of stunts that would make 
a real strong man turn pale green with 
envy. They scored a laughing hit, for the 
audience, took to them like a duck to water. 

-Janet Adair, assisted by Adelpbi, offered 
a cycle of song recitations. Miss Adair 
is a clever delineator of character songs, 
and her numbers have been chosen with 
care, for each of them' ia a hit In itself. 
She opened with a song in which she ex- 
pressed the opinions of several men as to 
their ideal girl. A popular comedy num- 
ber followed, and then a piano solo by 
A del phi. A darky number by Miss Adair 
followed, and closed her offering. She de- 
clined an encore,, which the audience seemed 
disposed to give herv 

Nat Nazzaro, .'assisted by the Atlantic 
Fleet Jazz Band, followed. . Nazaard is 
clever and certainly appeals to the audi- 
ence. His dancing went like wildfire. 
The audience liked this act immensely. 
A sailor who sang a number from one of 
the boxes, was received .with favor. 

Martin and Webb,: in' "Cousin Gusiipe" 
scored a tremendous' hit. One of the men 
works from the audience- for the greater 
part of the act, and his delineation of the 
"Wop", whose cousin .was on the stage 
caused roars on daughter. The: act opens 
with "The River Shannon," sung by the 
onet&n the stage. As soon: as he begins to 
tell stories his "cousin" down in the audi- 
ence, starts to carry , on, > and it. must be 
paid that the audience liked it. pis period- 
ical fits of anger" were typical of the Ital- 
ian. After a while he goes on the stage 
and he and his cousin make'pp. They 
close with some; .'singing in which 1 they har- 
monize nicely.'"/Tbey were for<$&l to take 
an encore, for which one sang "Home, 
Sweet Home," and toe other "Silver Bell." 

Herbert Clifton is an impersonator of 
more than "passing ' ability, * who not. only 
possesses the ability to -satirize' the weaker 
sex but also the high falsetto necessary' 
to make such characterization a success. 
His types are ell portrayed with a view to 
bringing out the humorous side of them, 
and Clifton succeeds admirably. He 
scored a tremendous hit and had to take an 
encore., •. . '.'. '•.. -/-' "'".. 

"The Only Girl," a condensed version of 
a one-time Broadway-, success, dosed the 
show, replacing . Henry Lewis, who. was 
unable to get to the theatre." "- 1 

- The act is a musical comedietta of the 
usual type, and made a hit with the audi- 
ence which remained intact tin the last 
curtain. The music of the act is very 
catchy and the comedy, which is plentiful, 
was wen handled by a cast of capable 
artists. ' . ~ . "' S. K. 



August 13, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




-NEW' BRIGHTON 

Following the opening overture by Ben' 
Roberts and his orchestra, who rendered 
"The New Sensation," ilartyn and Flor- 
ence started the bill off with a juggling 
«ct that contained quite a few new stunts. 
Martyn, who does most of the Juggling, 
went through a routine of feats, aging 
hoops, dubs, balls and various other kinds 
of apparatus. Florence, who assists him, 
did a few things in the line of juggling 
herself, and also displayed fair clog-dancing 
ability. \ '/_. 

Lou Reed and Al Tucker went well with 
their violin offering. The boys play wen, 
but lack something to liven up to their 
ability of "Full o' Pep." One of them 
played with, the bow in. his mouth; an- 
other time he rendered the "Poet and 
Peasant" overture with the bow held be- 
tween his legs, while the other executed 
a good eccentric dance. This same dancer, 
in his. violin solo,, would benefit himself 
and the act by using a later number than 
his. present song. The dosing of the act 
is good and, with a little more life injected 
into the . routine, the turn will make a 
dandy violin act. . 

Ruth Budd, a pretty girl, with pretty 
curls and charming personality, rendered 
an excellent account of herself. She offered 
a few songs, in a pleasing voice, did a neat 
dance, but gave the audience thrills 
a-plenty with her work in mid-air on the 
iron rings. Her maid rendered capable as- 
sistance and displayed a pretty pair of 
limbs in oue costume "which- she wore. 
Miss Budd is by no means lacking when 
it comes to an attractive figure. 

The Iightner Girls and Alexander picked 
up the applause where Ruth Budd left it 
off, and before they were half-way through, 
had a nice-sized .hit safely stored away. 
All three sing well, and, as a comedienne, 
one of the Misses Iightner is excellent. 
They offered a number of jazzy melodies, 
and for an encore rendered a new number 
by the Lightner girls, called "There's Al- 
ways Someone to Take Your Place." . , 

The United States Navy Club, of Hamp- 
ton Roads Naval Training Station, con- 
sisting of thirty-four neat appearing, gobs 
and Jerrey Swineford, their conductor, who 
organized them, .under the direction of 
William 6. Newman, sang their way into 
the favor of the audience and made an 
excellent impression. The boys all have 
good voices and a good variety of numbers, 
which, on - Monday, .-consisted of an: im- 
promptu program. The offering will be 
reviewed under New Acta, . 

During the intermission,- Bennie Roberts 
and his orchestra gave a' dandy jazz selec- 
tion from "Oh, What a Girt." 

Nate Leipzig' opened the second half to 
a skeptical, audience, but, after a few tricks, 
opening with his thimble stunts and a 'few 
card tricks, -soon had the people in the 
bouse wondering at the various feats which 
he performed, which were nothing short Of 
marvelous. Leipzig, besides being a very 
good card expert, has a knowledge of show- 
manship and displayed it to good advan- 
tage on this audience. 

Carlos Sebastian, the well-known dancer 
who has been absent . from the stage for 
a number of years, presented a new terpsi- 
chorean act that is artistic and portrays 
class from start to finish. In this act, he 
is assisted by Olga Myra and. Arthur An- 
derson, the latter at' the piano. Hiss Myra 
i« an attractive girl who possesses person- 
ality and dances exceptionally well. Se- 
bastian was wonderful, and the act Itself 
is exceptional.' It will be reviewed under 
New Acts. . 

George MacFarlane, assisted by Harry 
DaCosta at the piano, offered his song rou- 
tine and pleased. Da Costa rendered* 
few of his own numbers, and MacFarlane 
displayed his baritone voice to good. effect. 

Bessie Clifford closed the show with a 
posing act that is artistically presented 
from start to finish. • G. T. H. 



ORPHEUM 

Frank and Milt Britton style themselves 
"jazz Loan da" and certainly do inject a 
punch into their work,, which consists of 
playing a number of jazzy melodies upon 
the xylophone, trombone and cornet Both 
play the first named instruments together 
at the start, after which one of them uses 
a trombone, being joined later by bis team 
mate with a cornet. 

Harry and Grace Elsworth, man and 
woman, sang and danced. A' number of 
neat steps were revealed by them, some by 
the man drawing much applause. They 
opened with a rube song, and followed by a 
double dance. The feminine member of the 
duo then sang a jazzy song. It was fol- 
lowed by an eccentric dance by the man. 
They closed with a dance together. The 
dance by Harry Elsworth, alone, was the 
best thing in the act. 

Hugh Herbert, assisted by a supporting 
cast of three, none of whom was named 
upon the program, .presented a playlet 
entitled "Mind your own business." The 
turn went over mainly because of the ex- 
cellent work of the principal. But, as far 
as the situations, lines and other qualities 
are concerned, the act does not compare 
favorably with other sketches in which 
Herbert has been seen. 

Walter and Emily Walters, ventrilo- 
quists, the woman member of the team 
being ffrogramed as the only female ven- 
triloquist doing a perfect baby, ventrilo- 
quially amused the gathering with a num- 
ber of bits. The spectacle of two ventrilo- 
quists, man and woman, working side by 
side, is something new in acts of this sort. 
Both are experts in their line and they 
scored a good-sized hit. 
' Sylvia 1 Jason and William Haig are a 
duo of clever entertainers who present a 
neat appearance' and work in excellent 
form. The tun is somewhat long, but their 
performance is interesting, throughout. 
The offering is. nicely pat on and includes 
a number of pleasing songs and dance num- 
bers. 

Ralph C. Faulkner bears a startling re- 
semblance to the President, which comes 
as a surprise. He delivers a monologue, 
most of which consists, of a number of gags 
that have been heard before. He knows 
how to deliver it, but his material lacks 
quality. • . .,: '', 

.Georgette and Capitola De, Wolf have an 
act, by far the most important part of 
wjhich is their display of costumes., . There 
is a song running through it which has a 
pleasing, .melody, and some of their dances 
will hold the' eye. Much of their vocal 
work, however, is difficult to hear. The 
turn is long and drags somewhat. It will 
probably interest women more than men 
because of the display of wearing apparel. 
Marie Nordstrom, in an act consisting of 
pieces of Terse written by her sister, 
Frances Nordstrom, was well . received and 
maintained interest throughout. She is 
possessed of a pleasing personality, presents 
an excellent appearance and uses- her ma- 
terial, to the best advantage. Her opening 
piece, the hook and eye recitation, was 
nicely delivered. The talk centered about 
various hats was liked. ■ There was an imi- 
tation of a ballad singer and then of the 
performer who sings war songs, the only 
deviations from the talking. A humorous 
bit, dealing with dance, lessons, before and 
after marriage and a few other bits, of 
rhyme closed. 

Burnt . and Frabito have presented their 
"wop" comedy act on numerous occasions. 
and many vaudeville patrons have seen it. 
Yet, it remains the same interesting offer- 
ing. ! The team is one of the best "wop" 
comedy! teams in vaudeville to-day. 

The Magleys, Guy and Pearl, closed with 
a dance act which, while somewhat long 
for a closing act, held the crowd in until 
the finish. - " L S.- 



AMERICAN 

Francis and Wilson, man and 
opened the show here and set a slow pace, 
which was maintained by most of the acts 
on the first half. The two offered some 
tumbling and acrobatic work with a little 
dancing of slight merit. Their comedy is 
not in the least bit funny, especially the 
patter and . the slap-stick. 
. Chong is a little Chinese who possesses 
a pleasing voice, but has not picked a good 
repertoire of songs to show it off. "I Hear 
You Calling Me," for instance, is entirely 
too heavy a number for his kind of voice 
and should be changed for something 
lighter. Several numbers rendered on a 
banjo scored strongly, .and played in Ha- 
waiian guitar fashion were most pleas- 
ant. His yodelling bit, in which he 
accompanies himself on the guitar, is 
the best part of his act and netted him 
an encore at the dose. ' '-*. 

Ed Allen and Taxi, a man and a trained 
dog, went well with their sketch. The skit 
gives the 1 dog an opportunity to go through 
a series of stunts, most of which are ordi- 
nary, such as fetching various articles of 
clothing at command. One, however, has 
been done by very few dogs su ccessfu lly, 
and that is putting on a "souse." Taxi, 
who is the dog in the act, did this very 
well and received a big band for it. The 
burglar bit at the close of. the act has 
much room for improvement, but pleased' 
here. Allen would do well to wear a better- 
fitting suit 

Downing and Bunln are a' couple, with 
the personality and ability to handle' much 
better material than their present act af- 
fords, and they should get it. . The gsgs in 
this act are old and put it at a disadvan- 
tage. The girl is pretty and makes a / good 
comedienne, while the young man, al-' 
though inclined to overdo certain bits, 
pleases a* a whole. 

Jean Leighton's Revue, consisting of 
Miss Leighton and five men in black-face, 
closed the first half. ' The set consists of 
some • singing and gags, and a dance by 
one of the men. . ;' ■ 

Gladys Kelton, who opened the second 
section, - is an attractive . brunette - who 
plays the xylophone well. She opened with 
a medley of operatic numbers, which, for 
the most' part, consisted of Brahm's "Hun- 
garian Rhapsody." The ""Rosary ?*' played 
with two sticks in each hand, followed; and 
a" medlar of jsxs came after that. - Miss 
Kelton took- one encore, but would do 
well to add a few more numbers to her 
offering, especially in the encore, in. which - 
she should ose a later number than her 
present one.; .-* " -•>■ - ~- • 

"Our Boy" is a good comedy playlet that 
wasn't given half the chance it should have 
by: the cast who presented it here. Two 
men and two women are in the offering, 
and of the four, it can only be said that 
two were nearly fair. The young man 
who plays the part of Charlie would make 
an excellent juggler, judging from the 
dramatic ability which he displayed. -The 
playlet is supposed to tell of the quarrels 
of a young married couple because of a 
misunderstanding,' and, with a cast that 
knew how to act, it may have a chance to 
get somewhere. '" 

Clark and Crawford stopped the show 
with their tramp offering. The opening 
part of the act can be greatly improved by 
' the addition of" newer gaga, for the ones 
^thst are offered at present are older than 
" the first joke book 'ever', printed. The lat- 
ter part of the act, especially the Scotch 
.bits, are. very good, and the Harry T>,ufa» 
imitation, although not announced- as such, 
is excellently done. ... 

Judge and. Gail closed the show with a 
fast going- aerial acrobatic; offering, - 

" ; g. j. h. 



McVICKERS 

(Chicago) 

Louis Leo, evidently recently discharged 
from the Navy, was honored by opening 
the program at McVicker's Theatre 
with a ■ series . of feats in which ha dis- 
played his ability in knotting a hit of 
rope, doing some acrobatic feats, and then 
exhibiting cleverness in ladder h»i»»yH»»g 
Leo worked as if he had forgotten his rou- 
tine while sailing o'er the billows, He 
was well received. ... 

Gaynell and. Mack are a man and 
woman who possess a wide knowledge of 
acrobatic, hard and soft shoe dancing. The 
man is very light on his feet, while bis 
partner is a wonderful hard shoe dancer. 
The act elicited appreciative applause. 

Casetta and Roydell attempted to dis- 
play their ability as dancers of society 
steps but proved a miserable failure. . The 
couple did not work in uniaion and gawked 
about the stage aa if they were amateurs. 
Better dancing has been seen an. try out 
nights, and Casetta and Roydell should go 
in. for more practice before again talrtwg 
up their route. 

. Al Taylor stirred up the first bit of en- 
thusiasm with a cleverly written mono- 
logue which is devoted to up-to-date topics 
and wj^eb. is very timely. Taylor deliv- 
ered his gags in tip-top, style with the re- 
sults that nearly everyone of them were 
accorded hearty laughter. Taylor is new 
to these- parts and was deserving of the 
recognition given him. 

The Two Ovandoa officiated with' some 
snappy selections on xylophones which 
kept the audience tapping time. The con. 
pie form a new duo, making a dainty ap- 
pearance and playing like two old masters. 
Their repertoire consists, of heavy operas 
and ragtime. Both were proficient and 
were Wildly applauded, 

McConn ell and Sim peon scored the hit 
of the program with their comedy sketch 
in which Miss Simpson takes the honors. 
It is their old act, but Chicago audiences 
never seem 'to tire of their nonsense. The 
offering is lively and well handled by the 
trio. Miss Simpson is aa comical as ever 
and created more laughter in fifteen min- 
utes than has been heard in the house in 
the past three months. 

Florence Ring defied the eagle eye of 
the committee of .fifteen by stripping 
down to a very dainty pair of combination 
in full of the audience in order to make 
three startling changes of costume. Miss 
Ring possesses a very .sweet voice indeed 
and her numbers are splendidly done. Her 
costumes are dainty— what there la of 
them — and' are well woriL 



difficulty in convincing her 



la; had' no 

she was indeed artistic, both in form and 
ability. ' ' ~ •' '" P 

Slaymam AU's Arabs, minus the' usual 
wild whoops^- closed the show. They Open 
with a few artistic poses and then go in 
for some pyramid building, followed by 
some excellent acrobatic feats. The act 
is a snappy one and has been switched to 
meet modern ideas. This aggregation kept 
the audience in until the final trick was 
performed. H. F. B. 



PROVDfCETOWMERS AGAIN ACTIVE 
The Provincetowa Players, who will 
open their season on Oct. 31, intend to 
present a new biH every five weeks in- 
stead of every four weeks this season, 
and play each for two weeks Instead of 
one. A campaign to increase the member- 
ship is under way. 



"WHAT'S THE IDEA" OPENS AUG. 25 

Rice and Cadv will be starred during 
the coming season in "What's the Idea?*' 
to be presented by F. V. Peterson. The 
offering will open its season In Schenec- 
tady on Aug. 25. In the casfr will be teen 
Entitle Francis, Louise Wolf, Bessis liny, 
Marion Vernon, William Dougherty, Jack 
Bernard and others. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13, 1919 




:.-. 



2 



CARLOS SEBASTIAN & CO. 



Theatre — New BW^Mon. 
Style — Dancing. 
Tine — Twenty minute*. 
Setting — Full stage {special). 

Carlos Sebastian is already known to 
theatregoers as a good dancer, and his 
new act, in which he is assisted by Olga 
Myra, is proof of his ability. Arthur 
Anderson assists at the piano and gives. 
a good account of himself^ 

Before anything is said about the danc- 
ing or the act itself, mention should be 
made of the costuming and the settings, 
which axe excellent. The setting, par- 
ticularly, is artistic. At the rear of the 
stage, which is set in light blue, is a 
staircase which leads to another stage 
• some feet higher than the house stage. 
On this,- a, special set for each number 
is shown. 

.The act opens with Sebastian on a 
settee dreaming of "Bubbleland," and 
Olga. The curtain to the other stage 
then rises and "Bubbleland" is shown, 
- with Olga amidst a multitude of various 
colored and sized balloons, flying in mid- 
air. She plays the violin and, at the 
same time, dances with him. 

Carlos, also displays a good voice in 
some singing'... A dance by Olga, with 
the violin, follows, and is well done. . The 
next number, by the two.-is programed 
as a "Dardenella - Dance," a Spanish 
fantasy. 

' After a well-executed piano solo by 
Anderson, the two then go through a 
"Raffles Pantomime Dance," which por- 
trays, in dancing, a Raffles taking a 
lady's jewels from her boudoir, while 
she dozes. She awakes' and the dance 
which follows is related to the Apache, 
and is excellently done. They close with 
a fast jazz number. 

The act, as it stands,, is ready "or a 
position on any bis- time bin. G. J. II. ■ 

U. S . NAVY GLEE CLUB 

Theatre — New Brighton. 

Style— Sixginir.- ■;' 

Time — Tirenty minutes. 
Setting — In three (special). 

Thirty- three gobs, .one more at 'the 

. piano, and Jerry Swineford conducting, 
make up a singing- act -that will -score in 
the big time houses. - All .are arrayed in 
white uniforms and. present a very; at- 
tractive .appearance. The gobs are at 

■ present -all regulars, but will be dis- 
charged next- week 'so as to enable them 

..to go an tour. . . ..... , : . 

Opening with .the' "Soldiers Chorus" 
from , "Faust," they offered a variety of 

; gongs that are not usually heard in 
vaudeville,, for most of them are special 

.numbers. A few', camp songs are also 
included in the sonsaloguS. One of the 
bovs renders a. whistling solo-. and does 

.it wen.-:'--. ^,-: r ..> \; * •; .'■■ 

AH of them sing- well and, with s 
little more to the offering,, it will find 
*asy .going." ... ■; •: : -i--1s G. : J.- H. v. 



VIOL-INN ■■■>• 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd j8f. 

Style — Musical corned*: * ?v? '* 4 ; 

Time — Twenty-four minutes. . 

Setting— SpedaL - . - -' .-'— ' 

Herman Tim berg's old act with Sar- 
anoff now heading it instead of Timberg. 
Rest of the company is unchanged. 
Snranoff is a better violinist than Tim- 
berg. but does not do as well as Timberg 
did with the talk, nor can he dance as 

well. . 

The turn' runs .with a fair amount of 
smoothness, and win probably be able to 
hold its own in the better houses before 
long. It is not as yet quite ready for 
the big time, however. The comedy por- 
tion of the torn, that centered about the 
hotel hoy, needs bolstering up, but other- 
wise the offering needs little changing. 

IS. 




M OR EY, SENNA AND LEE 

Theatre — Keeney's. :' f 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Twenty minutes. 

Setting— In one. 

. Morey, formerly of Harris, Golet and 
Mprey, has two new partners with him, 
and is doing an act much the same as 
the other. The only change is the elim- 
ination of the piano and the new song 
numbers. The opening is the same and 
so is the closing. The act ia a well put 
together and rendered song offering, with 
plenty of comedy interspersed. There is 
a certain amount of snggestiveness about 
some 'of their remarks, but they got 
over big. ; 

... They open with a chant, strumming 
upon various instruments. This is fol- 
lowed by a solo number by the tallest of 
the three, in which the.others sing paro- 
dies on his version of a song. Then 
comes a solo by the shorter of the three. 
A comedy bit in which a lino, "without 
a shirt," is used is suggestive, bat is a 
sure fire laugh getter. . 

For a closer they sang their famous 
"Room 202." As an encore they sang 
their own version of " Ja-da." 

The act will undoubtedly follow in the 
footsteps of its predecessors. In a meas- 
ure, it deserves to. It lacks only one 
thing that the other had. It does not 
* compare to the other in the rendition 
of ''blues" numbers. S. K. 



McCORMACK AND MELLON 

Theatre— Royal. 
Style— .Danetrv and Singing.' 
Time — Fourteen Minutes.. 
Setting— In one. >-.-...-' 

Joseph McCormack and. Harry Mellon 
are two clever dancers who work 
smoothly and display a number of diffi- 
cult steps.' Their singing is fair, as is 
their attempt at dispensing comedy. 

But their dancing, the' feature of the 
act; is excellent . Both are masters of 
eccentric dancing and. are a likeable pair. 
They have everything in their fa«or.nnd 
. should have no trouble in any other big 
i time? houses. - 

. They started with a "Dixie" song, to- 
. geiher. This was followed, by a ballad 
rendered, by one of them on .the ; violin, 
concluding with a few steps. The other 
member of the team then did ah eccentric 
dance that -brought the hduse, down. Each 
then did a dance alonei followed by a 
few gags and bite of talk. At the finish, 
one of them was dancing .while playing 
the violin, the other dancing at. a lively 
rate. They danced off together. L S. 



LOLA GIRLIE AND COMPANY 

Theatre-rB»ffAty-/Jrrt St. 

Style — Dancing. ' - ■ _,'...,-,., 

"Time — Fourteen minutes. ...',-. -. 

Setting— Special. t / --; 

... Loin • Girlie, formerly .with . Ivan 
Bankoff, is now presenting a; new danc- 
ing act -in which she is assisted, by two 
girls, programmed as Mile. lona and 
Lillian. Both of these girls dance well. 
The principal is a capable exponent of 
the art of stepping and the girls give 
her excellent support. The offering is 
ready for the big time right now. 

An interpretive, dance by the trio 
started the act in fine fashion. One of 
the a««i«Htig girls then did a dance 
which was one of the, best portions of 
the act. There was another dance by the 
.Misses lona and Lillian, after which the 
principal did a dance alone, which was 
not so good. The three closed with an 
ensemble dance which met with approval 
and made a worthy closing number. ' 

I. S. 



CHARLES UPSON AND CO. 

Theatre — Keith's. Jersey City. 

Style — Comedy playlet. 

Time — Twenty minutes. 

Setting— full stage and one. 

The author of this sketch must have 
been acquainted with Columbus, or some-' 
one who lived before, his time, for the . 
-theme of the playlet, the. way in which 
it has been carried out and everything, 
else about it shows age and a distinct 
lack of originality. Authors of motion 
' picture scenarios, playwrights, "successful 
and unsuccessful, have used the same 
plot so many times that even the Jersey 
City audience took it with a spirit of "in- 
difference. 

The act is presented by a cast of four, 
two men and two women. The j principal 
has a Hebrew character role, but his dia- 
lect-is very unnatural. The fellow who 
has the part of Kelley, the Irish member 
of the police force is only fair. The 
other two members of the company have 
very -easy, parts. The offering, as a 
whole, is much below the standard re- 
quired in the better houses. 

The curtain rises on a- drop in one, de- 
picting a pawn shop. A feminine figure, 
draped in black, slowly works its way 
toward the entrance. A child is huddled 
close in its arms. Darkness makes the 
scene all the more sombre. The figure 
walks into the pawnshop, whereupon the 
curtain drops and a slide is flashed upon 
a screen, bearing the inscription "Eight- 
een years later." 

Whether this portion was intended for 
a laugh or' was meant seriously is diffi- 
cult to determine. If it was meant as 
a bit of comedy, it succeeded, for the 
' greater part of ' the audience grinned. 
Scene number two sees the interior of 
the home of the pawnbroker.' A girl, 
busy at one side of the room,, instantly 
suggests' 'that she is the child of the 
other scene. The old man is playing 
pinochle with the young detective, 
KeUey. Peculiarly, the Irishman is out- 
playing the Jew. The old man is wor- 
ried about something, and .Kelly has 
-trouble getting' it out of him. 
• - •' The pawnbroker finally divulges a 
secret. He tells a tale of how in the 
old days he had. been made hard-hearted 
by misfortune. He became wealthy, but 
lacked sunshine in his home. Then the 
old woman appeared,, pawned her child, 
and- paid the , interest -. constantly as' 
though the baby was. a commodity. The 
girl in his home, explains the old chap, 
has brightened his life and he could not 
"give her up. now: Her mother, however, 
had claimed the girl. •'..'''"_' 

Kelley then suddenly receives a call to 
report at the police station. He explains 
that he will soon return. A - woman 
walks in- and demands the child. . The 
old fellow argues with her, but she de- 
mands the - girL She 'has, -however, 
reckoned' "without • the doughty son of 
Erin. Kelley comes to the rescue. '-, He 
strides in and in .accents bold announces 
that he knows the woman and that she 
is a 'notorious crook. Of course, KeUey 
gets the pawn- ticket from her, but in- 
stead of kissing the . girl, . or marrying 
her; the final scene sees the pawnbroker 
and Kelley holding a sort of jubilee'. The 
woman crook has explained her purpose 
in trying to get the girl. She says she 
> met the child's mother in a cell out on 
the coast and got the ticket. Her only 
intention was to get some money which 
the girl's father, now deceased, had left 
her. Kelley warns her to. make herself 
scarce and she vanishes. Everybody is 
happy. Pawnbroker concludes with the 
remark that some day the Irish and Jews 
will rule the world. Sons of Erin and 
Jerusalem highly pleased. Next act..' 

LS. 



BILLY AND IRE>IE TELAAK 



Theatre— Proctor's 58<A St. 

Style — Singing and instrumental. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting— In two. ■ 

After an introduction by the orchestra, 
and the young lady at the piano, Billy 

. renders a popular jazs number which is 
an incongruous opening, for the jazz in 
the midst of the classical does not mix. 
Following the song, both do a dance 
which he completes alone and which re- 
vealed one of the big faults of the act 

Both are attractive and have personality. 
But they have a variety of different 
steps, which they are so anxious to pre- 
sent all at once that there is hardly any 
connection between one and the other. 
A little more grace to their movements 
would not harm their dancing in the 
least, especially Billy's. 
! The remainder of the offering consist- 
ed of violin playing by both of them. 
Some of it resembled playing, but moat 
of it reminded one of a conference of 
cats on the back fence at midnight. The 
reason for that may have been that they 
have poor instruments. - Another reason 
may be that they forgot to rosin their 
bows. But we fear that' the real reason 
is that Billy and Irene Telaak have as 
yet to learn to play the violin. At this 
house, when reviewed, the went big, and 
took an encore. But in a theatre where 
the audience understands music the re- 
sult is doubtful. -.:..'■'. G.J.H. 



"THE FINANCIERS" . - , 

Theatre — City. 

Style — Quintet. 

Time — Thirty minute*. 

Setting — Special, in four. ■ 

This act carries five men who take 
diverse character roles.' One is French, 
another. Irish,, a third Italian, a fourth 
Jewish, and the fifth straight 

They '"open with a. quartet number 
from which the Jew : is excluded, and fol- 
low with a mock business meeting of a 
fake film company, in which the Irish- 
man and the Jew do all the nominating, 
electing, proposing and ratifying of offi- 
cers. A banquet of- "Brotherly Love" ia 
then given, but when they sit down to a 
table, a fight starts between' the ""Wop" 
and the Jew over' which bas a right to 
most of the table.. '''.[■ 

The Frenchman then comes in and 

soon there is a small imitation of "The 

Tower of Babel." The Irishman acts as 

judge of the foreign language, contest 

and declared the- Jew the winner, as his 

-language has them all stopped.' They 

closed with a- song. number in which they 

'-'harmonized nicely. For an encore they 

, sang . another comedy song number. - 

This act should find no truoble in get- 
ting a feature spot .on the small and bet- 
ter small time bills, . . .- S. K.- •; 



- ■•'•: .- 



JOHN CUTTY 

Theatre^-Ft/*A' Av enue. ■ 
Styte—JfiMicaX ' :'v\" 

Time — Ten minutes. -'' 
Setting— One and two. ' \" 

John Catty, formerly of the Musical 
Cnttys, is presenting a single which in- ■ 
-eludes work on the marimba, cornet and 
piano. He is a chap who presents a 
modest appearance and generally is a re- 
tiring sort of fellow. His playing is 'fully 
up to the mark' and will probably 'enable 
him' to score a success on the better small* 
time. .' ' ,J '"„ 

He opened with a medley of popular 
selections upon the marimba; in one. ' A ! 
piano solo, well played, followed in two, 
and, after playing a classical piece, he 
closed with a popular tune. A ballad 
upon a cornet was followed by a jazzy 
' tune. Cutty closed with what he styled 
- a negro version of a bugle call, given on 
the cornet, and a popular dance melody. ' 
The - manner, in- which he rendered 'tile 
selection- drew a generous', round of ap- 
plause, fully merited. ;:■ X S. 



August 13, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




Wally Eddinger -Jiai his first hair- cut 



Orland W. Vaaanan. 

Frederick C Mailer 



Published by the 
CLIPPER CORPORATION 

..President and Secretary 
Treason* 



e Jansen 



1604 Broadway. New York 
Telephone Bryant 61 17-6118 

ORLAND W. VAUGHAN. EDITOR 
Paul C Sweinhart, Managing Editor 

NEW YORK, AUGUST 13, 1919 



Entered Jane 24, 1879, at the Post Office at 
New York, N. Y., as second dais matter, un- 
der the act of March 3, 1879. 

THE CUPPER ia issued every WEDNESDAY. 
Forms Close on Monday at 5 P. M. 

SUBSaUPTION ... 

One year, in advance, 84; aix months, 82; 
three months, $1. Canada and foreign postage 
extra. Single conies will- be sent, 'postpaid, on 
receipt of 10 cents. 

ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON 
APPLICATION v 



T^nty; ? fiye gT-flop ACQ 

Patti Rosa died in New York. . 

Watty Eddi 
^at Patchortue, 
yv Frederick Boner waa with 
m "MiSa T>ynamjle." - ■ "V .. — 

■* Living Pictures were refused permit* to* 
show at Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Cora Tanner sang at the Manhattan 
Beach Theatre, Coney Island, N. Y. 

Charles. Frohmsn's Stock Company 
opened at the Baldwin, San Francisco, in 
"Sowing the Wind.".. 

The Boston Howard Atheneum Star 
Specialty! Company included Caicedo, 
Eunice Vance, Kalkaska, the Eddy Fam- 
ily and - Pi trot. - - 




Office— Room 841, State Lake Bldg. 
- Hajiy F. Rose, Mam ao«. 
' • Sam Fraadaco OSoa— 830 Market St. 
.'...' K- Cohsji, MaHAOsa. 

Address All, Communications to . 
THE NEW YORK CUPPER .."'.' 
i MM Broadway, New York - . 

Rtzitterrd Cable Addrrii, "Aumottrr." . 

The Currta cam "is osraiirss whou»u«» 
UTAtL, at our agents, Gorringc American New* 
Agency, 17 Green Street, Charing Croat Road, 
London, W. C, England; Breotano'e New* De- 
pot. 37 Avenue de T'Opera. Paris, France: Gor- 
don & Gotch, 123 Pitt Street, Sydney, N. S. W., 
Australia. ■ .. ... 



JUST ONE LONG SEASON 

The term, "end of the theatrical season," 
U losing its significance. There, does not 
appear to be any considerable cessation of 
theatrical activities due to the coming of 
hot weather, as in the past. 

This was' evidenced earlier this Summer, 
when sot only did most of the important 
shows continue running, but new shows, 
musical as well as dramatic, have been 
opening from' week to week, their owners 
apparently being unmindful of the Summer 
traditions of the past. 
•- A number of road shows did close, as 
of yore, but the' owners of these, for the 
most part, are sorry they did, and now 
have, called the members of their companies 
together for early rehearsal so that they 
maybe sent on tour, again befor September 
1, if possible. i:*; 

All of which is indicative of the great 
demand throughout the country for all 
fprms of theatrical entertainment.- It also 
portends a new era for the show business. 

This does not mean that the public will 
take to its heart any sort of show that 
I producers see fit to foist upon it. As a 
. matter of fact, the public was never more 
discriminative than it is at the present 
time. The people want good "'shows, and, 
the. the case of musical plays, it will not 
patronize ones that have' no semblance of 
lavish expenditure. ~" 

, Until this Summer, most of the im- 
portant theatres were closed' by -the first 
week in July. But not so this year. Dur- 
ing that month at least two dramatic 
successes were holding over at theatres 
along Broadway, and, in addition, there 
were at least ten other kinds of plays 
showing to capacity, and unprecedented 
number of first-class productions, to be 
running in first-class houses in July. 

This had the effect of causing producers 
to hustle their new shows into shape for 
early presentation. Mid-season terms and 
rentals prevailed for all classes of houses 
along Broadway. The result is that by 
September, the actors' -strike permitting, 
there will not be a single first-class house 
closed. Every one of them will house some 
show, and, in addition, will have a waiting 
list of producers. . . ' - . 



G. R.— Henry DeVries is the inventor 
and owner of the act "Camouflage.'" 

Z. M. — Klaw and Erlanger produced 
"PoUyanna." 

D. B.— "The Prime Minister" waa writ- 
ten by Hail Caine. 



A. N.— -William CClare was an Irish 
singing comedian. He played the U. B. O. 
circuit. . . .■ - 



G. K.— Harry Fitzgerald is a booking 
agent with offices in the -Palace Theatre 

Building. ' - 

S. D. — Sophie Tucker is going into the 
Mclntyre and Heath show. She has a 
jazz band with her. .'. . - r . 

' Q. T.— Sarah Padden appeared in "The 
Clod." It was a* Washington Square 
Players' playlet. 

C. B. — Ernest R. Ball is a composer. 
Yes, he has been appearing in vaudeville 
with Maud Lambert. 



C B.-^William Desmond played the 
leading role in "Eilmeny." It was a 
Morosco Photoplay, Inc., production. 

D. G. — ■ Wilt on Lackaye was seen in a 
criminal play last season. Yes, he has a 
son, Wilton Lackaye, Jr. Don't think so. . 

W- S. 8. — The young lady to whom you 
have reference is Bay Hussar. Your can 
address her at the Winter Garden. 



C. B. — Elsie La Bergere formerly did a 
posing act with the "Maids of America" 
company in burlesque. ■ ' •". " 

H, B.^"Mr. Myd'a Mystery" was a 
three-act farce presented- at the Comedy 
Theatre by Joseph Brooks, opening on 
Aug; 16, 1915. ■ 

M. H.— "Watch Your Step" opened at 
the Illinois Theatre, Chicago, on Sep- 
tember- 6, 1915, with Frank Tinney, Mr. 
and Mrs. Vernon Castle, Brice and King 
and Harry Kelly in the cast. 

C M. J. — 'Flo Lewis has gone back with 
her .old vaudeville partner, Jay Gould . 
Tot Qualters is' playing her role in Jimmy 
Hussey*s act. '.■:.»-- 



G. H. K. — (1) Jimmy Hussey is not 
married to Flo Lewis. (2) Flo Lewis was 
formerly teamed up with Jay Gould and 
later with Frank Joyce. (3) Art North- 
rup, the pianist of the act, wrote the 
music and Hussey the lyrics. (4) The 
member that, does- the dance to which yon 
refer is. the drummer, Stewart Allen. 

W. S. J. — The organization. to which you 
refer, was known as the Actor's Society 
' of America. The annual meeting you 
mention was held on Thursday, June 10, 
1915, at the Amsterdam Opera House. 
William F. Haddock was elected president, 
George Henry Trader first vice-president, 
and Louise Kent second vice-president. 
Perhaps one of the old members of the 
society may see this and be able to give 
the information you wish. - 



. X 1 . K.— Birdie Conrad ia Eddie Conrad's 
wife. He announces her as his sister for 
the act only. Their present act does re- 
semble the .old onojn bits, hut most of the 
material is few. ^ • "»-^_i 'C*"^' 

Sr-B. J.— H-you want- any- information 
about the old Whirlwind DeForests ad- 
dress Tom Jones, care of the Putnam 
Building, as he was. the male 'member of 
that team. The other DeForests you have 
in mind were Miss DeForest,' who was 
Tom's partner, and Al. Jones, who took 
the name DeForest when Tom Jones went 
into the booking business. AL is Tom's 
brother. ■*.--■- -.-• 



Rkk« Rattles 



*M- 



W. B. — Hazel Boyne is on the road at 
present in C. ' B. Maddock's "Not . Yet 
Marie." A letter addressed to O. B. Mad- 
dock, in the Fitzgerald Building, will be 
forwarded to her. 



TTTJAWHS UPUH TJS=- 

' ''The critics' avers right"' when they said 
i- "The Bed Dawn" wouldn't see much day- 
light. . 

111 THESE DATS OP H. C. L. 

Oliver Morosco ought to be able to get 
any price he demands this season for 
"Civilian Clothes." 

THEY TOO 

Leo Newmann, the ticket broker, says he 
thinks the actors at the Marionette The- 
atre, that opens Friday night,- win go out 
on strike next week. 



GRACE LA RUE MUST 
ACT DOWN TO PART TO 
PUT NEW PIECE OVER 



•THE WONDERFUL WORKSHOP." — 

a romantic comedy In three acta, by 
Hale Hamilton and Luther A. Reed. 
Produced Angnat 4, 1MB, at the Ful- 
ton Theatre, Oakland. California. 

THE CAST. 

Morgan Craig Hale Hamilton 

Wilbur Oglerle ....Prank K. Wallace 

Shell, Willie Soldy Roach 

Robert Jaekson ....John Sbeehan 

Gordon Peck • Hugh Knox 

Joseph Renard...'. Paul Barren 

lira. Camer Merle Stanton 

April Blair ...Grace Ia Rue 

Anthony Turner George P. Webster 

Herbert Xawton Prank Sarlea 

Manor Betrjoid ...':.;. ....... John Iran 

Clarence (Japanese servant) . Elbert Barton 

Dudley Quail Jerome Sheldon 

Maid .....Mildred McNeil 

Mrs. Wilbur Oglerle Marie Donate 



With a view of production in New York 
'The Wonderful Workshop" is receiving 
a premiere tryont at the Fulton Theatre, 
Oakland, Cah, with Grace La Rue in the 
leading role of April Blair, an abject 
slavey in the Home for Literary and Ar- 
tistic Failures. 

In this role it is necessary for Miss La 
Hue to school herself in a* new field if 
she is to win recognition as a' star on the 
dramatic stagehand it is doubtful whether 
the present vehicle will ever fit her type. 
She seems unable to act down to her new 
role, and there is not even a serious at* 
tempt at a slavey make-up. Bather, the 
star is much the same Grace La Rue that 
headlined two-a-day vaudeville.' She has 
retained all that poise, elegance and self- 
reliance which is so foreign to a correct 
slavey /characterization. ., 

The action of the. piece revolves around 
a slavey who finally becomes a marvelous 
stage celebrity and a theatrical success. 
Miss La' Ru^'s beat work, as a result, is 
in tie third act when ahe has cast her 
slavey clothes' and. work-a-day atmos- 
phere aside to become a great actress, in. 
which act she has a chance to characterize 
her real, self and does it admirably. 

As a faithful music master and a dis- 
guised young millionaire, Hale Hamilton, 
in the role of Morton Craig, is excellent. 
The supporting cast handle their respect- 
ive roles artistically and with under- 
standing. 

There is no place in the play that the 
suspense element is exceptional, the end 
of the piece being obvious almost from 
the very start. The metamorphosis in the 
slavey's philosophy of life between- the 
acts is more stagey than real, for in one 
act she is a simple PoUyanna, while in the 
following she has changed into an actress 
who is worldly-wise with but little 
thought for the rest of- the universe. 



FAY SIGNED FOR NEW PIECE 

Frank Fay, at present appearing in 
"Oh, What a Girll" at the Shubert The- 
atre, has been engaged to play the leading 
role late next fall in "Strictly Business* 
a musical comedy. "Strictly Business" is 
a musicalized version of "The Third 
Party," and will he staged by Edward 
Clark, who wrote and staged "Oh, What a 
Girl!" • ' 



WHO STARTED THE WAR 

Harvey Green wants to know how tha 
managers came to get. mixed up in a fight 
with the A . E. F. He says he thinks they 
have enough to do -fighting the actors. 

LOOKING AHEAD 

Wonder what . will happen when the 
Shimmey grows old. Probably someone 
will then introduce a dance in which you 
only move your ears. 

GEORGE IS PERPLEXED 

George Sing wants to know how it ia 
that Billy Watson hasnt tried to sign 
Galli-Curci for his show. "I hear she's 
pretty good," says George. 

THINGS YOU NEVER SEE 
Joe Towle with a big head of hair. 
Eva Tanguay opening a show. 
Belasco failures. 
The S. R. O. sign at the Public Library. 



BOX-OFFICE SHOW TITLES 
Still Listening to Lester. 
The Haul of Babylon. - 
The Royalty Vagabond. 
She's a Good Drawing-Card. 
Monte Carlo, Jr. 



-- '■•'.-■■ 



FAMOUS STRIKES 

Gold— In California, 1848. 
Diamonds— In Kimberley. 
Garment Workers — Every season. 
White Rats — Scampered two yean ago. 
Equity— Now till the end. . 

THINGS WORTH HAVING 

Bob Baker's knowledge of the stock mar- 
ket ■ \ . 

Arthur Lyons' pompadour. 

Sam Bernstein's opinion of himself. 

Everybody else's opinion of Sam Bern- 
stein. '.- 



WORSE AND WOSSE 

We gladly agree with friend Omar Khay- 

yum, 
' That this little world's getting all on the 

hum, 
For how can a fellow now have a good 

timet ,i . 

There can't be wild women without any 

ram. 



NOTES OF THE OFF SEASON 
Harvey Green spends the week end at 

Canarsie. 

Phil Busch. finds out that too many "hot 
dogs" are bad for the interior. 

Allan Spencer Tenney cleans out the 
supply of toothpicks at the Automat. 
. Al Leichter forgets to ask for matches 
with his Meceas. 

Abe Feinberg takes a haircut. 

THEATRICAL FAIRY TALES, NO. 5 

An actor was once greatly shocked to 
find out that so many of his fellow per- 
formers had each been married more than 
once. "To .find that such is the condition 
grieves 'muh' sorely," said he, having dis- 
covered that expression in a book of verse, 
"only one wife was intended for each 
man." Soon he married, and befi re long 
he got sick of bis bride. He .wovld not 

sacrifice his principles, h o w e ver, and held 
on to her. But, believing that ft was 
perfectly proper to do- as the Romans do in 
Rome, he moved. But' not to Rome ;' no, 
it waa either to Salt Lake City or Con- 
stantinople. We can't remember just 
which. 



12 



THE HEW;*0»KvCLIPrER 



August 13, 1919 



CHICAGO NEWS 



FIVE THEATRIGAL 6> WdMEN WE 1 
ASK DIVORCE IN ONE DAY 




GOVERNMENT AGENTrRJUD -WW- 
OFFICES OF PLAY BROKER 



Irene William*, Evelyn La Rue, Grace De Winters, Qeo Day 

and Martha Batchelor Each Wants to Be Fr 
Other Cases Await TriaL 



J. Devaney and His Sister, Who Had Been Conducting Firm 
Under the Name of "Billie Jones," Arrested and Held 
in $5,000 Bail in Chicago 



While race riots were mt their height, 
acton' strikes holding attention end all 
sorts of unrest being had in the city, 
five actresses appeared in court in a single 
day here and demanded they be given a 
divorce decree ' immediately. All were 
represented by Attorney Leon A. Berer- 
niak. 

The first was Irene Williams, prima 
donna of the "You'll Like It" company, 
which went on the rocks in a single day 
at the Playhouse a few weeks ago. In 
private life Miss Williams is known as 
Mrs. Louis Gerard .Blame, wife of a 
wealthy eastern cabaret and hotel pro- 
prietor. She was married in New York 
City Dec. 21, 1915, and separated from 
her husband on Feb. 7, 1917. She charges 
"extreme and repeated cruelty." 

Next came Evelyn La Rue, formerly of 
"The Follies," whose divorce bill against 
John Joseph Coogan, - dancer, was heard 
by Judge O'Connor. Mrs. Coogan testi- 
fied that she was married July 26, 1917, 
after being wooed for two years. Twenty 
minutes after, the marriage, she alleges, 



her husband deserted her and joined the 
navy. 

Grace De Winters, the popular female 
ventriloquist, was the next to receive con-' 
hi deration. She sued her' actor-husband, 
James Francis Cormican, for divorce, 
charging 'him .with cruelty, intoxication 
and squandering 915,000' of her personal 
money. ." " 

Then came Cleo Day, charging John. 
Cyril Day, known on the stage as Jack 
Daily, with deserting her a year after 
their marriage in 1909. 

And hut, .but not least, came -Martha 
Batchelor, charging Alfred Batchelor with 
extreme cruelty and drunkenness. The 
act worked under the. team' name of 
Batchelor and Batchelor. They were mar- 
ried June 29, 1918, and separated March 
15, 1919. 

According to theatrical lawyers in Chi- 
cago, there are hundreds of other the- 
atrical divorces awaiting an opportunity 
to be presented to the 'courts. It is said 
that 1919 divorces will outnumber any 
three preceeding years 5 to L 



HOUSES ARE RE-OPENING 

Woods and Olympic Theatres have 
terminated their dark period and reopened 
Sunday night. "Up in Mabel's Room" 
was teen at Woods and Flake 0*Hara in 
"Down Limerick Way" had the honors" at 
the Olympic 

Chicago is promised a long list of new 
attractions, starting hereabouts on Aug. 
17, when "Take. It From Me," a musical 
comedy by Will B. Johnston and WQl K. 
Anderson, will open at the Studebaker. 
Zoe Barnett, Fred Hllderbrand, Alice Hflls, 
Douglas Levitt, Helen Bafferty, James 
Dysenforth, Ruth Lockwood, William Bal- 
four; Harry Burnham and the Gardiner 
Trio win fi in the cast. . 

On Aug. 21 "Three Wise TdoM," headed 

§r Claude GiUingwatef, Harry Davenport, 
oward Gould and Helen Menken, will 
make its appearance at Powers. «■. ,,-,,- 

Aug. 21 'wiU usher in "Seven Miles ,t» 
Arden." which will come to the Olympic 
Aug. .24, ''Sometime » 8,-mu/Hcal comedy 
production, will come to the Garrick. In 
its ca7t will biT Frank .Tinney, Ida May 
Chadwick, ' Oara Palmer, Mabel Ferry, 
Mildred Le Gue and De Haven and Niee. 
On Aug. 25 "On the Firing IJne" wfll 
open at the Blackstona Theatre,, with 
Laura Hopes Carew in the' leading" role. 

"Keep It to Yourself will come into the 
Princess Theatre, with Ethel Standard 
and Edwin Nicander in the east. 

"Listen Lester," with Gertrude Vander- 
bEt, wfll open -at the Illinois. 

Julia Sanderson and Joseph Oawthome 
will be seen at the Colonial in "The 
Canary," which wfll open at the Colonial 
Theatre on Sept. 7. 

Sept. 21 "Tea for Three" wiU be served 
at the La Salle Theatre, with Arthur' 
Byron, Frederick Perry and Elsa Ryan 
in the east. 



STRIKE CLOSED HOUSES RE-OPEN 

During the recent race riots all sou,th 
aide theatres were ordered closed by the 
military, and police. The theatres effected 
were those that laid in the rioting zone, 
which extended from the edge of the loop 
to 63rd and Halsted streets. The houses 
were permitted to open Saturday, follow- 
ing the withdrawal of the military forces 
from that area. 



STAR dr. GARTER OPENING READY 
The Star and Garter Theatre, the west 
side burlesque house, wfll open on August 
17 with its initial offering, .the Star and 
Garter Show. The theatre has been re- 
decorated and repainted and now makes a 
remarkable appearance. 

WALES WINTER'S BROTHER DIES 

Wales Winter was called away from his 
work last week, due to the death of his 
brother in New England. 



ACTOR'S CLUB RAISES *l,SOO 
fifteen hundred .['dollars was raised- at 
an actors', vaudeville show held at the 

Actors' Colony at Muskegon, Mich., last 
week. ' The money wfll he used to en- 
large the' colony Boat club. 

CIRCUS PARADE TIES UP TRAFFIC 

'.' The parade ^of ihe combined Ringling 
Brothers, Barnum and Bailey- Circuses, 
tied up traffic for Dearly two hours on 
Monday morning. .The parade, itself could 
not continue steadily, but was tied up 
several times, due to the jamming of/ traffic 
in the loop streets. . Otherwise, the,,para<le 
did nofc ,.eause ,,-any more, than the, usual 
amount 'of "excrement- *, ... ," '...'. 

REVUE OPENS, THIS, .WEEK [ 

Henry Brown's "Tip Top Revue" win be 
ready for presentation here next week. 
Brown has introduced a number of girl 
acta to this vicinity, his last success being 
"Over the Garden Watt." The act wfll be 
seen at- one of the outlying vaudeville 
theatres. ..,.- . 

FAGAN BENEFIT PROGRESSES 

Plans for the Barney Pagan testimonial 
at the Manhattan Opera House on Sunday, 
August. 31, progressed much last week. 
The performance will end with a dancing 
contest for professionals, a prominent 
firm donating gold and silver medals of 
value for the two best dancers. 

Among the artists and others who wfll 
appear are Raymond Hitchcock, Willie 
Collier. Mclntyre and Heath, Lew Dock- 
stadter, Louise. Dresser, Eddie Leonard, 
Ned Waybirn, Andrew Mack and Ziegfeld 
Follies Girls, Prank Sheridan, Burr Mc- 
intosh, George Wilson, Bert Williams, 
Julius P. Witmark, Ed. Marks, Harry Yon 
Tilzer, Irving Berlin, William Jerome, 
Nora Bayes, Willis P. Sweatnam, Hol- 
brook Blum, Marie Dressier, Louis Mann. 



Chicago, 111., Aug. 11. — Department of 
Justice agents, acting, under instructions 
of Assistant District Attorney Melroy, who 
is aiding -Ligon Johnson, of the- United 
Managers' Protective Association, raided 
the offices here. of J. Devaney, who had 
been conducting a play brokerage office, 
and arrested him and his sister. 

For many seasons past, play pirates. an 
over the country have been causing untold 
trouble to . owners . and brokers of stock 
plays, by misrepresentation and theft, and 
the arrest of Devaney and his sister- is the 
beginning of an extensive country-wide 
clean up. 

Devaney and his sister, the government 
officials say,' had been offering to stock pro- 
ducers such plays as "Seven Keys to Bald- 
pate," "The Girl of the Golden West,". and 
"Within the Law" for royalties of $3 a 
week. The charges made by the legitimate 
brokerage firms usually amount to $1,000 
per week. for the use -of these, plays, and 
the ridiculous' prices that Devaney asked 
aroused suspicion. 

Copies of Devauey's catalogs were then 



placed in the hands of Ligon Johnson, at- 
torney for the Protective Association, and 
he. immediately began an investigation, 
with the. .assistance of P. K. Hilliard, of 
the Department of Investigation, Depart- 
ment of Justice, and Assistant District At- 
torney Mflroy. Johnson discovered that 
Devaney had no right, to offer, any of the 
plays listed in his catalog' for lease, and 
that many, of .them, were alleged . thefts 
from original manuscripts which were the 
property of several of his clients. 

Accordingly, Hilliard arrested Devaney 
and his sister,- and they are being held in 
$5,000 ball awaiting trial on i a charge' of 
play piracy., 'Devaney's operations netted 
him a good sized little fortune and cost 
managers several thousands of dollars in 
loss of royalties. ■•' --.--. 

Prior to the -war,, nine play- pirates had 
been arrested, and. convicted, but the -war 
made it necessary to suspend operation* 
against them. Now, however, the managers 
have decided to resume their clean-up, and 
Devaney is the first. to be caught in their 
net.- • . '. •' ■-?. 



SHEA ENGAGES CAST 

P. F. Shea has signed the following 
people for - his stock company at Hoi - 
yoke, Mass.: Frank -Bond, leading man; 
Richard Morgan, juveniles; Eugene Shea, 
comedy; Walter Ayres, heavy; Alex Guin, 
general business; John Hamilton, the 
same,, and James Kennedy; also for gen- 
eral business. 

Emma Martin wfll be the .leading lady; 
Carlotta Irwin, ingenue; Augusta Durgon, 
second business; Emma, Ehrl Butt, second 
business. '■/._ •-. ' . 

The theatre is -being entirely renovated 
and the house wfll -open on- Labor Day, 
Sept. 1, with "On Trial" as the initial 

piece. • : , 

■ "■ "'I ' . :. .'r f '.'-'' 
ARREST ACTOR AFTER HOLD-UP 

Francis ;Fleming,' of Bridgeport, Conn., 
ah 'actor whose real name, the police say, - 
is Sheehan, was arrested Sunday morning 
at Forty -s&th street, .hear Broadway. He 
was . alleged to" have been/ runnii/g away 
from the. scene, of a hold-up in which Louis 
Mimho, auto supply dealer, of Forty-sixth 
street, was -the victim.' t ;! ?' * ; '. ■''- -• 

Patrolman Delaney, who : arrested Flem- 
ing, claimed that he had a bank-book 
showing deposits made in the name of 
Sheehan. He also said that, after he ar- 
rested the actor, Fleming bit him on the 
cheek. He was held in. $1,000 bail by 
Magistrate Frothvngham. 

JOINS DES MOINES CO. 
Eddie McHugh, who has just returned 
from France, where he served fourteen 
months, has been engaged for the Elbert 
and Getchell stock company at the Prin- 
cess Theatre, Des Moines, la., through the 
offices of Wales Winter. 



FIFTH AVE. CO. STARTS SEASON 

Brooklyn's stock season was started on 
Monday by the opening, of the Fifth. Ave- 
nue Theatre with "Bought and Paid. For" 
as its premier attraction. The Fifth 
Avenue Stock Company played- forty-six 
weeks last season, and will try to. beat 
the record this year. 

Mae Marvin arid W. 6. McWatters wiU. 
play the female and male leads, respect-, 
ively. Edwin Vail will again direct the 
company. -•-''.■ -■- - ...-.- 



; BA1NBRIDGE ENGAGES PEOPLE 

• .Minneapolis,- Minn., Aug. IL-^The Shu* 
bert Stock Company, of thhrcityl and St. 
Paul, under the management of A. G. Bain- 
bridge, has engaged the following- people, 
through the Packard Exchange, of New 
York : Grace Huff, leads ; Ivan Miller, 
leads; E. A. Turner, leads; A. J., Edwards, 
direj^OEfv.Gecil,! W. Secret, director; John 
Lyons, rccharncters ; Maurice Franklyn, 
heavies. -.The company will open August 
24th. : ,dt ,<■-; I " r :*1 > -d. 

'^r- ».,' •' . . '. • ' - -■;; iol 

PA YTON STOCK OPENS SEPT. 1^| 
Corse Payton intends to open with a 
stock company at the Crescent Theatre', 
Brooklyn, on Labor Day, playing "Nothing 
but the Truth." He will remain at that 
house until Jan. .1, playing on a percent- 
age arrangement with the Shuberts. It 
is likely that the '. Shuberts win switch 
attractions from the Majestic to .the 
Crescent shortly after the new. year. - : . 



■ REOPEN LABOR DAY 

German-town, Pa., Aug. 12.— The May 
Desmond Flayers, who played. here hut sea- 
son, wfll reopen at. the Orpheum Theatre 
here on Labor Day, aging either 'Teg 0* 
My Heart" or "Ponyana" as their opening 
vehicle. 



HORNE WITH PrrrSFrELD CO. 
Harry Home, who for the last year has 
been with the Harold Bavia Company in 
Halifax as stage director, is now with 
the Colonial Theatre Stock' Company at 
Pittsfield, Mass., in the same capacity." 
The company opens on Aug, 18 and will 
remain there till the winter season, when' 
it wiU move to Utica. 



OLLIE LOGSDEN TO RETIRE 
OUie Logsdon, who, about a year ago, 
was married, has rented her office and,, it 
is reported, is about to retire from the 
theatrical field permanently. 



DRISCOLL ENGAGING FOR CANADA 

George F.- DriscoU, of His -Majesty's 
Theatre, Montreal, is in New York engagf- 
ing people for companies to tour Canada 
in a repertoire of the latest plays. The 
enterprise is Canadian -as far as the 
finances go. - The names of players 'en-^ 
gaged have not been divulged. '' '; ;v: 



August 13, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




SHOWS OPEN dN 

PRELIMINARY 

TIME 



SEASON STARTS MONDAY 

' : Those shows on the Columbia and Amer- 
ican wheels which have preliminary time 
began opening their seasons ..last Satur- - 
day. The regular season of the Columbia 
Circuit starts next Monday, £ while iL the;: ■ 
American starts a week later, 'r Below 'will. - 
be found the shows that wffl start before,' 
their- regular season: ■ SJJT'SjS 

On the Columbia Circuit is Lew Kel- 
.ly's Show, which will open in Newburgh 
for three days, commencing Aug. 14; "The 
Liberty Girls'' opened in Peterson last 
Saturday night. The "Sightseers" opened 
•at Waldron's Casino, Boston, last Satur- 
. day and will play Waterbnry next week, 

before the regular season. The "Bowery , 
-Burlesquers" opened at Hurtig and Sea- 
mon's last Saturday night. Other shows 
I that opened last Saturday night were 
' "Social Maids," in Baltimore: Abe Rey- 
nolds Revue, in Washington; "Girls of the 
. U. 8. A.," in Pittsburgh; "Victory Belles," 
i in Cleveland, and the "BostonJans," in 
Buffalo. 
The "Million Dollar Dolls" opened Mon-- 
i day in Poughkeepsie for three days and 
will then jump into Dayton for its reg- 
ular opening next Sunday. The "Bon : 
. Tons" opened in . Newburgh Monday for 
three days and will go from there to CSn- 
! cinnati for the regular opening, next Sun- 
day. "Step Lively Girls" opened in Al- 
bany Monday. The "Twentieth Century 
Maids" opened in Toledo Sunday and the 
'•Golden Crooks" in Detroit the same day. 
j < Nearly all the American Burlesque Cir- 
cuit shows have preliminary time. The 
"Girls From Joyland" opened in Wilkes- 
' barre last Saturday and go to Scranton 
from there, and then on its regular time, 
opening the following Monday at the Star, . 
Brooklyn. The "Crackerjacks" open Sat- 
urday at the Star, Brooklyn. Edmond 
Hayes Show opens at Ne wburgh for three 
days, commencing the 21st. "Social 
: Follies" goes into the Howard, Boston, the 
week of the 18th. Other shows that open 
that date are Dixon's. "Big Review," in 
Newark, and the "Midnight Maidens," 
which opens at Binghamton for three days 
an<J n then goes to Niagara Falls, for. three 
more. . ( & . ! •?:''''*'•::'.'-• '-.'r-L- 

The show* that open- on Saturday night., 
arelhe "J^zz BabieB," ait the Olympic New, 
York ; the r 2Ba«ie Dazzle or? 1OTKV and 
Sliding BilbjhWatsoii at Toronto. "Round.. 
the. t Town'j-openH inHiTrenton on the 15^ 
. for two days and then goes to the Gayety^. 
Brooklyn, the following week. Thij,"Giilp 
From the Follies" opened last Saturday 
night in Baltimore and will be there all 
• this week. - It then goes on a week of one 
night ers through Pennsylvania. The "All 
' Jazz Revue" opens in Cleveland next Mon- 
day. The "Lid lifters" opened in Cleve- 
land last Saturday night and goes to De- 
troit next week. • 

"i'lThe following shows will open next Sun- 
■ day: The "Beauty Revue." at the Engle- 
Wood, Chicago; "Oh ; Frenchy*' in Milwaur 
kee; "Crown -Up Babies." in Sioux City;' 
. the "Cabaret Girls.", in St. Louis, and the 
"Broadway Belles," in Indianapolis. Pat 
White's Show opened in Milwaukee last 
Saturday, as did "The Monte Carlo Girls." 
"The Tempters" opened last Sunday in 
Detroit. The "Mischief Makers" opens in 
Niagara Falls Thursday for three days 
; and then plays a week of one nighters 
into St. Louis. The "French Frolics" 
• opened in Indianapolis on Monday.- They 
go to St. Louis' next week. Rube Bern- 
stein's "Follies of Pleasure" opened in 
Scranton last Saturday night and play 
there all' this week,, going into Wilkes - 
htirre next week, before the regular open- 



MeCAUjilf GIVEJUORFAaN* SHOW 
Jack McCauley, pi the Olympk/Theatre, 
gave tb<C5>rphans of the St-walichael's 
Home, on Staten Island, a big 'vaudeville 
show on the grounds of the home last 
week. He also gave each of the children 
a .. toy and a ' box of candy. McCauley 
gives an entertainment each year to the 
children of the Home, and has been doing 
it for the last eight summers. Those who 
appeared were Dan ' Coleman, Harry 
Steppe, Frank "Rags" Murphy, Charles 
Collins, Mitty Devere, Francis Reynolds, 
Ambark Ali and the Hudsons. 

SUTHERLAND CHANGES CREW . 

Several changes have been made by 
Manager Sutherland , of the Casino, Brook- 
lyn, in. the crew of hia house. Tom Yundt 

has been engaged as stage carpenter in 
place of Jack Hinchje, who has been at the 
house since it opened. Jack Leslie will be 
the new "doorman. 

Others who will return to their old posts 
are Howard Sloane, treasurer; Ben Harris, 
orchestra leader; James Brooks, property 
man, and Bob Steadman, electrician. 

WILL PLAY SPLIT WEEKS 

The shows of the Columbia Amusement 
Company will play a split week at New- 
burgh and Poughkeepsie, in place of Provi- 
dence, until a house in the latter city can 
be made ready for them. Harry Hast- 
ings' Big Show will be the first Columbia 
show to play the split and will open there 
on the regular, season; starting next Mon- . 
day, Aug. 18. ■ ,. 

; PLAYERS SIGN 
Hallie Dean has : been engaged by Bar- 
ney-Gerard as soubrette of the "Girls De 
Looks.'' Babe Healy has been. transferred 
to "Some Show." Stella Rose goes with 
Ben Welch as soubrette and Violet Buck- 
ley with "Beef Trust" Billy .Watson's 
''Parisian Whirt." All • were hooked 
through the office of Roehm and Richards. 

"GIRLS FROM FOLLIES" OPENS 
Baltimore, Md., Aug. ».— "Girla Prom 
The Follies" opened its season here at the 
Gayety, to-night, to capacity business. The 
show went over big. In the cast are Fred 
Binder. Harry O. Van, Larry Larribee, 
Ralph Rogers. Elsie Donnelly, Anna Arm- 
strong, Shirley Mellette and Theodore 
Murphy. 

HARRY WELCH REHEARSING 

Harry Welch has completed his con- . 
tract with the Idefl Film Company, and 
is now rehearsing With the "Follies of the 
Day," the show he^as with last season. 

He has been working all summer for the 
film concern at' Hudson Heights. '.• 

. GRANT 3 GOMG^WlttfiCERAJtiv. 

- John O. Grant, v^ho v was to have gone 
with "Oh My Dear,"' a Comstock and Gest 
show, was signed' late Monday afternorjn 
by Barney Gerard to handle -the- straight 
part in his "Some Show" company. He 
replaces John Williams, who was taken 

iTL. ' =M; 

GOING TO EUROPE - , 

"'" Minnetti and Sidelli have booked, pass- 
age to sail on the Celtic August 3D. They 
, : open in Paris for four weeks late- in Sep- 
tember. Their bookings, call them over 

' on the other side until 1921. 

HOWE SIGNS FLOYD 

. Walter C Floyd has been engaged' by 
Sam Howe as juvenile straight for ! his 
Columbia, Circuit show. He recently 
closed with Barney Williams' Show. ■•••- 

BABE WELLINGTON TO CLOSE 
Babe Wellington' wjll -Close: at Kahn's 
Union Square -Saturday night. She opens 
at. the National Winter Garden on Aug. 23. 



"NAME HOLDERS 

OF NATIONAL 

FRANCHISES 




ALSO GIVE TOWNS EN ROUTE 

General Manager Charles E. Barton, of 
the National Burlesque Circuit, stated last 
Saturday, that the circuit will Inaugurate 

'its first regular season on Monday, Sept. 
8, in the East and on Sunday, Sept. 7, in 
the West. . - - ., 

A list of franchise holders were given 
out at the same time, among them, being 
the names of T. W. Din kins. James Lake 
and Harry Hart, who had shows on the 
American Burlesque Circuit last season. 
Others are Tom Coyne, Louis Reals, Rich- 
ard Zeisler, Michelena Pennetti, Dan Gug- 
genheim, Louis Lessor, Ed Edmondson, 
James. A. James, Lou Sidman, Henry 
Goldenberg, Simon- Dr iesen , George A. 
Clark, Bert Li Mont, William Graham, 
Charles Clark, Joe Rose, Oscar Dane and 
Harold Hevia. " 

Instructions have been issued to all 
franchise holders that they must carry 
oitt a vigorous campaign of advertising 
both in the newspapers and on billboards. 
They must also carry advertising agents ,• 
with every show, and it was said at the 
office of the company that some of the 
shows will carry a second man. 

It was also said that in a number of 
the* houses a permanent chorus of .ten 
girls would be retained in addition to the 
sixteen carried by the companies. 

As an incentive to house managers, aa 
well as to show managers, the directors 
of the association have agreed. to offer, 
as a bonus to the ten shows and houses 
playing to the largest gross business on ' 
the season, a sum equal to 85 per cent, of 
the profits of the circuit. , ' 

Instructions have been issued by Gen- 
eral Manager Barton that the owners of 
shows must give clean entertainments. 
No dancers of any kind will be' allowed. 
'Managers must also equip their shows 
.'.'with everything new in the way of scen- 
. '. ery and costumes. A new system of cen- 
sorship will like wine be instituted which, 
it is hoped, will prove satisfactory and 
beneficial to the circuit and traveling 
managers. ■ Below is given a list of the 
cities in which the shows will play. 

Montreal, Schenectady, Troy, Rochester, 
Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, Mil- 
waukee, Chicago, Hammond, Gary, Ft. 
Wayne, St. Louis, Louisville, Cincin n ati, 
Columbus, Pittsburgh, one week one-night 
stands, Baltimore, Philadelphia, two - 
weeks, New York, Brooklyn, one week 
one-night stands, Boston. 

Schenectady and Troy will play three- 
night stands, and -Hammond, Gary and 
Fort Wayne will play two nights each. 
" Negotiations are now pending, it is said, 
with other houses and producers, so that 
by the time the season opens there will, 
undoubtedly, be additions to the circuit. 

GOING INTO BURLESQUE 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Evans, the latter- for- 
merly known as Dot McCraie, one of Mack 
Sennett's original bathing girls, bare 
signed with Sim Williams, and will be 
seen in burlesque this coming season. 

PERRY TO PRODUCE SHOWS 

Jack Perry has been engaged by the 
Minsky Brothers to produce the shows at 
the National Winter Garden this season. 
The house will re-open Saturday night, 
Aug. 23. 

FRANCIS TO CLOSE . 

James X. Francis will close at the Union 
Square Aug. 23 and open at the National 
Winter Garden the following week. 



BOOK "PEEfC -A -1 
.'a "Peek-a-Boo,'' which ft 
a'suscessfjUT^b at the Columbia all I 
mer and 'terminated at that house last 
Saturday night, moved across Broadway 
to the Central Theatre and opened there 
on- Monday. 

Arrangements were completed last Sat- 
urday morning with Bedini, Bobby North 
and Lee Shubert, through Sam A. Scribner, 
general manager 'C the Columbia Circuit, 
to place this show at the Central for a 
two weeks' engagement. .The house .had 
been dark for a week and the Shuberts 
did not' have an attraction to put fat';: • 
"Peek-a-Boo" has the same cast at the 
Central that it closed with at the Colum- 
bia, but there will be several changes when 
the show opens its regular season on the 
Columbia Circuit on August 31 at the 
Gayety. St. Louis. Abdalela and Gillette 
will replace' Clark ' and MeCullough, and 
Marie Sabot and George Brooks will re- 
place Emmy Barbier and Jim de Forest. 

"Peek-a-Boo" wifl only lose one week 
of its regular time on; the Columbia Circuit, 
as it was not to ope* until the week of -the 
twenty-fourth at the Gayety, St. Louis. 
This week will now be filled in by "Hello 
America," which will switch routes with 
the (Teek-a-Boo" show.. "Peek-a-Boo" will 
dose at the Central Saturday night, the 
twenty-third, and leave' New York the ;f al- 
lowing Tuesday for St. Louis to rehearse 
the new people for the opening. 
- This is the first time on record that a 
Columbia Amusement Company show has 
over Jumped 'direct .from the Columbia 
Theater! to a Broadway house and be rec- 
ognized aa such an important factor by 
Broadway; managers, j A number of years 
ago Gordan and North booked their bur- 
lesque show, "The Merry Whirl." at the 
-New York Theatre, but they did this in- 
dependently of the Columbia Company. 



■ ROSE SIGNING PEOPLE 
Law Rose, has signed, so far, for his 

stock company is New Orleans Ben Pierce, 
Eddie Miller, the Castle Trio, Jean Leonard 
and Mable LaMonia. Miss LaMonia will 
put on the numbers, while John Black 
has been engaged to produce the shows. 
They were all booked through Lou Kedeli- 
heimer. The company will open Septem- 
ber 13. 



MARION FILLS ROSTER 

The roster of the Dave Marion Show 
this season is Dave Marion. Babe La Tour, 
Sid Gold. La Prince and Kennedy, Eddie 
Gerard, Watson and Smith. Agnes Behler, 
Inez de Verdi* i* and Frankie Smart. Bob 
Travis will manage the show and Baron 
Nat Golden is going ahead. 

SOUBRETTE OPERATED ON *!. 

Gerry Fleming, soubrette of Charlie 
Robinson's "Periston Flirts," was unable 
to report for rehearsal of her show until 
the latter part of last week, due to the 
fact that. she had but recently been dis- 
charged from a Philadelphia hospital, 
where she was operated on. 

POWERS GOING TO JERSEY CITY 

Jimmy Powers has been engaged to man- 
age the Majestic Theatre, Jersey City, 
which the Columbia Amusement Company 
books. . He succeeds James Sutherland, 
who will manage the Casino, Brooklyn, this 



N, 



contmuJ on |»|« 33 



LAURA BIGGAR SETTLES 

Laura Bigger, now living in Los An- 
geles, is now free to return to the East, 
as her son has settled a judgment which 
has 'been held against, her for the last fif- 
teen years in the New Jersey courts. J. 
Willis McConnell, a son by her first mar- 
riage, has settled the $55,000 judgment 
which Mrs. Agnes M. Hendricks, of Brook- 
lyn, secured against Miss Biggar fifteen 
years ago for the alienation ' of her hus- 
band's affections. With interest, the 
judgment- amounted to •.* 100,000, but Mc- 
Connel settled with Mrs. Hendricks for 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13, 1919 



PUTSOV1R 
, ANOTHER ONE 

2£* * .-> 'it. ? itr Q 




PUTS OVER 
ANOTHER ONE fc 






.- ■, .. .. ; Li 






DON'T LOSE THE OPPORTUNITY TO HEAR 







■ '• .. • - ■ > : . 



AID 




DELIGHTFUL AND POWERFUL INTERPRETATION OF OUR 



LATEST SONG SUCCESS 






:■'.': /* 



■ 
' * ■ .' i ■ , . ■ :'■: 





(THAT CAME IN THE NIGHT) 



MUSIC BY ALBERT VON TILZER 



. • ••v.. ' jf '■"_ 



WORDS BY LEW BROWN AND EDDIE BUZZELL 



• .. : . - . ..: - 



: -.■'. ■* 



As sung by them in 

ZIEGFELDS FOLLIES 





'-■ -■:• 



* •- «■■ , 



: i^-^.' 






WE WOULD UKE TO OFFER THIS SONG TO YOU. AS THERE ARE UNDOUBTEDLY MANY 
SINGLES AND DOUBLE ACTS IN VAUDEVILLE WHO COULD USE THIS SONG TO ADVANTAGE 
H O W E VE R, WE A GREED TO RESTRICT THIS SONG FDR VAN * SCHENCX DURING THE 
NEW YORK RUN OF THE ZIEGFELD FOLLIES WHICH W1U £M> m SEPIEMBEK. WE 
i WILL BE GLAD TO ANNOUNCE THE DATE. OF ITS RELEASE LATER ON. 



;.-. ;:/>/.;- 















•- ,- . -: &?S 



vsyi 



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BROADWAY MUSIC CORPORATION 



• • | 



SU 37 South 9th St, WILL VON TILZER, President Calumet Bid*. Stale bb Thatn Bldg. 

BestMS Mrm. Ph5UddpbJ«, P.. 145 West 45th Street, New York City St LonU, Mo.- Chicago, n. 



August 13, 1919 



—.—l.^-. ..- . 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 





GOVERNMENT CA N STO P 
MUSIC PRICE CUTTING 



Trade Commiuion Which May Bo Ap- 
pealed to— Cas* Haa Power to Enid 
Unfair Methods of Competition 

The notice sent to the F. W. Woolworth 
Co. recently by , Maurice Goodman, attor- 
ney for the Music Publishers*. Protective 
Association, stating in general that unless 
the retailers stopped cutting the price of 
high priced musical publications to. the low 
popular price ' Oat an , appeal would be 
made to the Federal Trade Commission, 
has created much discussion in music pub- . 
lishing circles. While no statement has ' 
been made by the Woolworth Co. regarding 
its plans, it has been -stated among' pub- . 
Ushers that the price cutting is at an end. 
The Federal Trade Commission, accord- 
ing to a well-known attorney, has in cases 
of this nature, power to interfere, acting 
under section 5 of the act. " '"" 
: The Federal Trade Commission Act be- 
came effective, . on September 26, 1914. 
' Under section 5 of the act, it. is -provided, 
"that -unfair methods' ; of competition: in 
commerce are hereby declared' unlawful." 
This section gives considerable latitude, 
and many different kinds of acts have 
. been complained of. . For , example, in- 
fringing trade marks and labels, stifling 
competition by . undue sampling, by dis- 
tribution of gratuities, by maiding contri- 
butions to associations and conventions by 
excessive entertainments, etc. In the case 
of the Ward Baking Company, that con- 
cern was charged with stifling and sup- 
pressing competition in the' manufacture 
and sale of bread by supplying gratis to 
each customer in a certain locality, daily, 
a quantity of bread. daily bought and paid 
! for by each customer. - A hearing was had 
' and an order to cease and desist was en- 
tered. 
' A similar charge was made against E. J. 
Brach & Sons, who falsely advertised that 
' it was selling candy at cost and 1684 than 
j cost. An order to cease and desist was 
made. An isolated case of a 'sale of mer- 
- chandise below cost would not be contrary 
' .to law, but an effort, to destroy, competi- 
. tion by this unfair method doubtless 
. would be. 



NEW COPYRIGHT ACT PASSES 
The Nolan act, a bill for copyright pro- 
tection of American musical compositions 
and other works abroad has passed the 
House of Representatives and in the near 
future goes to the Senate where it is be- 
lieved it will speedily pass. 

There is- no 'opposition to the bill -and it 
will. doubtless soon become a law. Simual- 
taneous publication in foreign countries 
during the war period and for some time 
to come seems impossible, while a foreign 
publication will doubtless receive protection 
in this country due to the fact that Ameri- 
can industries were upset but to a small 
degree in comparison to those in the war' 
regions abroad. Shipping" conditions also 
figure largely in. upsetting calculations re- 
garding, the time "of publications and as a 
result there-are: doubtless many American 
publications that have not been copyrighted 
in other countries although the intent and 
work of the publishers has lived ' strictly 
up to the law. The new law gives copy- 
. right protection in all. countries that grant 
reciprocal rights, by complying with the 
coypright ] aw of the country in which the 
composition is published. England- haa 
promised similar privileges if America 
amends its copyright law to - cover this 
point and the act -will doubtless become a 
law in both countries in the near future. 



MUSIC MEN PLAN- BIG 
MOTION PICTURE CO 



"TAPS" LEAVING MUSIC HOUSE 



lo a din g Publishers Subscribe for Stock 
.fa New Company Which Will 
.. Soon Bo Incorporated 

A new' motion picture producing com- 
pany-owned and controlled by. music pub- 
lishers is -soon- to be formed' and aa soon 
as the .necessary legal stepa for incorpora- 
tion have been taken work upon .the first 
picture' will .'begin.'- . 

The idea of the company took root at 
a recent meeting- of prominent music men 
when during a lull in business conversation, 
one remarked^ upon the big business pros- 
pects of motion picture:, producing 'com- 
pany. He was asked to go into details and 
at the close of bis remarks a publisher 
suggested that a company backed by music 
men be formed. Here was a rush to sub- 
scribe for stock. One publisher said "put 
me down for a thousand," and his remark 
was the signal for everyone present to fol- 
low. Ten thousand dollars was subscribed 
in a few- 'minutes, and an attorney who 
«as present "was instructed to: put the mat- 
ter into legal shape. Other capital will 
doubtless be enlisted and the new company 
will be incorporated in the near future. 
The first . picture to be made is: from a 
. Cbas. K: Harris scenario called' ."It May 



CONFUCTINC TITLES BARRED 
Pending the formation of a registry 
bureau- or the adoption of some means to 
prevent the duplication of song titles one 
of the big phonograph companies has made 
a rule to- reproduce no numbers of like 
titles. 

This ruling has held up the phonographic 
reproduction of several recent publications 
and irrespective of the priority of titles or 
the legal right of the- respective publishers, 
a lot of money is being lost. 

Song - title-' duplication is always, un- 
fortunate -and the result usually, is that 
each publisher loses lit the transaction,. and 
practically every house has expressed a. de- 
sire for some means to prevent it. Up to 
the present no solution has been received 
"bnt the ruling of the "phonograph company 
will doubtless reeult in some definite action. 



"Taps," toe; manager of. the band and jflEpprt -To Ton," a piece- which has al- 



orchestra department of the McCarthy & 
Fisher Co. is leaving his post in the music 
house. "Taps" has been with the firm 
since it began -business and is known to. 
everyone by. his nickname. . ,' He of course 
was regularly christened- something else, but 
the name is so long and peculiar that no 
one around the McCarthy & Fisher place, 
with the exception of the young lady that 
makes up the payroll knows what it really 
la and she can't pronounce it. 



ready been read and favorably commented 
upon by a number of the big producers. 



ARNOLD WRITES "THE LAST KING" 

Maurice Arnold, whose plantation dances 
have recently been featured, by .the Russian 
Synphony orchestra," has composed-an opera 
called "The Last King." The story sym- 
bolizes the conflict between royalty and the 
democratic ideal, while the .music fre- 
quently suggests the patriotic melodies of 
France and America." "1 "-'- ,-."-- 

■■ ■ n '; ■" 



FAXON WINS SILVER CUP 

Tom Faxon, a Chicago singer won the 
silver cup at the Green Mill Garden's song 
contest held recently defeating' tile repre- 
sentatives from four' music publishing 
houses. The song which he successfully 
featured was "When You Look In The 
Heart of A Rose." is SjP - 



ARRANGERS ORGANIZING 

The music arrangers, the men who sup- 
ply- the orchestra parts for the popular 
songs held a meeting last week with the 
idea of forming a union and establishing 
a standard price for the making of an 
. orchestration 'or transposition. In line 
with .practically all other labor or artist 
combinations the music men are consider- 
ing a big raise in the rates for music adap- 
tation. If successful it will mean still 
another boost in the price of sheet music 
production. . \ . y 

HENRY GETS BIG STATEMENT 

-' S. R. Henry, the composer, received his 
royalty statement from Jos. W. Stern & 
Co. last week- and the figures representing 
the sales of ' "Indianola," "Tears of Love," 
"Kentuck Dream," "Pajamah" and "Hima- 
laya" were remarkable. D. Onivaa and 
Frank H. Warren. Mr. Henry's collabora- 
tors, shared in the -big royalty distribution. 



LEWIS RETURNS TO CHICAGO 

Eddie Lewis, of the Harry Von Tilzer 
Co. returned this week to Chicago where he 
will resume charge of- the Western office of 
bis company. Lewis has been in the east 
for the past month placing tile Von Tilzer 
songs in burlesque shows. 



STERLING BUYS A HOME 

Andrew Sterling, the 'lyric writer re- 
ceived his royalty check from the Harry 
Von Tilzer Co. on Monday of last week and 
the following day purchased a home - in 
Stamford, Conn. 



GILBERT IN BALTIMORE 

L. Wolfe' Gilbert, appeared in' the Loew 
house in Baltimore last week singing a 
number of his old and new songs. He du- 
plicated his success of the week before St 
the New York American, scoring one of 
the bits of the big bffl. " 

CARUS TO FEATURE OWN SONG 

Emma Cams, who plans to resume her 
vaudeville tour, early next month will fea- 
ture her own' song' "Oh How She Can 
Dance," a. number which scored strongly 
for her during her recent engagement in 
the New York houses. 



MUSIC MAN SUED FOR $100,000 

- William Webber, a j son of the j wealthy 
widow of the late Richard Webber, who 
is connected with the Knickerbocker Har- 
mony Studios of 1545 Broadway, has been 
sued by Seth B. Baugham, of Washington, 
D. C, for $100,000. ' ' 

It is alleged that, the defendant made a . 
deliberate and successful ' attempt to, ali- 
enate Baugham's wife, while he was with 
the American, Army in France... 

Baugham states that he was married in 
May, 1918, and that during the period be- 
tween 'January and July of this'year Web 1 
ber deliberately and intentionally contrived 
and succeeded ". in destroying his wife's af- 
fections. " '"' " 

In addition, to his salary from the 
- Knickerbocker Studios, Webber is said to 
enjoy an income of $1,000 a week from his 
mother. He was recently employed as a 
"dollar a- year" man by- the zofemmeit and 
is married. • n ''r" • ff% i" ' 

His wife is said to live at Biverside 
Drive and One ..Hundred and Twelfth 
street, while he has an apartment in West 
Eighty-sixth street- Until the night of 
July 28th, he also bad a room on West End 
avenue and according to Lucille Pugh, at- 
torney for Mr. Baugham a spectacular raid 
was made on the place .at midnight of 
July 25th. As a result of the raid Mrs. 
Baagbmah was served with a summons and 
a suit against her filed in the Supreme 
Court, and Webber is also named in this 
action. " 



MUSIC MEN PLAN OUTING 

The 'annual outing and shore dinner of 
the Greater New York Music Publishers' 
and Dealers* Association is to be held - at 
Massapequa Inn, I. I., on Tuesday, August 
' 19th; Maurice Richmond, chairman of 
the entertainment committee, haa arranged 
a tig day for the music men which will 
commence at lO a. IT. vjhen they wilt meet 
at Ditson's on 34th street, and make the 
trip by auto to the sea shore resort , 



• TTERNEY IN AUTO SMASH UP 

Harry Tierney. the composer, is nursing 
a badly damaged knee, a sprained wrist 
and numerous' other cuts and bruises as a 
result of an automobile accident. 



CLARKE BACK WITH FEIST 

Grant Clarke, the lyric writer who 
changes publishers nearly as often as a 
new- phase of the moon appears is back 
with "theTed Feint house. .■'"'.-''■"■ 



1 FEIST BUYS "GOLDEN GATE" 

Leo Feist, 'Inc. has secured the publica- 
tion rights of. "Golden Gate" from the 
Kendis-Brockman Music Co; The song, a 
high priced publication although but a few 
weeks old is one of the country's biggest 
hits. Edgar 'Bitner, manager of the Feist 
bouse, secured the song on Wednesday and 
by Thursday night has booked orders for 
100,000 copies from local jobbing houses. 



BDWY. SONG SCORES IN "FOLLIES" 
The new Broadway Music Co's.' ' song 
"Sweet Kisses? which is being featured In 
the Ziegfield "Follies" by Van and Schenck 
has scored one of the big hits in the sum- 
mer show. The song will be released to 
the singing profession at the end of the 
"Follies"- New York run early in Sep- 
tember. 



' " - ; - VON TILZER SONG SCORES 

"Carolina Sunshine,*'" a -recent publica- 
tion in the Harry Von Tilzer catalogue haa 
scored one of the quickest successes -on 
record. Although but a few weeks old it 
ie being featured in scores of acts and: is 
also an exceptionally big seller. 



. BIG OFFER FOR "SUNBEAM" ",, 

The : Frank. Gillen Music Co. refused a ;}'? 
'big cash offer last week for the new num- ">• 
ber "Sunbeam." This is the feature num- 
ber in .the catalogue and according to its 
publishers' is to be retained. 



"SMILES" HITS 3.000,000 MARK 
"Smiles," Lee Robert's big song and in- 
strumental hit has hit the 3,000.000 sales 
mark and. is still going big. "Till We 
Meet Again." another number in the 
Remick catalogue has also hit this mark, 
but will net the Remick concern a much 
greater profit as it sells st the high price 
and in money amounts to almost three 
times as great a jam. 



MONACO NOW FREE LANCING 

James V. Monaco, who- for the past year 
has been connected with the McCarthy & 
Fisher Co.. is now a free lance writer and 
L< placing songs with a number of the 
popular Infuses. ■-':• 



WITMARK GETS FAIRMAN NUMBERS 
M. Witmai-k & Sons have taken oyer the 
publication rights of two George Faiirman 
numbers. They sre "Frisco's Kitchen 
Stove*; rag and "Bo-La-Bo." 



NEW COHEN SONG FEATURED . 

. Russel and Frey, who have just received 
a route over, the B. F. Keith time are 
featuring the new Meyer Cohen song "If 
I Only Had You." __ . Z % lA 



TAYLOR COMING TO NEW YORK 

Tell Taylor, the Chicago music publisher 
is moving his office to New York and la 
now on the lookout for a suitable location. 



RUTH ROYE SINGS NOVELTY 

Ruth Roye is singing the new Chaa. K. 
Harris novelty "When The Lotus Flowers 
Bloom in China Land." 



ELLERT WITH G. SCHIRMER CHANGE TITLE OF PLAY 

Lawrence B. Ellbert, for several years "The Girl in the Limousine" is the title 

connected with the New York office of the selected by A. H. Noods- for the play 

R, F. Wood Co. of Boston is now with the hitherto called "Naughty Love Birds'," by 

G. Sch inner house. Wilson Collison and Avery Hop wood. 



TURNER IN ST. PAUL STOCK 

E. A. Turner has signed an equity 
contract to appear in the St. Paul and 
Minneapolis 'stock" company as leading 
man. He will open Aug. 24. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



'--*■ .'- - : : 



: August 13, 1919 







Vhat Sterling Means to Silver, 
Vhaf Virgin' Means to Gold, 
What 'ILg-A: Means to A 5ondL, 
Vhat 'liegfeld' Means to A Frolic, 
Vhat *Keif5' Means to A \fode Shew 

This Mark Means To A Song 




■ 



DO YOU LOOK FOR THIS MARK? 

When you're reading a professional copy? It is the insignia that identifies the product of the 
"Man Who Knows" about songs— about music — who knows values — what it takes to make a 
hit!-! 







It COSTS NOTHING! 



,M. 



the publishers who are committed to a policy of courteous— intelligent— effective 
attention to the wants of those using songs and music. 

SELECT ANY ONE OR MORE! 

of the names below — state your requirements. If the one you select hasn't just what you need, 
he'll tell you who has, and where to get it. 



air 



Irving Berlin 

■ 4: Broadway Mask 
" Corporation 

Buckeye Music 
Company 

C C Church 

Meyer Cohen 
Music Company 

Daniels & Wilson 

Leo Feist. 



•: IS 



^;^C;iArllnirFnV 

Music Company 

-i Sam Fox Publishing 
Company »• 

Gilbert & Friedland 

Chas. K. Harris 



• Music Company 

McCarthy & Fisher 

McKinley Music 
Company - 






Joe Morris Musk 

^v;;:,'Conjp»iiy ; 

Pace and Handy j 
AlPiantadosi 

Jerome H. Remick 

Maurice Richmond 
Musk Company 

■ 'A\i'.& ^-K-V? '■ r ":":-v^ '.J ' ' '■ !'■'■''■ 

• Shapiro, Bernstein 
and Company 



.:iHf ' 
•H 



-..,a-- 



Sherman, Clay 
and Company 

: '?c ~ ; i»: j J. Stasny ^ 
and Company 

;iJcs;.m;st«rii^: 

and Company 



Harry Von Tiher^::^ 

Waterson, Berlin & Snyder 
M. Witmarh & Sons 



ORCHESTRA 
LEADERS 



WRITE ANY OF THE 
ABOVE FOR THE LATE 
REAL HITS 



1 






August 13, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CUPPER 



17 



stock and Gest. 



by Com- 



Marie Kellar is replacing Miss Barry in 
Stan Stanley's act;-''-.' ■"•■■- '. •" ■?*.£" s3?S3&. •' -', 

*■*' %' : -i — — .'. : .- '■-.:•■'■- ■■ ••.'.■'■ 

Tom Jones ant away on his vacation 

Friday to Wnlte^ake. 3*- 

S. Morgan-^feH, the Canadian' dra- 
in at io critic, is in the city. < / 

Basis. Dean has dosed with tha Cutter 
stock, and ia in New Yorki - ir C'; 

John Halliday has signed with the Shu- 
berts to appear in fThe Dancer." * - " :' 

Irene Albeasca, the toe-dancer, is spend- 
ing a vacation in the mountains. V* 

George Chaos is at Saratoga watching 

the form of his filly, Eastern Glow,. \ 



ABOUT YOU! AND YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



Frank Huyfcr has been engaged by 
Chauncey Olco^t s 



Kkw and Erlanger for 

revival of "Macushla." ■• 



Jacushla." <flk 
oolgy returned t 



% 



Harold X. Feck has . returned /from 
' Fr ance a fter two years' service with the 
A..' E^fc. M&& 



Wallace McCutcbeon, who recently re- 
turned from France a» a Major in the 
'British Army,: has been engaged to play , 
• a leading role in one ■ of ' tha forthcoming 
Schenk-Firat National Pictures with Ccm- 
stanco Talmadge. .••....-•'„•..: . . ' 



William Doolgy return e J to the cas^frf 
"Monte Cr is to, Jr.," last week, after a 
vacation at Lake Placid.; 



; Ethel X Lockwood, actress, secured a 
divorce last week from Benoni Loekwood 

in the White Plains Court. 



Leahy Bros, are • 

ers' Minstrels doing 



i the De Rue Broth- 
ring specialty. 



tag If or 



Williams is handling the book- 
Thos, who is on the coast. 



Win Morriasey has been: added to the 

cast of "The Greenwich Village Follies." 



i Mart ine's act known as 



s joi 
"Boi 



ng Shopping.'' 



Emma Lamed' is in Midwood Hospital, 
Brooklyn to undergo a minor operation. 

• '•■ ■ i'>.''.',u '- ■' '■'■ ^d' P V ■'•'■ '-. 

Helen GDI is' -in the Presbyterian Hos- 
pital in Philadelphia, with appendicitis. 

''"■.^ ■■^'i::'~l : r . '■ ' - ".•.'-"' 

Guy Rawson was operated on last week, 
at Stem's Sanitarium for internal trouble. 

Efflington Pinto has been engaged. to . 
appear in- "The Dancer," a new Shubert 
•how. . : ' ■':'-' , "'.-•.,■, ■ ■ ■.••■•■■ 

John Squire la a new addition to the 

cast of "Monte Crist o, Jr.," at the Winter 

Garden.-. ■> ' ". ■ '■ '. 



Hakalif, formerly with ' the 

Russian Ballet, opened Monday in the 
"Greenwich Village Follies." 

Joso Ruben, formerly with Mary Nash 
■lin.-Tr O.U.," has been engaged for the 
leading role in "The Dancer." 
« i 

H. D. Zarrow, who has just routed six 
tabloid acts over the Sun time, is coming 
East with several new girl acts. 

Mme Burnell has fully recovered from 

her recent illness and has left the Ameri- 
can Theatrical Hospital, Chicago. 

Jay J. Mulrey, who plays the juvenile 
roles with the May Desmond Players, is 
at Saratoga, enjoying a vacation. 

Nina- Davis has returned to Chicago, 
after playing sixteen consecutive weeks 
for the W.-.V. M. A. on the coast. ... 



Adele Ardsley has been added to the 
cast of George White's "Scandals" at the 

liberty.; ..-.; . ■-.. ".'"'".'.. u . ■""•i f ';/ 

Ned Homes has gone West to manage 
the' fifteen- week theatrical tour of Jack 
' DempseyV' ' ..' ';'- , M. :' .:/•.'.'"■'..''. '.'.^ .. ••' 

Josephine Sabel has been engaged by 
Gus Hill as prima donna in one of his 

productions: . ;.. •■ ij-? '*''.-'i~\ ■ ■ 

la Gygl has purchased a Ronat u a . Sera- 
phim violin for $9,500, and insured it for 

a large sunt -vVw/S*' 

LeWfS Hooper, Stage director, has been 
discharged from the. service,. and is, back 
on Broadway.' '. ;"!.!' .." •' .. ' /*' ■ •'■ " ■ 

Georgia Hall has been, engaged hyaBay- 

mohd -'- Hitchcock . for' . the- new edit»n of 
"ffitchy-Xoo:". ''_':'.•''•_ '.SrT|TtVv- ttril. -•• 

Perdval Keniers has signed with the 
Shuberts to appear In ^those Who Walk 
ta Darkness,"- . -^ ■>".- "■■■'. 



Billy Abbot has been signed. to feature 
with ■.-- Saranoff in Herman Simberg'a 

Violin Girls." '•.:'. i : ' " ^ 

Jolin M. Liddy locked his desk at the 

N. V. A. on Monday and started on a two 
weeks' .vacation. ? ' " "' V . . '' .: 

Eddie Toyer ' is .recovering' .from, an 
operation on Lis eye at the New York Eye 
and Ear. Hospital. ; . . ^" 

Mabel Semens is recovering from a seri- 
out operation at the American .Theatrical 
Hospital, Chicago. '.■•-. ' .,•;; .'"'■.''. 



Edward Emery was engaged, last week 
by Thomas Dixon to take' the place of 
Louis Lvtton in "The Red Dawn." 

Dahl and -Walling started a tour of the 
Loew houses this week, opening at At- 
lanta, Ga., in their act, "Promotion." 

■ '. Charles ComptOn has left the musical 
comedy stage, to be leading man in a new 
comedy to be produced by John Cort. 

. Vivian Holt and Lillian Rosedale have 
been engaged by 'the Shuberts for "Hello, ' 
Alexander, with Mclntyre and Heath 

William T. Ryan was discharged from 
.the 2d Division last week, and will re- 
turn as superintendent of the Colonial. 

■%,.£ - ■ '■• . • . . • ■ . 

Lee Cope land, . syncopated singer and 
composer, is in the London - Music HaHa, 
where he recently began an engagement. 

Vivian Holt, of the "Hello, Alexander," 

company, was one of the singers who ap- 
peared at the Stadium last Sunday night. 

Ruby Norton and Andrew Tombea are 
to be starred in ''NothineBut Love," the 
new (jharley.Maddock untax Hart play. 

5* Irene Fenwick- was' operated upon for 

appendicitis lastrrweelc, atfb is^ doj* well 
at her home at Long Beach, Long Island. 

. Carol Dixon has completely, recovered 
from an operation performed upon her at 
the American Theatrical Hospital, Chicago. 

The Exposition Jubilee Four has been 
booked • over the Loew and Western 
Vaudeville time for .the remainder of the 

yesx..\;.\,;' 

. George A. Bovyer is business manager 
in advance of "The Shepherd .of the 
Hi 11»," a motion picture touring Cali- 
fornia. 



Haley, and Mcintosh returned from 
France last week, where they had been en- 
tertaining soldiers. . '.. 



Mabel Manrel and Millie Freeman have 
been added to the east of ( "Those Who 
Walk-in Darkness* ■-,>• 



Irving GrosanUh and L. Kai#iwo wTn-' 
known Yiddish actors on the coast, have 
organized a Yiddish stock company) in 
San Francisco'. . •'."'.- -•< 



Doris Sustmsn, secretary . to Samuel 
Bearwitz, is on a vacation. She will visit 
Clinton and Cleveland, Ohio, Chicago, HL, 
and Pittsburgh -v. 

Edna French, formerly one of Mack 
Bennett's bathing beauties, is now. with 
the "Ziegfeld Follies" at the New Am- 
sterdam Theatre. S \ 

William Wolff, last season with "Furs 
' and Frills," will be in advance of Fred- 
erick V.- Bowers in "Kiss Me Again" for 
the coming. season. V. 



:. Frank A. Vardon, of Vardon and Perry, 
who has just been discharged from the 
Overseas Theatrical League, is in Denver 
visiting his mother. 



. Loring Smith did not open on the Proc- 
tor Circuit. last week as he was signed 
for the leading role in "The Little Cot- 
tage" by George Choos. -\ . 

Dick Hahn, formerly of the team of 
Hahn and Owens, is' rehearsing with a 
vaudeville act -called "Cairo," in which' be 

is to be featured shortly. .. - • 



Schuyler Lsdd has returned from over- 
seas, where he has been serving for two 
years. He was the head of his own com- 
pany of players over there. -. 

Mrs,.' JVC. Drum, who has handled the 
press work at Luna Park, Cuney Island, 
all summer, is now doing the same for the 
."Greenwich Village- Folfles." 

..-•:' . .. .' # 

Louis King, of Ziska and King, suffered 
a nervous breakdown 'last week and- was 
forced to quit. Be was sent to Saranac 
JLake. for a two months' rest. 



Sam S. Sahmau and Frank J. Morris 
have'a>pyrighted.'and registered thJdE new 
act, "The A Safe Blowers," which they will 
present in .vaudeville shortly. - ,f» ) -"' 

Harry Webb, formerly of Webb and 
Burns, an^ now working .with Tony Mar- 
tin, la a candidate for Alderman in the 
Ghetto dn^trict IniNew Vorkrl 

Ben Lowjehas been made treasurer of 

the Princess Theatre, Chieofifd.'iLowis has 
been advance .man for "Broken Blossoms" 
and "The Unpardonable Sin." 



.Kate Pullman, last season with the Rose 
Sydell London Belles Company, will open 
with Eddie. Leonard in Baltimore on 

Sept. 8. ' 

Tommy Harvey, who was seen with the 
Billy Bounce act last season, ha* retired 
to accept - a position as an automobile 



Jane Ante and Virginia FoXttwo of the 
Mack Sennett Beauties now appearing at 
B. S. Moss's Broadway Theatre, sailed over 
New York last Sunday in an aeroplane. 

Shepard and Ott open their season at 
Atlanta, Ga-, next week for a complete 
t our of the Loew Cbenlt. The name of 
their act ia "A Little of This and That. 1 * 

Lillian Goldsmith, of the team of Her- 
bert and Goldsmith, will head the east of 
"The Spider and the Fry," a Gus Hill pro- 
duction, scheduled to open on Labor Day. 



, . Sergt. Charles If.; Hemp has been mus- 
tered birt last week after 13 months- over- 
seas an directrrr of the Tj. 8. A. Ambulance 
.Tarj Band. 



it, is being 
with there- 



Wjflsos Misnet, the,'] 
heM under_baU ineejJDe 
cent gambKg ,TsjPefe' Nassau Comity, in ' 
which he is accused' of having helped the 
gamblers to e»cape. 

Alfred Head ha* boan appointed general 

press representative by David Belasco. He , 

had been dramatic Critic for the Herald 

and resicned from that pu b li c ati o n to ac- . 

cept Belasco's offer. 
; ..>; .■-*■.-'-.'.. ' '. t*H : "* ' 

• ; .;--^ ■ • £Sj — : — 

Edward A Mitchell has been made man- 
ager of the Decatur Posting Service, of 
Decatur, 111. Be has hitherto been con- 
nected with' the Milburn-Hobson Poster 
Advertising Company. ' ' , ' 

Frank Belmnat, formerly seen in "The 
Yellow Peril," u now featuring Maris 
Stoekweu in a new act called "Salvation | 
Molly," which has been routed over the j 

Loew and Pantagea time. 

.. ...... «; m ^^ 

. Philip Dunning, who staged a musical 
revue for President Wilson on board tits 
George' Washington, has been engaged to . 
appear in "The Dancer" and also as stage 
manager by the Shuberts. 

Winonah H. Wile, formerly a Winter 
Garden chorus girl, who •married Stanley 
Wile,' a bureau clerk in the Navy, believ- 
ing him to be an officer, has obtained an 

annulment of tie marriage. 

Letter Fountain, who managed the Hip- ': 
podromes in Los Angeles, San Jose, Port- 
land and Fresno, when they opened,- will . '. 
manage the Hippodrome in Salt Lake City - 
when it opens in September. 

Lucille Tagats'a. mother, Mrs. Grace I 
Tagatx, has been operated upon at the 
American llheatrieal Hospital, Chicigo, 
and . is improving. Lucille Tagats 5 a - i 

member of the La Salle Stock Company. \ 

Stella Bernard, Barney Bernard's young- j 
est sister, hut week married In Bernstein, 
of Richmond, Vs. Bernstein was formerly 
a sergeant in the Eightieth division and 
'was wounded during the Meuse-Argoane 
drive. ~ 



Elisabeth Brloa. and Will Morriseey 
were married in Hoboken hut week. The 
bride, now appearing in the Overseas Re- 
vue in vaudeville, was formerly in the 
"Follies." ' '- : - 



Mr. and Mr*. Theodore Doncet are the 
parents of - a son, . bom last week. ■ ■ The 
mother was formerly a member 'of the - 
Greenwich Village Flayers and was 
in "Hobohemia." : : ' /: 




John McDonald, formerly basso of the 
Boston Grand Opera, and Frank DiOraen, 
tenor, 'Who haVJust returned from yrsaoe, 
have been engaged for John Greevs*s 
"Allie's Safety Pin," a vaudeville set, 
Pauline Carr win sing the contralto role. 

Chic Sale, Ralph Hers, Willie Solar, 
Penn Four, Lew Cooper, Jamesr Thornton, 
Lenta Hoffman, JunVBaUew, the ~ 

Preda Leonard, MJe. Margnerit* 

Vyne and Cross were among those I 
appeared, it the Winter Garden 
Sunday night.. 

Guy Bolton and P. O. Woodbouee, au- 
thors of the book of "The Flower of 
Cathay," have returned from their vaca- 
tion at Haines Fails, where they put the 
finishing touches on the musical produc- 
tion, which will be presented by Corn- 
stock and Oest 

Arthur Ryan, Howard Herrick and 
. Joeefh Vton have been engaged by J. J. 
McCarthy and Theodore Mitchell for the 
business staff of the Vatican Choir. The 
first two will go in advance of the choir 
and Vion, with another party to be en- 
gaged, will act as business managers and 
navel with the company. 

AL Dutta, a lyricist of the .Witmark 
forces, who was with the 8eventv-ssventh 
Division oversea*, ia now awaiting dis- 
charge in a casual . company at Camp 
Merritt; and expeeta to receive his red 
chevron lata .this week. Dttbia has been 
at an army hospital at Merritt eonvalese- 
ing from' tha effects of German gas. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13, 1919 







Your Copy and 
Orchestrations Are Ready 



a .. "-ft'*** 



Required 
Befo 



Using 



CHICAGO 
nd Opera. House BuiMi 

boston 

I SI Tremont Street 

PHILADELPHIA 

Globe Theatre Buuc3i;i^ 

NEW ORLEANS 
115 L*ntTer«tv Place 



LEO. FEIST, Inc 



711 Seventh Avenue, New Yorl 



...-•: ' ;" — 77 — rr- 



ST.. LOUIS' 

luiiiet -Buildi 



CLEVELAND. Ellastone Bid*. 
BUFFALO,- 4S5 .Mail St. 
PITTSBURGH. 311 Sekmiat Bldg. 



DETROIT. 213 Woodward A«. 
KANSAS CITY, 1125 Grand Ave. 
LOS ANGELES. 836 San Fernando Bldg. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

". Panta^es. Theatre Buiidin™ 
MINNEAPOLIS 

Lyric -Tncatre But lain *j 

SEATTLE 
301 CHickennff Hall 



IS 



August 13, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



B. F. KETTH VAUDE. EXCHANGE 

Talane TlminT TTtutt- TV B S. Nary 
Club— Lew Doesstader— Sjlrla J aeon and William 
lleig (Four tp flU.) -•.".- .. l^. "'■ 
. HM- BylTester ft Yaneo— Helen 
-Moaeoa* Br™. — Bolnod Trn' 
i Oo, _ 

" A BettmsS-Al 





STx*« 



Wart & GlrU 

Mmk- o*o. 



VII 
j Tmceo — Will J, 
— O'Nell * Kellar— Bryoo * 

Kelley A Co. — Royal GucolfnfS. 

Vancouver. 

OTphoani fcih Clayton A Co. — "Current of 
ran"— Blanche A Jimmy Crelgbtoo — Caetlng 
Wudt-Hudn A Kreclle— Harmon A McManus— 
XambarU. 



| BROOKLYN, at. TV':' 

Buahwick— Craig Campbell— Halloa A 
Arnault Broa.— Dorothy Seboemaker Co, . ■ 

Orpaauaa— Venlta Gould. ' 

Henderson— Bert ntxxlbbon — O'Neill A Keller— 
Ryan ft Healey— Arthur HOL _ ' • J- ..." 

Haw Brighton— CreUe Fashion Hate— I* Grobs— 
Leo Donnelly — Belle Baker — Marconi ft Fltsa^boon. 

Reckaway — Morrieona— Henry Lctrla— Nan Hal- 
pern — Jaa. Locaa. • '• " "•o 

BALTIMORE MD. >Orne»sna*— landlord ft Frederick*— Ted Doner— 

nii:iia<>i>, ~*V • -• ^v - Dunham A O'Malley— Bay 8now— Tbe Seebaeke— 

ataryiand-Fallon ft Brown-Jennl. iMiftUetnn— Soa^Klux ft Co~^ 
Lew Hawklna— Mary Maxneld— Valentin* ft Bell— «*°«» *•"»- " J~ ■ 
Montgomery ft Allen— Leona LeMar— Wlntno Broa. PROCTOR'S CIRCUIT 

• BomcoH. vni Mint u-w. 

jTsita'a— Josephine A Hennlnga— Maaon Keeiex 1TEW TOHX OITT. 

C-ja Oota-Prtmreae Four. «tk ATaaas^Patsy Doyle-BUck ft Wnlte- 

. BUFFALO. BJ. A Lot Ford— Greenlee A Drayton— Green A 

ghea't-Dkwaon Sisters A Btem— "Man Hunt"— Myra— ArtDeafon— "i^cat-" • _._. 

AiMaldeBell Oo *»rd. Streat—Hsxry Breen— Saxton A Facial— 

Bart Earle ft Girls— Herloo A Malay— "Girt in 
. the All"— Sne Smith— Hale Schuyler. 

• s»tn Street— Hampton * piake— Turner ft Grace 



Paul Brady— Smith A 
Flatal ft Onanlmf-- 1 ' 



Tobin — Tern A 
aealand Naval Eight. 



— Keating A Walton. (Last _ Half)— Wyoming 

Trio— •oar Family-*— Ta* Bbamrka Welaa Leaei 

Wallln THo. , .' .; . .-. 

. UULU1H, M1BR. 

>tw Orasat (rirat Half >— Three Kings at Har- 

- mony— "When ,We Grow Co" — Christy A Lloyd — 

. B*jon Clicu, '.(Latt HaiH— Sherman A B oa t- 

~- raiTo tat Couttar— Steed* Eyncopatedn. Sextette— 

HJjklUJaek ftdBeoi 



■'■ 1 



Scorg a C any Han Wna Troop*. 

. W AUKEE, WB. 
Palace < Hut Half)— Marlctte't ataoikjna— Ylr- 

(lala BeDea— Clay Croucb — Plpifax A Accomplice. 



Co.— 



CLiVLLAST). 
Hifpo.— Ed Duo— '^Md Time Darkles." 

DETROIT, 
Tamule— Era Shirley Jaxa Band— Henry A Moors 
— Herbert Threa— SUmsed. A Marlon— Fred Paine. 
. ■ ■••„ GRARD RAPID B. 

».— » Park— Geo. Price Co —Iran Bankoff Co. 

The Gerald* — Fraseia Benanlt — Saras Breta — 

Claude Coleman. . 

"t- hajoutor. 

Xattk'a — Wallace Galilo — B. A H. 
Warden Bma.^-BeTen Glaaeoyna Malda. 

it I -. ' KoantT-.AT. - . 
Keith'*— Four Danabea— D ia m on d ft Br 
"Indoor Spoats"— Wlnaton Water Liana— Miller A 
Bradford. " *3S£-\4 "•-'.. ■ ■ '.-* '■ 

Keiti'a-^JamalaxQ Nary Oetette^-Bndlnoff-^Wls 
Slaters— Marfan ft KJoter— Felix A Flaner— Tnekan- 
aon ft Deacoa>-'- 

*' --gTTTT, 4 TTEUfBIa. 

Kaitk'a— B«*> Hall— DoreV Celebritlaa— Baa 
Pamnala anaa'-'-ri" 1 "' ft Gwxnn — "Beglnnlnt Of 
World— Kanffl-ilt-Bomalne— Krneat BraU Co.— Jack 
Kennedy ft <Jai— Cllrton Crawford. . '.-. 

W'-; -J 

PITTSHXTBOH. 
Baitet.-. 

Toaoirro. 
. . "Artistic ' Treat"— Maaon A 
MUlarablp A; Gerard— Chick A Cblckleb 
ft -Baldwin.^? '' __""" ■..„' : 

KaHk'a— OrrlHe Stam-^"'OTer-Beaa Berue"— H. 
ft O. KUaworth— Olaen ft Jobneon. 

T "l ORPHEUM .'•. .:''..• 

, CHICAGO, ILL :, 
MaleaUc— "Pnttlna It OTar**^Frlaeo t Oa— 
Doiry Kay— Mr! * Mr.. Melbnme— Edytha CUlford 
—Bobble Gordone — Larry Comer— H nines Moalcal 

Btata take- — 1 mhoff, Oesni ft Corlae — "Oh 
AnntlevS-Mnaieal Beboes— Cnrla. Blcharda— Patri- 
eoU^rtt A Cody— Alleena t A Bfa nlry — afa mt A 

Snyd — 



._ Prlacctoa aaaaM — Paaaaaai ft Orernott — If. A 
J. DoTe— Deanla Broa.— Mary Howard— OnTO- Man- 
ley— O'Connor A Dixon— Maaale A Anita— Jaa. C. 
Morton Co.— Mnalfal Cbriitlet. 

Utth Street— Clinton ft Rooney— Delano ft Plka 

BUly Hart ft GlrU— Geo • JoaaeU— Saxtpn ' A 

FarrsI— Marino A Malay. ^ 

Harlem Open Hanaa — Stanton A White — Two 
Bncka— Johnson, Baker A Johnson— Mande ft M. 
Dnnn— Wyatt'a Lada A Laaalea— Billy Hhodea. 

•lit Btreet— Frank A Btbel Carmen — Dtnnla 
Cnatot — Beerea ft Arnold— Boalna Zottl — Harrey. 
Kennedy ft Grayce — Holmes A DeVere — Miller ft 
Capman— Fire Princeton Gtrla— The Lelands— Geo. 
Jeaaell. 

Oraad Opera Home — Hran ft OinnlnKbam — Three 
Harmony Qlrla— Three Alex — "Ideal"— Mullen ft 
Fraacia. 

xx. TzajfOM. 

Mlaaea Parker— "Mrs. Wellington's Snr- 
Bowers ft Crocker— Aaakl A Taki— Delano 
A Pike— Bernard A Merrlt— JohnaoD. Bicker ft 
Johnson — Harriet Bempel. 



Dotaon 



w 



TO! 
Mary Howard— Bert A Soaedale— O'COODOT 
Dixon— Harriet Bemple — Upeldedowo Boy- 
Mullanc — Hampton A Blake — Turner A Grace — 
Marie— Bowers Walters ft Co.— Bananas Bros.' . 

BBOOKLT", H. X. 

Halaay — Juliette Bush — "Wat's on Your Mind' 
— ADaban Broa.— Zelaya — Creixbtoa A Stamm — 
Bteble Trio— Nip ft O'rWen— Beaa Barr— Weston 
A Co. — Bums A Girls— Frisco Three. 

OieauNiiInt — Jimmy Locaa — Billy Bhodes— Clin- 
ton A Soonay— Patsy Doyle — Breeo Family. . 

" A Merritt— Art Deaxon — Sam 



nmiAH afolis, nro. 

Mary A Area— Eddie 
Beetor. Weber A Lana— Herbert 
Kltamura Japa. 

.ITHACA, V. T. 
Fbar Melloa— B1U ITultt— Mrs. Bra Fay— Allan 
ft Richmond — Winkle ft Dean. 

JZRSXY CITT, M. 7. 
"Girl In the Frame"— Breen Family— Bert Lorry 
—Barbette— Bert Earle— Dotson-.Dunna, Tha. 

LAHCABTEB. PA. 
Dandac Dorians— A. A B. Lelber— Altboff Slaters 
— "New Doctor" — Mont* A Parto— Heleno Collno ft 
Co.— Weston ft Bllno— Roy LaPearl Co. 
KRW LOBDOB, COBH. 
jQao, -Boak — Millard Bms.— Bicas ft Ryan — Soaall 
A" Blaka— Inrenlle FoUlaa— Neary 'A Gore— Cara- 

ft Tumpklna — Geo. Toemakt — KlTlra Slater*. 

- itwui v. i. : ■■ ■■ 

A Drayton— MeLaUan A Carson— Wyat'l 
Lada A Laaalea — Ben Bemle — "Tbe Cat" — Bert 

L ° TBT * OTTAWA, CAWADA. 

Teren GlaasfOW .' MaWa— Dtaaaond ft Brennan — 

Wallace ft Galrin — Burna Bros. 

nRaVnXLD. MASS. 

ESrlra Slaters— Neary ft Gore— Hunter. Chick ft 
Hunter — Cayananxh ft Tompkins — Gerard a 
Monkera— Geo. Bock— Milan) Broa.— CaTanaujh A 
Tompkins — HaUen A Hunter— starMa Loyal Co. 

prrTSBtrBQH, pa. 

Annette A Morrell— Ohas. Bartholomew— Green 
MTUer ft Green— Bert ft Bet Fo es Minnie Stanley 
—Marcus ft Booth— Charles Martin— Dlion Bowers 
ft Dixon. s' - ' 

PAWTUUKXT. B, I . 
Le Vara— Walah A Bdwards— Jim Klnx-Jaas— 
Miller A Bradford— BJehard Lea— Fionas. Two— 
"Fbor or Di"— Hairy .Tejnjy. 

PATTRaOH. H. ,. 
Monarch Comedy Four— Gert Morgan— Musical 
Kll ties— Minnie Fa oat — ^"Abore the ■ lAmlt"— Bin? 
Bans Trio — Tom Sawyer — Joan Jacques — Hareey 
Hanley A Girls. 

RRADrRQ. FA. 
Pace, A Green— is. ft B. Mathews— Arthur Hard 
„ Co.— Harry Jolainv-A. J aula— Baila Bros.— Jcanette 
Cnllda— WllCOX LeCroU Co.— Bert Fltacttbona — 
CortnthlanaV _ ' ' ■ 

STRAcrusi:, M. I. 

Oraaaaat— "Stars in Toy land — CoL Jack George — 
Dancing Sercna dcre Canea 

Blcbardo — Sam Tee Troop 



(Last 



Qraad— Three KJJlarney GlrU— Gertie Fowler. 

Mow Valaos \Flrat Half)— Harris ft Lyman— 
Nine Wassaaa Araha. (Last HaU)— Freda rtcka A 
Van — "Her Tsonaaan" — Orpbens Comedy Fear. 
• ' • XOtSFORS, nx. 

Paiaoa (First Half)— "Holiday la DUIaland"— 

ana GrisaaT Helen Leach Wallla Trio. (Last 
Half) — Kalakaat'a HawaUana— Daeey Jamiiaoa — 
Barry Tjangdon ft Co. 

•., ... SS. PATTL, MDTaT. 

Maw Paiaoa (Flrat Half) adaiiianii Fiadarlcks 
ft Tan — HMmiato Dancers— Drpiaaus Comedy Four. 
<Laat Half)— Harria A Lyman Bhlmmta Dancers. 

gPBXaTOrrEXI?, TT . T 

Majaatlo— aaaaaa Blue A Co.— Boat A 
Kla*t Vaaaar Girls— Ootneay ft- Flalas. 
Half)— BflBa A Dof— McCUln. Oatea A 
Cabaret DeLuxa — Lccy Olllert. 

BTTPXRIOR. WB. 

Vow Paiaoa (First HaU)— Sherman A 
Ferro ft Coo Iter — f *eeds Syncopated 
Hugh. Jack A G*/a-. e — Choy Hen Wba Trocpa. 
(Last Half )— Three .tinge of Ha 
We Grow Up"— Cnrla,*; ft 7 

SOUTH BEaTD, JM. 

Orpiaum— Cilef Uttle Elk A Co.— "Our rkmlly'' 
—Barry ft Layton — Dignen ft c»**-»o. (Last 
Half)— Juggling DeArmo— Pat ft Paggy ITiinllim 
The New Leader — Brltt Wood. 

pill HAUTE, nfD. 
BlFsoara m e K remka Bros.— BUlla ft Dot— Miller 
Lyle— Cabaret De Loxe— frank DeVos ft Harry 
Hosford— Lney ■ GlUctt, (Laat Half)— Harry ft 

' Nancy Caraaa— Dorothy Vangnan — Barry A Ley- 
ton— BeD'a Hawaiian*— Conway A stelae— Demon 

a carton. -^ 

WLWWOTO, atAJf., CAJt. 
Btraad (First Half)— Wright A Ekrl— Knowlea 
ft Hunt. (Laat B*lr>—Waid ft Howiro— lleca 
Cooper A Oo— Oraee DeWlnUre— Flee Vtotta 



PAWTAGES CIRCUIT 

Sa a rassssaaaaa a i »«•«&•«& 




[ley A Fltx»Traid 
'TempU- 



Booeaattl 
Vogue— Long A 



* If art aural— Beans* De 
Card— rtitema. 




■'-'> ' 



■;■:■ 



CALGART. 

Julio* Ta on en — WOT - Ward 
Kelly ft Co.- 
r Qaacolrmea. j*-. -. 

pomx ' 

Dobaoci ft Sirena— Bronaon 
Talker— Bapa A 

8hawai-8wif t ggB^elley-^Garclnettl 

A Balast-Gfaen 

jroo— Bob ft 



Jimmy Locaa— Ed. A Lottie Ford— "Mrs. WeUing- k«mka. t aiXX XmABT B. T. 

to '" 80I? ^"ATXZH«>W*.,»A. PlQuoftFelk, ad Tb»a_B><k *_Wblt. 

Mario A Duffy — Jeanette Cbiid* — Wilcox LeCroix 
Co. — Bert Fltagihbona — Dorce'* Ceiebrirlea — 

Toungera— Smith A Farmer— Magxlc LeClalr Co. — »■ ^j., ,. ^ v«. 

Billy McDermott— Sterling Saxo Four. 

ALBAST, ». Y. 
Jerome A Newell— Helen Tlneent— Beatrice 
Morgan Co.— Meyers :A .'Bernard—Wroth Wayten 
Four— Sli Military Glrla— Jack Martin Co.— Corala 
ft Verdla — Monaly McCarthy Co. — Melaotte ft Lee- 
don— Brooks ft George— Three Melforda. 



-Khar uar M einocfe 

ft Loniae. 

. DTTLTfTH. 
Orobaam— Mme. Ellis— Burt ft Boawdala— Ja Da 
Trlo--Regay A Lorraine Sister*— Belgian Trio. 

LOS AHOEIXS. 
Orpianm— Ollrer ft Olp— Chinese Brass Band— 
Murphy ft White— Mile Nadje— Frances Donxh-rtJ 
—■^eekleaa Ere"— lone Pastori— Nelson A Chain. 

LTMCOLS. 
Ornheum— Morgan Daneera— Great Lester— Lloyd 
ft' wS*— Harry Holman A Co.— Brodean A SllTer- 
mooo— Ann Gray— La Bne ft Dupten. 
MTjrjrEAPOLIB. 
Oinhaam Mrs Gene Hughes ft Co.— Stone ft 
KaUtx—Ylp Tip x-apbankara^ortmj A 
Maletta B on c on rt A rrT*" 1 *— • Bros, ft arratryn. 



BrXQHAMTOH, 
Art - Smlth-^-Hej 
Meyers— CoL Jack Gaorge— Daneini Serenadera. 

CTRCraTrATI, 0. 
• Wilbur ft Lyle — Young A Wheeler— ^Earry Lalxbt 

A Co. B. Smiley A Cb.^-Cooney Sisters— TruneUe 

*AThr*e. "V? 

CHESTEH. FA, 
"Act Beautiful"— Weston A EUne— Helen Olea- 
aon Co.— Barry McCormlck— Eight Blatk Data- 
Bed ft Blondie— Wahnan ft Berry— Let's Get Mar- 
ried— Klmberly ft Page — "The OwL" .. 



Ornawam— D. 8. Jaaa Band-Stepbeas A HoHlsta t 
-jSmySsTo ft Co.— Helen Sebolder— Ergotti'a 
Liilipnttans— Lydell A Maey. 

ST, PAUL, 

X),,!^,-*-'^ Tet Maria^SJaxtens-^ane. 

Moray ft Moore— Farrell Taylor ft Cto.-^onaM 

Bontrta Jack Morxiaaey A Co.— Daria A DamaO. 

SAM rRASCIBCO. 

Ornesnan— Trlxle Frlganaa— Long; Tack: Sam ft 

Co-SaV Habr ft Waluron— The Bradnaa-r-Ben 

Deely ft* Co.— •'PianoTflle"— SUdlux BUly 

A Alice Forest. - - lil_J 

SALT LAKE CITT. 

fkeaTsaamv— "An American Ace"-^He 
ftSSSSsakjaSsaaaa 5 Ot^-aqiMaaaa-A - a Wtft el l 



CAMDEN, jr. J. 
Bed ft Blondie — Walman ft Berry — "Let's Get 
Married" — Klmberly. ft Page — "Tbe Owl" — "Act 
Beautiful"— Garry Owen ft Co. — Helen Qlcaaon Co. 
—Barry McCormlck Co.— fagot Black Dots. 

DAYTOJt. OHIO. 
Hughe* Moalcal Two— Four Dancing Demons— 
Douglas Fsmily— Aileen Stanley— Frear. Bargett A 
Frear— Jack Hanley — McDonald ft. Cleveland — Geo. 
gkangap Bob ft Boninaon — Three Berlo Girls. 

TT.amtA, S, T, 
Three Kings— BD1 Prultt— Four XeDos— Nagflya 
—Allen A Richmond — Copes ft Hotton — Winkel ft 

Dean— Harmony Club. 

ELIZABETH. M. J. 
Keegan ft Edward*— Wallace A Farrell— Jaa. 
Thompson Co.— Marlon Weeks— "Beauty Shop" — 
Fred Xldrldge— Mabl* A Jno Dose — Bobbin* Family 



•aaaaaaaaaapsssfssa* FA. 
Broa.— Smith', ft 



Brny •MeI>*rinott r -CorinfJdana-^Paajo -A'' C 



Jolaon ft 



SaHat 

JffflyvM 

' A B Ma th ewa— Artbnr Hasal Co.- 
Co.— Ed. Janla A Co. : 
'■' -,- ._'■-- HAEZLTOR, PA. 
- Fxa»»» jCkwtar-JaeMlaaoa-Qlrla^ 
hart-^Starllng Saxo Four— Fred A Albert-Lan* A 
Tf s m a i IT-l%sT : Bl>t a i n B»l^ *; P l ) sa s. rJ ■■■:- 



Berue — Erie Zardo — Cannon 

Cooper ft RJcaxdo— Jules-Annette Garrison— Wilbur 
8weatmaa A Co. — Soma* Troope. 
SYRACUSE, >, Y, 
Temple — Selma Braata— -Tanxo 
Ajmett* curriaon— Melnotte A Lead en Wnbtrr 
sweatman Co.— Romas Tro upe Canton Three— 
Welch A Lout— Barry Oaks A Co.— Lob* Meroff 
Co.— Strand Three— New Black eV White Barua. . 
BCRAjrTOB, FA. " 

Walter Hayes— Sidney A Twonaly— Mia. Gaaa 
Hue be*— Bo j • LaPearl— Younger*— Frank Carter— 
Manning ft Hall — Maxdo ft Hunter — Bob BandeU — 

Doree'a Celebritlaa. . ^ .» ,;• 

TRESTOR, B. J. 
Ardo — Monte ft Parte— Helen Collno ft Co. — 
Garry Owen ft Co.— Hendricks Belle Isle— Dancing. 
- Dorians— Hooper ft Buxkbart— A. ft B. Lelber— 
Francis A Orerbolt— Hadji Saaaboll A Co. 

, TOROaTTO. C A R ADA. 

Dancing Humphreys — Art Brown— Ketao ft Leigh- 
ton— Four Harmony Kings— Brana A Wilson — 
I>eKoek Trowps. . - _ 

TROY, R. Y. 
Jack Martin ft Co.— Coada ft Verdi— Mullaly- 
HcCartby Co. — Franda Benault^Biooks A Oauiga . 
—Three Malfords— Jerome ft Newell— Helen Yra- 
' cent— Beatrice Morgan A Co.— Barnard A Mayers — 
Worthy Wyten Fonr— Six MlUUry Girl*. , 

TOLEDO, O.- 
Jack Hanlei— McDonald A Clereland — Geo. Ban- ' 
dell— Bob A Robinson— Three Berlo G Iris— Hughes 
Mntdeal Two— Four Dancing De mo ns Dnngl ss 
Family — Aileen Stanley — Frear. Bagxett A. Fraar. 

WOOSSOCKET, 
Florens Doo— Texaa Comedy Four— Harry Texoxy 
Co.— Jim ft Jaaa King— Dancing LeYara— Wslaat ft 
Edwards. 

B. F. KEITH WESTERN 

OHICAOO, ILL. 
Aeaarisaa (Last Half) — Burksardt ft Roberta— 
Virginia BeHea — Gene Greene— Lob** ft Starring. 

DECATUR, HX. 



*l? 




EDMORTOR, CAR. 
O. H. Teddy— Frank 
A Co. — Georgia Howard— Tliree FiaAart. 

" CALG AR Y, CAR AD A. 
"Oh, Billy"— Hall A Shapiro— Joe 
McLean A Co.— Stagpole ft flnler Msaarta 

. GREAT FALLS ART) HELERA. MOatT. 

"Honeymoon Inn" Shaw A Barnard — Maka- 
raaka Doo— Marry Lirlngeton — Aaetln A Daleiiej — 
Blala. 

BUTTE. MORT (4 Days). ARAf»RT)A AMD 

I MISSOULA (1 Day). 
Cyeno Japa— Clyde Cook— Venetian Gypsies Bit, 
her ft North— Lady Alice'* Pets— La Petite Bra. 

'.-'•"'.•. SPOKARI, WASH. ' r 
Golden Troape— Maria arsMBaeaaassss*. 
CMsholm A Brt 
sea 

bxattix, -s/Axca. 

- J.rrla BeTW* Aw Woblman— Porter J. Wbita 'A 

Co.— Anita Arllsa— Cannald* ■sTaj E Muisj|l««tola. 

0= TAROOVrX-a. M. k M Svffl 

Little Lambs— Batter Broa.— Bay Oeajlin->Im- 
perlal Quintette— Bay A Emma Daan— far** 
R o mano ff Slaters. 

ti crrosiA, b. o. 

The ' Shattocka— Bobbie Henahaw — Q Urain Dan- 
cers— Blalto Quartette— Jo* Jackson— Gaylord ft 

TACOMA, WASH. 
"Her Lett Shoolder"— Florence Baynald— ZlagWr 
Twins ft Co.— Angel ft FnHei— Ball ft Bra. 

r-ORTLARD, ORE. 
Broaln* ft Brown— Dorothy Lewis— Richard ta* 
Great— Hello Faesle. Hells Ban ft Was t S tewart 

J §AR FRARC1SO0, CAL. 

' Sntrmarlll* F-7 — JnBet Dtka — Tha CroanrsHs— 
Aran A' Virginia Slaters— Norelty Minstrels — Grass 
A fug b . ~ 

. _ OAKLAJ-TD, CAL. 

A Laaader— Lawrenc* ft Edwa ida R ain* 
A Preenti Prlmroas Mtnsliala 
Midgets. 

LOS ARGELBS, CAL. 
Amoroa A Obey— Batty Brooks— Lots ft 
Meyers ft W aaae r D a rt M a lm s* Song A 
Berne. 

SAM DIEGO, CAL. 
Diaa A Monks— Mat* A PnTJatts— CtMt raai 
ft Co. — Empire Quar tet ta J as Fw 

ft Oo. . . "•- ■•' t •;' 

I BAU LAKE COT, o-EAM. - < : 
Monro* ft Grant 
lea Dercy— KaHy Field Player*. 



■afjs 



. 



' '•■'' -ij: *' " 'V. 










cmwTkMuMMht I HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUB, GO 



Ireatest Comedy Song 
on the Market 



BEN BORNSTEIN, Genera! IV)^ 



^August 13, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



y-r:i "■/>■'-. -yi 



rv 



jB win Jma 



■M: 



U the coming season and submit the Jollowing: SURE FIRE HITS 



^C^^;:A ; ^I;S^rt^ftl" 



a- •": 

Doubles ; f op Two Men o>>Tw © Girls • 
Choruses..: 



'. 



fr. Numter 
!0 the Country 

3 HIRSCH 

by 
^MIDT 






BIG DIXIE SONG HIT 



'- -; Master by ' . 
'ttfcRftY VOW TILZE^ 



m 



The Best Bliicjsi^ -^ 
Song on the Market 



r *airi 



AIN'T 'EN 



^wumM 



.■*y 



HAVE THE 



.S^r^**' 



" "•^^S^^^'::.-^- i <; 



A Great Harmony Song and 
a Groat Patter Chortu 



V 



i&* 



'h;< ; . 



..**. 



'■ ^f:...: _^-l- 



| YELLEN 



222 West 46th Street, New York City l so J^^^V^r^ 

MURRAY BLOOM, Professional Manaqer || SUM EBOD Y S .WAITING 

FOR SOMEONE 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13, 1919 








SINGER and INSTRUMENTALIST 



, : k: 






The Only Chinese 
Yodeler in the World 

'":■.. ---£ Ns^ .■.':* : . ■- -* 

SPECIAL SCENERY : DIRECTION TOM JONES : 






h.. 



•:- a • 



■.--"-■_' ^:-, 

-. :>. ■ --■ ■ .-.-• 






.'■-••....;-■,.-•:■:■:.! ■ KSg 



'' . y 



MAX HART Presents 




BIL VANE 



r- 

■■ 
'<■ ■ 



a *s. 



WITH LEON DOMQUE 

Open on the Orpheum Circuit, Aug. 18th, at Mi 

BOOKED SOLID UNTIL JUNE, 1920 



• ■■ 



--■•-■' - .. .: ■-= j |* : 

is, Minn. 

.: '• --' -'* .-';-57: ^ ,• : 



. m ■ ■ 

8 : • t 



?r.ft r33 

. n ! 

.* '' 1 






-.-- 



'SSS.S, SSS '/SSS//S///''S///////S// ////////// '//SSS, 



'SSSSSsSS/J//S/S/S///fS///sS/SSS///SS/SSSSSS/SSSS*rSSfSSSS^^ 





1 1 ) KEITH'S PALACE, N. 



IVIAX 



■ .■-.';- -*-.r 



UMMIIU^lUIIIJMUWl^^lMWW^^^ 



.» . -•-- -,-,.„-• 



'-": ~. • . .-v. - •••- -^ - "- .- .. . 




• #-■- V----* 



August 13, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



STAGE HANDS WONT STRIKE WITH ACTORS, WITHOUT CUVING-NOTICE 



--• "'.:-■ 



•s i ■ : 



(Continued from page 3) 



tlOD 




behalf of Zlegfeld's Follies, Inc., 

Harry.41 ountford, James;, W. time. 

nl N.>«unier, -Eddie Castor, A» 

pb BcSnck. Johnny Doqley, about 



y Brown 



Fitsj 
Gas 

Ear DodJK* Eddie bowling, Harry Brown 
ua John 7 * t eele, restraining them from In- 
terfering with or attempting to get players 
under contract with the Zlerfeld corpora- 
tion to break this contract. The Injunction 
was Issued by Justice Richard P. Lydon and 
will be returnable for argument In the court 
on Friday morning. - 

The ■ complaint specifies that .the show, 
which is being presented at the Mew Amster- 
dam Theatre was produced at a cost of 
1178,000 and that Its maintenance took 
$15,479 weekly. 

The Injunction and restraining order was 
■erred upon Cantor, who was In Zlegfeld's 
office at the time, and the other members of 
the company mentioned In the complaint 
were also served during the early evening. 
An a result of the Court order, Cantor and 
Ida co-workers who would have been called 
upon to strike after Zlegfeld bad declared 
bis position Went to work at the evening 
performance. It was announced by the 
Actors' Equity during the afternoon that 
the members of the chorus of the "Follies" 
were going on strike. However, the court 
order, which also applied to the members 
of the company seemed to impress the girls, 
as they were all on the Job at the night 
performance. According to Sam. H. Harris, 
president of the Managers' Association, 
Eddie Cantor, after being served with the 
papers in the suit Immediately forwarded 
his resignation to the Equity. 

Managers Go* New Member* 
A meeting of the managers was held 
Monday afternoon at which three new mem- 
bers were In attendance, they being Flo. 
Zlegfeld, Charles Emerson Cook and waiter 
F. wanger. In addition to these there were 
present, George M. Cohan, Bainbridge Colby, 
Arthur Hopkins, David Belasco, William A. 
Brady, Chas. Coburn, Sam. H. Harris, 
Harrison Grey Flske, Al. Aarons, L. Law- 
rence Weber, George Broadhorat, Lee Shu- 
bert, Arthur Hammerateln. . C. B. Dilling- 
ham, Edgar Selwyn and Martin Hemnan. 

The chief subject discussed was the bring- 
ing of the suits against those responsible for 
the walkout and it was arranged that each 
of the producers who was affected by the 
strike order would bring a suit against 
those believed culpable. 

At the Equity headquarters Monday It waa 
said that Ruth Terry, one of the principals 
In "The Gold Diggers" company, called for 
rehearsal, had said that David Belasco sent 
word to the company that he was ill and that 
the members should go home and not worry, 
as they would be called, back when the pres- 
ent trouble was settled. 

It was said that the entire cast and chorus 
of Raymond Hitchcock's "Hitchy-Koo** com- 
pany, now In rehearsal, bad applied for mem- 
bership in the Equity. 

Ernest Glendennlng, brother of Jessie Glen- 
denning, was sponsor for the statement that 
bis sister would no longer appear in "The 
Challenge," at the Selwyn Theatre. 

According to reports at headquarters, Jed 
Prouty. Ann Pennington, Herbert CortheU 
and E Gayer made a pilgrimage to Wall 
Street In automobiles which had banners with 
the following inscription : 

"We don't ask for more pay, bnt we do 
want fair play. Watch your step If you buy 
ticket* for a show tonight. ' We are willing 
to arbitrate but the managers are not," 

An advertisement appeared In the Monday 
papers for chorus girls to report at tbe Lyric 
Theatre. It called for seven ty-nve girls, and 
the Equity Immediately had pickets on the Job 
to warn the girls away when it was learned 
that they -Were wanted for "The Majestic 
Melody," a musical comedy to be produced in 
October by an Independent producer.- When 
this fact was ascertained, the pickets were 
recalled. 

The chorus girls were somewhat disap- 
pointed on Monday afternoon when it was 
announced that P. G. Shea, the strike organ- 
iser, would be unable to address them at the 
initial meeting for the forming of their 
auxiliary to the Equity. Two of these meet- 
ings were held during the afternoon. Francis 
Wilson addressed the first and said, in part: 
"I have employed girls In my musical com- 
edy career, and know of the great Injustices 
they have to labor under. I want the chorus 
girls to be the actors' 'Cuba.' We want to 
organize you and give you independence in 
the same manner that the United States gave 
it to the island of Cuba. We will be your 
United States. It Is an outrage to have you 
work at rehearsal without compensation. 
Where do these managers suppose you get 
your money to live on during that period V' 

Others who spoke besides Wilson at this 
meeting were Harry Brown and Amos Hogan, 
delegate of tbe Stenographers' Union. 
- Wilson Adcfcrwasos Actors 
Prior to the meeting of the chorus girls, 
Wilson addressed the actors assembled in the 
club. In part he said : 
"You have victory in the palms of your 
• hands. I thought this strike would be over 
much sooner. But, sooner or later, we will 
win. As for yielding to tbe managers, 'yon 
can tell them to go to hell.* •* 

He then told of bow E. H.- So them tried, 
to settle in six minutes what It took six yean 
to accomplish. When Wilson mentioned the 
name of Howard Kyle, there werejeers and 
hisses beard for several minutes. With, refer- 
ence to Kyle be said : 

"Kyle was the hardest worker the A. E. A. 
ever had. He gave himself heart and soul to 
the Equity, but when he found that he could 
not dictate the policy, as an individual, hs 
dropped out -of the council and its actrfltJsa. 



and did not attend the meetings as often 
In to* past. -Bnt when -he, did he opp 
everything*, which waa brought * at 
ttn»."TK5v. !■ tf 

As MtfVwllson Wiclnded these remarks, 
about -fifteen membep Jumped op Stum their 
. seats and. In chorus, shouted : fJ J* ' 

"How about our contracts! Where do we 
stand? Will the law get us 7" 

Mr. Wilson did not answer this question, so 
he delegated Jefferson De Angelis to make 
the reply. The latter said : ■ ■ - 

"Nobody, who held an Equity contract was 
breaking It- The managers have already 
broken them as tbey have not been living 
up to the eighteenth clause, which provides 
for arbitration." 

Wilson L«*Tet Town 

They seemed to be satisfied with this ex- 
planation, as the. speaker was cheered. Mr. 
Wilson, before leaving, stated that be waa 
going out of town on an Important mission, 
and that when he returned he would have 
gratifying news for the members. 

A meeting which was said to be 'Informal 
was held In the Equity offices Monday noon, 
and representatives of labor organizations 

Sarticipated. After the conference Frank 
Ulmore announced that the results were 
gratifying, but tbey would not be divulged 
as they did not care' to make public their 
plans. 
- Mr. G Ulmore stated that Charles C. Shay, 
president of the I. A. T. S. E., and Joseph N. 
Weber, president of tbe American Federation 
of Musicians, were not present, but that rep- 
resentatives from both organisations were 
there. At the headquarters of the stage 
hands, in Forty-sixth street, it was stated 
that Shay was out of town and, to the knowl- 
edge of those In charge of the International 
offices, no one bad been present at the meet- 
Ed Wynn and Barney Bernard, tbe last 
Seakers on Monday afternoon, announced 
at on the following day they were to meet 
In conference Mortimer Schlff. son of Jacob 
H. Schlff, tbe banker, and Vincent Astor. 
Both of these wealthy men, according to 
Wynn, without solicitation, evinced a deep 
Interest in tbe actors' cause, expressing com- 
plete sympathy with them and asked If they 
could be of any aid. Just what aid will be 
asked of these wealthy men will be decided 
at tbe conference between them and the two 
Equity members. 

Incidentally, It may be mentioned that Yin- 
cent Astor Is the owner of most of the prop- 
erty in the theatrical district on which the 
Shnberts have built theatres and on other 
property on which tbe Shuberts bold options. 
The chorus girls and chorus men were noti- 
fied to be at the Amsterdam Opera House on 
Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock, where they 
would be definitely organized into an auxil- 
iary of the Equity, Association. It was de- 
cided to let the chorus folk decide for them- 
selves the amount of yearly dues tbey cared 
to pay. 

-Monday, at strike headquarters, seemed to 
be given over very much to the chorus folk : 
those who had walked out of current musi- 
cal shows and those who were wheeded 
' away from shows that were In course of re- 
hearsal. Just so soon as the room was 
emptied of one group to whom the strike 
situation bad been explained by the various 
speakers another group streamed in. Each 
numbered at least 800 Individuals, who 
packed the room until; the doors bad to be 
closed. - 

• -In every Instance where the chorus folk 
were asked whether they understood what 
the actors were fighting for, a large number 
of them In the room answered "Mo." To 
W. B. Rubin, attorney for tbe American 
Federation of Labor, was assigned the task 
of ssnaawMssssg those who pleaded Ignorance. 
Wynn Warn* Acton 

Ed. Wynn also spent a large part of 
Monday warning the actors not to be 
weaned away "by flattery or sped on s phrases 
'from the Equity cause they had" espoused, . 
also explaining the psychological effect that 
. words had on player folk In the following 
words: 

"We are naturally temperamental, we act- 
ors, and. therefore, it Is not a difficult mat- 
ter for us to be. swayed by anyone who can 
speak a thought that coincides with our . 
own. I suppo s e that I shall be mads the 
'goat' by the managers for the part I am 
playing in this strike, but you can rest as- 
sured tbst I don't give a damn for any of 
them. 

"I walked out of the 'Gaieties* to take up 
your cause,- playing- In that show- after 
eighteen years of the hardest kind of work. 
Perhaps the managers will never permit me 
to play again. I am not worried. In all 
the years I have been on the stage I have 
managed to earn enough money to keep me 
the. rest of my days: but I did not earn 
this money from the stage. 

"This,' too, I want" to tell' you." ne con- 
tinued. "In the new home in the country 
that I bought for myself and wife recently 
there Is room for six more people. Any of 
yon wbo are fighting tbe managers and who 
are unable to get along are perfectly , wel- 
come to 'come and live with us. 1 * 
,' Wynn was followed by Barney Bernard, 
who explained that he was not making the 
-flEht for himself, because he had reached the 
point In the theatrical profession where he 
would probably not need the help of any 
organization. ■' - 

"For the contract I have with Woods for 
the next two years includes everything that 
I could think of he said. "In fact. Woods 
Just about allows me everything but the 
theatre. - - ••-- -. "■- ■ .'• • • -_ 

•*Bnt,let joe teH;yoa," ha went onr "I 
am in this fight to stick by you until the 
bitter end. and if yon stick, too. tiers is 
no doubt In my mind that we wfn win." 



Palay, the Oriental dancer, and a 

chorus girls, all nf whom bad I ~ 

__ • show. sd»edutoEE> open in ~~ 
deiphla Labor Dan camelk from the 
Theatre^where the reheaftsal was cal 
ready to Join the Equity? ' They told how 
Charles Simmons, of the Bnnbert office, bad 
been trying all morning to get them to sign 
applications for membership in a new or- 
ganization now being fostered by the man- 
agers. Some of the girls bad signed, - 
Simmons explaining that tbey would not 
have to pay any dues, but most of the girls 
refused, led by Miss Palay. who Inquired 
of Simmons what It was all about and re- 
ceiving; what she says waa an unsatlsfao- 
tory reply, she advised tbe other girls not 

to sign, '-. 

"Too will have a fine organisation," Sim- 
mons is reported to have explained, "where 
you can voice aU your grievances." 

J. M. Parker, International organizer of 
the street car men of America, also spoke. 

Hugh .Frayne, secretary, of the American 
Federation of Labor, came In and addressed 
the actors following the announcement that 
P. J. Shea was unable to be present. At 
the very outset he explained be was helping 
in the conduct of five strikes at the present 
time. .. 

"Let me assure you that no settlement 
win be made that will not protect the very, 
last one In this profession who .has" helped 
win the cause," he said. "Labor has never 
been defeated; labor cannot be defeated, and 
you will excuse me if 1 put you In that 
class. But don't forget that tbe stern real- 
ities of life makes It necessary that we* have 
a decent living wage." 

Pearl White Malms Sposch 

Pearl White arrived on the scene at this 
point and permission was given her to ad. 
dre*a the netors- 

"The difference between myself and you," 
she said, "la that I get paid for keeping 
silent — well paid, I might add, for I can 
truthfully -state that I earn more than the 
manotrers. ... 

"And as regards managers." she added, "I 
think that I hold a record among actors, for 
during the fifteen years -that I have been 
playing I think that I have played for more 
managers without getting my money from 
them than anybody else. 

"This really Isn't my fight. This la your 
fight, for I have a two-year contract through 
which I will earn more than the managers, 
I think. But Just the same I am in this 
fight to help you — aU motion picture actors 
should -Join -with you and help you, be- 
cause we are all of one profession, and we 
should all stick together.' r 

For the first time since the strike started 
actors -on Monday night appeared In the 
theatrical district to parade In front of tbe 
theatres where productions are etui dolus 
business. They marched bock and forth 
through .the side streets of the Rlalto and 
up and down Broadway. They wore picket 
cards and. small posters. One of the latter 
read : "The Actors' Equity Association — the 
actors helped swell the police pension fund. 
Will you help the actors get Justice?" 

Speeches were also made by actors and 
actresses from automobiles at street corners. 
They appealed to crowds to help them win 
the strike and explained in detail, the reason 
they are fighting the producing managers. 

On a charge of creating disorder in front 
of the Lyric Theatre, a man >wbo gave 
his name aa William Fox. of Victoria street, 
Jamaica. L. I., a theatrical manager, and 
Harry Spencer, of West Forty-fifth street, 
were brought to the Forty-seventh street 
police station shortly before curtain time 
Monday, evening. 

Spencer stated that during the argument, 
supposed to have been In reference to the 
strike. Fox struck him in the face, after 
which Officer sherah. of the Forty-seventh 
street police station, placed both under ar- 
rest for creating disorder. Spencer refused' 
to make a complaint and' they were both' 
set free. 

The Hippodrome show, now In rehearsal, 
has not. been interfe r e d with. 

■X . Graco C oo Tg e Snow 

It was said on Monday that "She Would 
and She Did? would not be able to open at 
tbe VanderbUt this week as scheduled. 
. This show had trouble when it went into 
rehearsal. Robert McQuarrie asked for an 
Equity contract. All the other members of 
Miss George's company had been engaged 
by William A. Brady early this spring under 
the standard contract. McQuarrie, though. 
asked for one after the middle of July — 
after the date, that Is. when ' the ' A. . E. A. 
Joined .the American Federation of Labor, 
and thereby, strengthened their cause In ease 
of a strike. 

Mr. Brady instead, it Is reported, offered 
him the contract which the managers bad 
ag reed among themselves to present to their 
'casts. McQuarrie declined to accept this. 
and left, the company. ■ His retirement 
caused a delay of a week In the production' 
of "She Would and. She Old." - 

John Cromwell, stage director for Mr. 
Brady, was hastily called from the port of 
the detective cap tain, which be has been flU- 
lng since "At 9 : 43" opened at the Play- 
house, and was installed in Mr. McQu.tr He** 
role. He played' opposite Miss George at 
Asbury Park, where the piece opened last 
week. .... 



ano* as 





following < 

r Francis i _ 

^dent of thi,Jfctor> BSalty 1% Bruce Me. 
Rae, Orass-iietewiK RlcbJM A. 
Harry MooaMru. James Fltspatrlck, 
Olllmore. Mht^. Cope. Frank Mills, Barney 
Bernard, Jefferson da Angelis, Arthur Byron, 
Thomas A. Wise. George Nash, Walter Jones, 
Herbert CortheU, Grant Mitchell, Joseph 
Santley, Frederic Santlej. Normsn Trevor, 

Hsrry Browne. Frank Hatch, Lumsdea 

Hare, Sam Bernard, Ralph Morgan, Ernest 
Truex, George La Guerre, John Charles 

. Thomas, Louis Simon, Bobert Grey, Morgan 
Coman, Robert Kelley, Harrison Hunter, 
Eddie Foy, Carl Hyson, Haszard Short, 
Harry Harwood, Cyril Scott, Oliver P. Heg- 
gie, . Richard Gordon, John Stokes, Richard 
W. Tucker, Cyril Chadwlck Wlllard Boyd. 
Francis X. Bushman, Richard Carle, WUllam 
P. Carleton, Edward Mordaunt, Pedro de 

: Cordoba, '' Harry Conor. William Courtletgh, 

' Douglas Fairbanks, William Courtenay, WUl- 
lam S. Hart, Henri de Vrlcs, Allan Dwan, 
Denman Maley, Lhurette Taylor, J. Forbes 
Robertson, Cyril Maude, Wallace Eddinger, 
George P. Piatt, Frank Belcher, Robert 
Edeson, Blanche .Ring, Dan Robertson, 
Forrest Robinson, J WUllam Farnum, Due- 
tin Farnum, Elsie Ferguson. Max Fig- 
man, Trixie Friganxa, Robert T. Haines, 
Sam Hardy. Ben Hendricks, De Wolf Hop- 
per, Cyril KelgbUer. William J. Kelly, Jo- 
seph Kilgour, Wilton Lackaye, Sheldon 
Lewis, Thomas J. McGrane, Frank Mclntyre, 
George MacFarlane Andrew Mack. Georgt 
G. McQuarrie. J. Hartley Manners, Robert 
ManteU, Edith W. Matheson, FuUer MeUIeb, 

. Antonio Moreno, John Daly Murphy, Mary 
Nash, Florence Nash, Conrad Nagel, WUllam 
Norton, AUa Nasimova. Fred Niblo, James 
Ll Crane, Eugene O'Brien, James O'Neill, 
Frederick Perry, Francis Byrne, Guy Bates 
Post, Tyrone Power, Edwin J. Badcliffe, 
Thomas W. Ross, George Prober t, Ernest 
Lawford. Henry Kolker, Frank Keenan, 
Julius Tannen, Fred Stone, Emily Stevens, 
Hilda Spong, Otis Skinner, Julia Sanderson, 
William Sampson,; Charles Ruggles, Orrln 
Johnson, Henry Jewett, DeWttt C. Jennings. 
Margaret Wlcherly. Russ WbitaU, Walker 
Whiteside, Scott Welch. Harry B. Warner, 
Charles wsldron. Brandon Tynan. Julian El- 
tinge, Edgar A. Ely, Herbert Tost, Loo Dlt- 
rlchsteln. WUllam B. Mack, Louise Mcintosh. 
Montague Love, John Emerson, Philip Merl- 
vale, Dodson Mitchell, Frank Monroe. Ed- 
win Nlcander, Ohauneey Olcott, Eleanor 
Painter, Florence Reed, Charles McNanchton, 
Colin Campbell, Henry Warwick, Edwin 
-Taylor. Olive Reeves Smith, Sydney Jarrts, 
John B. Mlltern, "RftbllFTJag. Vincent Ser- 
rano, c Aubrey Smith, Herbert Standing, 
jr., Henry Stephenson, Charles A. Steven- 
son. Willis P. Bweatman, Jessie Glendlnalng, 
Ernest Glendlnnlog, BUUe B. Van, Henry 
- B. WaltnaU. Dallas Welford, Charles B. 
Welles, W1U West" John Westley. Malcolm 
wmiam*. Forrest! Wlnant, Oswald Yorke, 
Lionel Adams, Matlvn Arbuckle, Roy AtweB, 
King Baggott. Byion Beasley, Richard Ben- 
nett, George Bebsn, James Bradbury. Donald 
Brian, Edmund Preese. Frederic Burton, 
Frank Kemble Cooper. Frazer Coulter, Frank 
Craven, Maurice 1 CoeteUo, Frederic De 
Belleville. ■ 



THOSE NAMED BY SHUBERTS 

IN W 00,000 LEGAL ACTION 

The application for an injunction against 
the member* and officials. »f. the Actor's 
Equity Association. In the suit of the Winter 
Garden company for an Injunction and for 
damage* In the *um of 1500,000, named tbe 



MANAGERS ISSUE STATEMENT 

C MERINO W£pLE SITUATION 

The consmlttee ' of managers, headed by 
David Belasco, on Sunday Issued the fol- 
lowing stateznezrt: 

"In a desire to make clear Its stand to 
the public In u e present difficulty with 
the Actors' Equity Association, the Pro- 
ducing; Manager^' Asso c iation issued tbe 
following; statement yesterday: I 

"The Produclrte Managers' Aseociatlq 
of America invited the council of til 
Actors' Equity ^Association to a meeting; 
at the 'Hotel Claridare. May I. to enter into 
a continuation of the relations that had 
existed between- the managers and the 
Actors' Equity Association for several years. 
At this meeting the Produclnf Managers' 
Association informed the . Actors' Equity 
Association that It was desirous of entering; 
into an agreement with the Actors' Equity 
Association for a period of three or live 
years; that It favored a permanent arbitra- 
tion board, composed equally of actors and 
managers, this board to submit to the de- 
cision of an outside umpire in case of dead- 
lock. 

"During the meeting; Mr. Francis Wilson, 
president or the Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion,' was aaked If his association was tak- 
ing steps toward tbe 'closed shoo.' Mr. 
Wilson admitted that some such action had 
been taken. Thereupon Mr. Henry MlUer, 
a member of both, the Actors* and Man- 
agers' Association announced that ho 
would have no dealings with the Actors*- 
Euulty Association if it attempted any 
-such restrictions, o J. the theatre. 

41 riiilgiil Tlisssssliss 
"Every manager present rose to Mr. 
Miller's support and pledged himself In 
unfaltering opposition to such • move or 
to any move that had the slightest tendency 
in this direction, 

"Tbe situation was made absolutely clear. 
The m a nag ers), were ready and willing to 
deal on any' fair basis or contract with 
the Actors' Equity Association, but they 
would not consent to any attempt to inter- 
fere in the enxaarins; of actors, who did 
not happen to belong to the Association. 

. "The result of this meeting was the ap- 
pointing of .an i actors* committee and a 
managers' committee on contract, 

( Co *Sin }ud -oa page 27) 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August. 13, -1919 



Will You ? 

tor o 



.'-•€«-\ 



'I 




VStikef 



help Will Rossiter put "over" this latest and greatest waltz song 

MlliubiikMi^ 



A 



natural harmony number by W. R. Williams who wrote "I'd Love to Live in Loveland" 
When the Moon Play Peek-a-boo" "When I Met You Last Night in Dreamland" etc. 



PROF. COPT and ORCH. FREE. Wffl Rosstter, "The Chicago Pobluher", 71 W. Rudolph St, Chicago, 111. 




CARLOS SEBASTIAN 






OLGA MYRA 

Arthur Anderson 
Present "BUBBLES," by Carlo* Sebastian and Arthur Anderson 



- ■: . .• • 



NEW BRIGHTON 



Direction — A. & A. Producing Co. 



r- 



** -~-0 l^fVBSTi 



« McCORMACK & MELLON harry 

>**•' SONGS, DANCES AND ECCENTRICITIES 

B. F. KEITH'S ROYAL, THIS WEEK, (AUG. 11) Directioo— H. BART McHUGH 



JUN E IV1IL.L. 





£.-*■ 

•~.ii 




■A- 

- f 

•■r 

i 



^5? 



WANTED— NOVELTY ACTS 

of all descriptions for CABARETS and 
REVUES— in and out of town 



MAX ROGERS, Agency 

Up Two Flight. 1544 Broadway. Now York 



^w2S"w££r * TOMMY LEVENE »SSSi5^3S& 

AND BB ... 

"Y-D- GIRLS' -CO" 

.:; •» -» 

*** .-a- . " ' . - . 

Wast* for Regular Season — Sister Team and Top Tenor for Quartette 
Would Like to Buy Chonu Wardrobe — Tack on Scenery 

Brewster Amusement Co., 230 Tremont St, Boston, Mass. 



>1 J CI 1 BS 






NONA/ BOOKING f 

DRAWING POPULATION OVER 300,000 . .*' 

LYCEUM 

PATERSON'S PERFECT THEATRE, PATERSON, N. J. 

Capacity 1900. Playing only Legitimate Attractions First Three days and 
Popular Price Shows the Last Three Days. For open time apply to 



Special Notice— Tab People 

Z am arranging three IS- people shows; open Aug 1 . 25th, rehearsals here. Want 6 sister acts, 
$ song and dance or sketch teams, 6 novelty teams, specialty people chorus girls, very little 
chorus work; 3 changes per week. . Can keep some people working during rehearsal. JOHN T. 
MeCASLIN, Bmtimore Theatrical Eacfaanre, 1» E. Baitiinote '4U" Baltimore, Mat 

•55 McCORMACK & SHANNON 5H 



.v.. August 13, 1919 



THE NEW r TX*RKCCLTPJ!ER 



25 



.*>•-- 




■OUTE 




_ -ATlt AND MUSICAL 

u»t Re* A This Office. Not Later 

Than Satur-aay 

"At 9 :45"— Plavbonae, New York, lndef. 
• (Closed by strike.) 
"Angel Face" — Colonial, Chicago, lndef. 
"Better 'Ole" — Mr. and Mrs. Coburn — Booth, 

N. T. City, lndef. 
' 'Boy 3 Will be Boys." — Ford's, Baltimore, Mi 

Aug. 18-86. 
I "Baddies" — Park 8q.. Boston, Mass., lndef. 

- "Breakfast In Bed" — Plymouth, Boston, 

Mass, 18. lndef. 
"Cappy Bicki" — Cort. Chicago, IlL, lndef. 
"Chu Chin Chow" — Century, New York, 'Aug. 

lndef. 

"The Challenge" — Selwyn. New York City, 

lndef. '" >: 
"Crimson Alibi" — Broadbnrst, .New York 

lndef, (Closed by strike.) 
Carmelo's -.Ted. Musical Comedy Co. — Bex, 
Omaha, pk, lndef. 
' "East Is Wes?'— Astor, New York City, In- 
f, > del. (Closed by strike.) 

"Erery Woman" — Snabert-Garrlck, Wash- 
ington, D. C Aug. 17-22. 
^••Flve Million, The"— Lyric, New -York City, 

■ lndef. (Closed by actors' strike.) 
Greenwich Village Follies— -Green wicb Vil- 
lage, N. Y., lndef. 

"Gaieties of 1919" — 44th. Street. New York 
City. (Closed by actors' strike. ) . . 

- "Honeymoon Town" — La Salle, Chicago, ln- 

def. 
;"I Lore Yon" — Cort, Chicago, DJ., lndef. 
-"I'll Bay She Does" — Shubert-Garrlck, Wash- 
¥£: lngton. D. C, Aug, 11-16. 
s /"John Ferguson" — Fulton, New York City, 

lndef. 
' "Ligh tain' "—Gayety, New York City, lndef. 

(Closed by actors' strike.) 
'.-"listen Lester" — Knickerbocker, New York 

City, lndef. - --■ .. ■ : 

: ■ "La La, Lndlle"— Henry Miller's, New York 
City, lndef. - 

"Lonely Borneo" — Shubert, New York, lndef. 
"Midnight Whirr— Centnry, New Toi*> dry, 

lndef. .:•-:--•...- 

"Monte Crlsto, Jr." — Winter Garden, New 

York City, lndef. 
"Nighty Night"— Princess,. New York City, 

- Aug-,7, lndef. (Closed by actors' strike.) 
"Ob, What a Girl" — Shnbert, New York, 

indef., 
"Oh. My Dear !" — Wilbur, Boston, lndef. 
"Peek-a-Boo" — Central, N. Y-. lndef. ' 
"Passing Show of 1918" — Palace, Chicago, 

lndef. ^ 

"Hoyal 'Vagabond, The" — Cohan * Harris, 
New York City, indef. 
• "BefOlaF Feller, A" — Cort, New York City, 
Index. 
"Scandal-— Garrick. Chicago, lndef. 
"-r "She's a Good Pellow" — Globe, New York 
City, lndef. (Closed by actors' strike.) 
"Sunshine" — Princess, Chicago. 11-16. . 
. : VScnndala of 1919"— Liberty, New York City. 
indef. | A 

Spanish Opera Co. — Cort, New York <Hty, 

indef. 
"Bee-Saw" — Tremont, Boston. Mass., indef. 
"Those Who Walk in Darkness" — 18th St., 
-J>'ew York City, Aug. 14,. lndef. . 
"Take It From Me" — Stndebaker, Chicago, • 
Aug. 17, lndef. 
. . "Thirty-nine East"— Marine Elliott, New 
. York City, indef. 

- "Up is Mabels Boom" — Wood's, Chicago, 
Sri' fiL, lndef. ..„.>.«•*, 

■ "Voice in the Dark. A"— Bepubllc, New 

York, lnttef. .•■ 

' "Zffefeld Follies"— New Amsterdam. Indef. 

; w ' XOLUMBIA WHEEL J.. ' 

Omaha, 18-23; 



H. 



, AJ- Bee v es' Show— Gayety, ,Oi 
. Gayety, Kansas City, 25-80. 

■ -Aha TTi ml IT R»ra<>—WaaAl 




Albany, 25-30. i< : 

. : 5 Ben Welch's Show — Gayety. St. Louis. 18- 
• { > 23 : Colombia, Chicago, 25-30. 
.-■ Behman Show — Hurtlg * Semon's, New- 
York, 18-23; Orphenm, Paterson, 28-80. 
Beauty Trust — Lay off, 18-23; Gayety, 
Omaha. 25-30. .xT. - - 

; Bill Watson's Parisian Whirl — Gayety, 

. Buffalo, 18-23 ; Gayety, Bochester, 25-30. 
. Bon tons — Olympic. Cincinnati, 18-28 ; ' Star 
and Garter, Chicago. 25-30. 
Bowery Burlesquera — Hurtle & Semon's, 
. ' •:■■ New York. 9-16 ; Empire. Brooklyn, 18-28 ; 
I-'" People's, Philadelphia, 25-80. 

Bostoman's — Buffalo, N. Y., 9-18; Gayety, 
Rochester. N. Y.. 18-23 : Bastable, Syra- 
Sf cose, 25-27; LnmWg. Dtlca, 28-30. 
J Burlesque Bevlew — Casino, Brooklyn, 18-28 ; 
i < Empire, Newark, 25-30. 

Burlesque Wonder Show — People's, PMla- 

, | delphia, 18-23 ; Palace, Baltimore, 25-30. 

Dave Marlon Bhow— Perth Amboy, N. J., 18; 

Plal nfleld, 19 ; Stamford, Com.. 20 ; Park, 

Bridgeport, 21-23; YorkriUe, New York, 

.,■": 25-30. 

• Follies of the Day — Empire, Newark, N. J., 

• ■ 18-23 ; Casino, Philadelphia, 25-30. 
,5 Girls A-La-Carte — Orphenm. Paterson, N. J., 
If 18-23; Majestic, Jersey City, 25-30. 
'■Girls de Looks — Palace, Baltimore, 18-23; 

-f -- Gayety, Washington, 25-30. 

-Girls of the TJ. S. A. — Pittsburgh, Fa., 9-16; 
Park. Tonnes town. O., 18-20: Grand. Ak- 
ron. O., 21-23: Star, Cleveland, 25-30. 
Golden Crooks — Detroit. 10-16 : Gayety, Tor- 
onto, Ont, 18-23; Gayety, Buffalo, 25-30. 

» 5 Harry Hastings' Show — Newburg, Poogb- 

!'■ keepsie, 18-23; Casino, Bolton, 25-30. 

-' HeUo America — Gayety, St Louis, 24-30. ' 



I 

■ y 



Hip- nip, Hoora*v*Bastable, -Syracuse, 18^20; 

Lew Kelly's Show— Newburg, #. Y., 14-16; 
Columbia, New York, 18-23; Casino, 
Brooklyn, 20-30. 

Liberty Girls— Paterson. N. J.. 0-16; Ma- 
jestic, Jersey City. N. J., 18-28 ; Perth 
Amboy. N. J.. 25; Plainfleld, 26; Stam- 
ford, Conn., 27; Park, Bridgeport, Conn., 
28-30. 

Maids of America — Grand, Hartford, Conn, 
18-23 : Jacques, Waterbory. Conn., 20-80. 

Million Dollar Dolls— Lyric, Dayton, O., 18- 
23; Olympic, Cincinnati, 25-30. 

MoUle Williams' Co. — Casino. Boston, 18-28; 
Grand, Hartford, Conn.. 25-80. ■ 

Oh! Girl— Empire, Albany, N. Y., 18-23; 
Boston, 25-80. 

Peek-a-Boo— Gayety, St. Louis. Mo., 81-Bept. 
6. - . 

Roseland Glrla — Star, Cleveland, 18-28; Em- 
pire, Toledo, 25-80. . 

Bose Sy dell's London Belles — Gayety, De- 
troit, 18-.28 ; Gayety. Toronto, Can.. 25-80. 

Sam Howe's Show — Casino, - Philadelphia, 
18-28; Hurtlg and Semon's, New York, 
25-30. 

Sight Seers— Casino, Boston, 0-16; Jacques, 
Waterbury, Conn.. 18-23 : New York, 25-80. 

Social Maids— Palace, Baltimore, 9-18: 
Gayety, Washington, 18-23; Gayety, Pitts- 
burgh, 25-80. 

Sporting -Widows— Miner's 149th St., New 
York. 18-23; Brooklyn, 25-80. . 

Star and Garter Shows — Star A Garter, 
Chicago, 18-23; open, 25-80. 

Step lively Girls— Albany, N. Y_ 11-16; 
Gayety, Boston, 18-28; Columbia, New 
York, 25-30. 

Twentieth Century Maids— Toledo, O., 10-16: 
Columbia. Chicago, 17-28. 

Victory Belles — Star, Cleveland, 9-16: Em- 
pire. Toledo. 18-23: Lyric, Dayton, 25-80. 

-AMERICAN WHEEL 

All Jan Bevlew — Empire, Cleveland, 18-28. 
Broadway Belles — Empire, Indianapolis, 

I Beauty Revue — Englewood, Chicago, 17-28. 
Cabaret Girls — Standard, St. Louis, 17-28. 
Cracker Jacks— Star, Brooklyn. 16-28. 
Dixon's Big Bevlew — Gayety, Newark. 18-23. 
Edmond Hayes' Show — Newburg. N. Y., 

21-28. 
French Frolics — Empire, Indianapolis, 10- 

16; Gayety. Louisville, 17-28. 
Follies of Pleasure — Scranton, 9-16; Wilkes- 

bsrre. 18-23. - 

Girls from Follies— Gayety, Baltimore, 9-16; 

Penn Circuit. 18-28. 
Grown tip Babies — Sioux City, Iowa, 17-28. 
Glrla from Joy land — Wllkesbarre, Pa., 9-16; 

Scranton, 18-28. 
Jan Babies — Olympic, New York, 16-28. 
Ud Lifters— Empire, Cleveland, 8-10; De- 
troit, 18-23. 
Midnight Maids— Binghamton. N. Y.. 18-20; 

Niagara. Fans, 21-23. 
Mischief Makers— Niagara Falls, K. T.. 14- 

18: one night era Into St. Louis, 18-23. 
Monte Carlo Girls — Englewood, ■ Chicago, 

10-16: one night ers, 17-23. 
2? F ^S?. chy Sr a *' w ^' Milwaukee, 17-23. « 

Pat White Show— Gayety, MUwankee, 10-16; 

Gayety, Minneapolis, 18-23. m 

Bessie Dassle— BQon, Philadelphia, 16-28. 
Bound the Town— Trenton, N. J., 15-16: 

Gayety. Brooklyn, 18-28. 
Sliding Billy Watson — Star, Toronto, Ont, 

Social Follies — Howard, Boston, 18-23. » 

Tempters— Cadillac Detroit, 10-16; Hay- 
market, . Chicago^ T-23. 



"SfiS 



Al. G. FIHda — Bo ch e ste rV- 14-16. 

— emeu* ROUTES 

ig Bros. A Barnum k Bailey's Circus, 
Chicago, ni., 9-VK -., JF" ' 
Al G. Barnes — Murphysboro, HI., 18: Belle- 
ville, 14 ; East St. Louis, 10; Litchfield, 

'.•»-. STOCKS 

Albee Stock. Providence, B. I., indef. 

Arlington Theatre Co. — Boston, Mass., ln- 
def. 

Alcasar Flayers— Alcasar, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Baker Flayer* — Portland, Ore., lndef. 

Blauey Stock— YorkriUe, New York City. 

Belgrade. Sadie — New Bedford, Mass., lndef. 

Besaey, Jack. Stock— Peoria, DL, lndef. 

Brissac, Virginia, Stock — Strand. San Diego, 
Cal., lndef. 

Brown, George, Stock — Whalen Park, Fitch- 
burg, Mass., indef. 

Booth, Nellie, Players— Pittsburgh, Pa., In- 
def. 

BrowneB-Stock — Dayton, O., lndef. 

Brers, Fred, Stock — Waverly, N. Y.. lndef. 

Chicago. Stock — Altoona, Pa., lndef. 

Crawford. Ed.. Stock— Bath. Me., lndef. 

Colonial Stock— Plttsfleld, Mass., lndef. 

Colonial Stock — Cleveland, O.. Indef. 

Dominion Players — Winnipeg, Manitoba, 
Can., lndef. 

Durkin Stock — Skowhegan. Me., lndef. 

Desmond, Mae, Players — Scranton, Pa., in- 
def. 

Del Lawrence Co. — Majestic, San Francisco, 
Cal., lndef. 

Enterprise Stock Co. — Green Say, Wis., In- 
Forest 'Park Musical Stock— St. Louis, Mo. 

Grand ■ Theatre Stock Co. — Tulsa, 0Ul, ln- 
•=det. : 

Gardner Bros. Stock Co. — Palace. Oklahoma. 
City, Okla.. indef. - ' 

{Continued on page 33.) 



I 



? 



a«i 



22ZS 





The American Hercules 

Late Physical Instructor of the United States Navy 

. Thi. week (Au«. 11) Keith's Riverside 
Next week (Aug. 18) Keith , » Wasriirigton 

• ' . Direction — Frank Evans .4 



i^a^mztmB^^^agaaaaaaagaaB^aamfeazzazazgBzmgBgii^Ezaaga 



AT LIBERTY FOR NEXT SEASON 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES E. COATTA 



BCssstaal Csaaady, B uil se uu a at* KapaiHahai Lady— Characters, Heavies or Gen. Bus. Gent— Small 
Parts and Specialties. We hare an Al Feature Musical Act. Thai P— pis with the Qrsat Eise- 
Meal fhlin Address MR. JAMES E. COATTA, N*. 144 W. Sstsssaat, Oswaaa, N. Y. 



Wanted for The Maddocke- 

Park Players 



Permanent stock, one bill a week, opening September L 

Man, two Gassatll Buuia*a* Acton; A-l scens*< artist (small parti) and 

Long engagement to right .people. Send late photos and full particulars. Address F. L. 
MA0OOCX3, M*|tttk TUtn, Binas^gksex Ala. 



Jack Lane, wire people engaged. Advise when to send transportation I CostrHo. I lost 
address People who work before write again. 



Wanted for The Trumbull Stock 'Co. 

An experienced Ingenue Leading Woman, ability and" wardrobe essential. Other 
people write. This, company play-s-'New Yprk and Penn., regular season. State 
^tr salary, send phofoeraphs and programs .jn first letter. : Address%I<AW- 
;NCE R. TRUMBULL, Sooth West Harbor, Maine. 



WANTED 

Comedians, Straight Men, Singers, Chora* Girl*, Specialty People. 
All week stands. Wire HOYTS REVIEW, Carol. Theatre, Rome, 
New York. 



AL 



MYRTLE 



MARDO & L0RENZ 



The Wop and Th* Girl 



la Vauslawia. 



HUBERT KINNEY & CORINNE 

assegais] eel Dan cing Dir e cti o n Rosa H a Stsrwstrt 



26 



T H T KEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13, 1919 



,£..:.-s;^ ■>&: fete >»&*? fe§ ''■w^:i'T-:----'"-*- ■■>;'■■&•■-.:■. * ■ " vt-* ■*• '^ ;^«^'-'4i«x«-»?^S8&^4W 



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^>T ; ' ' -&ftc-w '*./*: Wz& "?5 ~ - * *; : Vi^ '■ ;'; ■ r>/:.. ■ .' • . ~. ,:•_.,.. "--.-"■ ,; : ..~ .... . .- ;;-;■;,-,',.■■. >.-■:•"":•'■ ■'■•-.■ '/-' '-.'•--- -, ;'^- 

expression to its sense of tlie loyalty and good conscience of those mem- 
^#fJ)CT8-:df the acting profession, wholiaye declined to compromise their^in- 
... ^dmdual freedpnras artists, and to ; break- contracts, which have been fairly 
j&IMa^ffreely-enter^ them. '• r 

^ CTE PRODU^ hereby jgives 

^Igo^bee- to all whom it concerns, that it will steadfastly stand by those 















';' 5 " 



.■;-v 






. 1" ,: ^ ^ 



%embers v of the : theattfcal ^ prof ession, who are loyally standing by the true, 
interests ot' ^e^ihea|rer^d ^s ^ in ^ the discreditable strike ^pw^in 






yS" 



- • -. ■'-i-.-.i^irts. *ijfcr*fcW>«;tC 



- ----cw^,. ■*.-*>'.— nji ii^CiC-. 



■ r-'i. : 

: 



pgym ^ bei.as^p 

;. ^MI^eblawotr". iff 7 s 

1CE0. BROADHTJRST • 

WINTHRbP AMES / 1 ] v OOMSTOCK 









•.:te.*.U'"vJ3 



ViGEORGE p. TYLER 
GEO, m: COHAN V 






( ^,#ATJVi-HAYMAN 



:• ■*. 









— • LEE SHI; BERT - ■ - ~" v ^' ) p^^^«' i * i ^^MA"Rf!' a 'tCf-;A 'W • 

■-ftWMi A.-. BRADY -C'^- "*¥ ■ j^TrvcrKr. tr ^^^Trunvr --■V''-^' 

•^ |^MI£raCT^^-«||^^^ ZIEGFELD^^; 
'.' \ !^ARTHTJR BAMMERSTEIN ^ ^- " Al-'C:- 7 - 

^ARTHDR HOPKINS %: .^T^^'^S^^tf 
ShAS. EMERSON GOOKE-r^^^^^^ 

* ' ir3 W : WALTER R WANGER 



-1 



EDW. MACGREGOR M 5 ^^ e RIGHARD HERNDON 






ABE LEVY 



RICHARD WALTON TULLY 



. j tin 



MORRIS GEST 
HARRKON GREY EJSKE 
JsAM : H. HARRIS A : A : -C^ 

-henry w^satageH;^; 
edgar selwyn ; 

a. el woods *&0 : ; ; ; j; 

WM; HARRIS, JR. , I r 

.^-LAWRENdE" WEBER ^ 
OLIVER MOROSCO i % 

■ CHA& ; GOBURN ' , < % ? W^^^^B 



ADOLPH KXAUBER v 

x;eo. WHITE 

MORAN Sl ANDREWsL 






■ 




. -*•' - VS;^ - TiS-Slfiffil 






•ft :. . •. \ .-. 



August 13, 1919 



THE NEW YORK .CLIPPER 



27 



I 



ti$*9<*s$f ! arim? 



STAGE HANDS WONTT STRIKE WITH ACTORS, WITHOUT GIVWG NOTICE 

(Continued rom pages 3 and 23) 



ft "Several day* later these committees met 
. and practically all the points of the new 
; contract were agreed upon. It- was de- 

- elded that each committee should draft 
tentative contracts, these to be merged at 

! a' second meeting;. The second meeting was 
'•" never held, Frank Gilmore, secretary of 
the Actors'- Equity Association, delivered 
■ ' to Henry W. Savage, chairman of the Maji- 
agers' Association, a form of contract. 
. which he said was final and all the Actors' 
v Equity Association would accept. Mr. 
i Savage asked Mr. Gilmere if he meant that 
■' the managers' refusal to agree to this con- 
tract would mean an attempt on the part 
of the Actors' Equity Association to en- 
force the 'closed shop,' and Mr. Gilmore's 

- reply was that the managers' failure to 
i agree would force the Actors' Equity As- 
sociation to extreme : measures and the 

■ 'closed shop' might be among them. 

Rece i ved Ultimatum 
"Then the attempt instituted by the man- 
- 1 agera to reach an amicable arrangement 
between actor and manager, with the man- 
ager willing and anxious to deal with a 
i collective body, of actors resulted In an 
'ultimatum from' the Actors' Equity Asso- 
B elation accompanied by a threat of ex- 
:: treme measures, which they faithfully lived 
§ up to in' the past few days. 
S "With cessation of negotiations the man- 
agers drafted a contract following the con- 
I tract which the Actors' Equity Association 
had drafted and operated under for three 
years. ... 

••The arbitration clause In the Actors' 

V Equity Association contract is as follows; 
i! ■: "'The parties hereto In consideration of 
9 said employment and hiring, and of the 

mutual promises herein contained, agree 
for their mutual benefit and protection that 
'■:■ In the event of any dispute or disagreement 
-: in respect to a claim for salary or damages 
', for alleged wrongful discharge, before a 
'.'". right of action shall accrue, it shall be sub- 
S nutted to arbitration, to ascertain and de- 
ft tormi..e what sum, if any, la due for salary 
' or damages. - 
0? "'The arbiters shall be two disinterested 
'persons to.be chosen from among persons 
engaged in the theatrical profession (one 
, by each of the parties hereto), and the' two 
-80 chosen shall first elect a competent, dis- 
interested .umpire. The two arbiters to- 
gether shall then estimate and fix the 
3 amount of salary or damages, it any, and, 
< failing to agree shall submit the matter to 
: the umpire. The award In writing of any 
r two shall determine the amount of - such 

V salary or damages, - 

■ t " "The parties hereto shall pay the arbi- 
ters respectively selected by them, they 
shall bear equally the expense of the 
arbitration and the umpire. 

" 'The arbiters and umpire shall be ap- 

- pointed ten days after notice, and shall, 
.'within one week after their appointment, 

meet to hear and determine the differences 
which have arisen; it being provided, how- 
ever, that If the actor be a member in 
good standing of the Actors' Equity Asso- 
'ciation. and the manager a member In good 

'Standing of the United Managers' Protec- 
tive Association, then, in that event, it 
Is agreed by the parties hereto, that the 
respective arbiters shall be selected by these 
respective organizations. . - 

'■.'■ "Should suit be brought before the se- 
lection of arbiters, the party sued may, at 

-.any time alter suit, and before trial, give 
notice of his desire for an arbitration and 

:: choose an arbiter as herein provided. 

!" "The arbitration clause in the Managers' 
Producing Association contracts Is as fol- 
lows: • 

;.' "The parties hereto in consideration of 
"Bald employment and hiring, and of- the 

"mutual promises herein contained, agree 
for their mutual benefit and- protection that 
in the event of any dispute or disagreement 
(1) as to any matter or thing covered by ' 
this contract; (2) as to the meaning of 
the contract or Its application to any state 
of facts which may arise, then said dispute 

- or claim shall be arbitrated. The managers 
shall -choose one arbitrator and the actors 
the second. 

Provides for A rb i ter* 

"The arbiter* shall be two disinterested 
persons to be chosen from among persons 
engaged in the theatrical profession (one 
by each of the parties hereto), and the two 

■ so chosen shall first elect a competent dis- 
interested umpire. The two arbiters to- 
gether shall then estimate and- fix the 
amount of salary or damages, if any, and 

.failing to agree, shall submit the matter 
to the umpire. The award in writing of any 

'two shall determine the amount of such 
salary or damages. 

"The parties hereto shall pay the arbi- 
ters respectively selected by them, and 
they shall bear equally the expense of the 
arbitration and the umpire. "" 

- -"Should suit be brought before the se- 
lection of arbiters, the party sued may, at 
any time after suit and before that, give 
notice of his desire for an arbitration and 
choose an arbiter as herein provided. 

- "It will be noted that there is nothing in 
the manager's contract to prevent an actor 
from soliciting the Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion or member thereof as his arbitrator, 
moreover there la nothing In the clause to 
prevent the several arbitrators from select- 
ing the Actor's Equity or a member there- 
of as the final arbitrator. It is important 
that the fact should be known that actors 



who 'walked out' had signed Actors' Equity 
Association contracts with their managers, 
had not notified their managers of an in- 
tention to strike, and have shown by their 
action that the signing by them of the 
Actors' Equity Association contract la not 
a guarantee of an intention to live up to 
the terms of an agreement. On the other 
hand, had the managers failed to fulfil these 
contracts, as the actors have done, they 
would have been liable for every dollar 
of salary Involved In the terms of the con- 
tract. 

Point of Difference 

"The chief point of difference between the 
actors and managers was the eight per- 
formance clause. The managers had 
brought much evidence to show that this 
was a demand they could not comply with 
In many case*. As further evidence of 
his good faith Mr. Wilson publicly offered 
to submit this clause to the arbitration of 
former President Taft and Charles E. 
Hughes, knowing full ' well that the man- 
agers could not honestly enter Into such 
arbitration since they could not afford to 
abide by an adverse decision, and about 
all- that any striking. actor can dffer. today . 
as a grievance is 'the managers wouldn't 
arbitrate." 

"To further make forever impossible any 
relationship between, the managers and the 
Actors' Equity Associations Mr. Wilson 
took into his councils two notorious agi- 
tators and troublemakers, who before their 
downfall had created great havoc in the 
vaudeville profession. The mark of these 
men Instantly appeared In public vlHtflca- 
tlon of managers and haranguing of actors, 
scurrilous attacks in their only published] 
mouthpiece, and as a grand climax the 
strike, complete repudiation ' of. Actors' 
Equity contracts by which the managers 
were faithfully abiding, vulgar street dis- 
plays. $500-a-week actors accosting ftO-a- 
week chorus girls at stage doors and asking 
them to go out In sympathy, threats of as- 
sault on managers, wrecking of theatres; 
vilest of all. anonymous letters, and the 
completest demonstration of all the misery 
an unscrupulous agitator can create, par- 
ticularly when he has as his plaything an 
unusually emotional class. 

Calls Equity Actor's Enemy 

"So far as the managers are concerned the 
Actors' Equity Association has proved It- 
self the enemy of the actor and the man- 
ager. . No contract with any .of its mem- 
bers can ever be considered anything better 
than an obligation that can be canceled 
by the Actors' Equity Association at thirty 
minutes' notice, for the actor is no longer 
free. There Is a power above him that 
tells him when and where he may not 
work. He has no right to make an indi- 
vidual contract since he cannot be sure that 
he can fulfill it, 

- "It has ceased to be a struggle between 
the actor and the manager. The manager 
must fight now to deliver the actor from 
the grip of unscrupulous agitators and 
restore him to a position of some persona] 
liberty. ' ' 

"The producing Managers' Association 
will continue to keep the theatres open and 
will give performances; they will have no 
quarrel; nor have they had any quarrel 
with organised labor, a fact which is clearly 
proven by the continued good relations that 
exist between the manager, antk the union 
of stage bands, musicians, etc. The Pro- 
ducing Managers' Association J.eplores a 
strike in this Industry at the present time, 
when there is so much -unrest throughout 
the country." 



EQUITY ISSUES ANSWER TO - 

MANAGERS' STATEMENT 

A statement, in reply to the one Issued by 
the managers was Issued Monday afternoon 
by .the Equity. It follows: 

"The Prodadng Managers' Association in- 
vited the officers and Council of the Actors' 
Equity Association to an Informal luncheon 
at the Clarldge on May 2. 

"There they announced, through Mr. Win- 
throp Ames, that they were dissatisfied with 
the present form of contract and wished for 
some changes. We also wished for some 
-changes and a committee was appointed 
from each organization to agree upon those 
changes. 

"When the committees met, although we 
did not definitely agree to all the concessions 
they asked, no insurmountable difficulty 
arose until we asked that 'eight perform- 
anees should constitute a week's work; all 
extra performances to be paid for pro rata.' 
Their committee told ns that seven out of 
eight of that committee had already voted 
that that request be granted, but that it 
had been voted down In their Council by a 
two-thirds majority. 

"Neither committee bad power to act and 
so reported back to their respective Coun- 
cils. Subsequently, an emissary from the 
managers came to us and asked If the Coun- 
cil stood flrm on the 'eight performances* 
clau s e He was told that they did. 

"Meantime, the Equity Council decided on 
a 'quid pro quo' that It felt the managers 
would gladly accept, and Its committee was 

given power to act; 

"To our amazement, the managers broke 
off all negotiations abruptly and announced 
they would have nothing further to do with 
the Actors' Equity Association. 

"We approached them again and again, 
suggesting that the point* In dispute be sub- 



mitted to arbitration. We even went so far 
as to secure the promise of ex-President Taft 
and ex-Governor Hughes to act a* arbiters 
if requested. We suggested that three rep- 
resentative* of each association should meet 
and discuss the disputed points, and that 
Messrs. Taft and Hughes should be umpires. 
All these offers were flatly rejected by the 
managers, who announced publicly that they 
were determined to destroy the Actors' 
Equity Association. ; ■ 

•'We then affiliated ourselves with the 
American Federation of Labor, who granted 
us a. charter as a branch of the Associated 
Actors and Artistes of America. This char- 
ter gives the Actors' Equity Association full 
autonomy and absolute control over. its own 
policy. 

"As soon as it was granted us, we again 
approached the managers, renewing oar offer 
to submit all disputed points to arbitration, 
and offering further that if the arbitration 
were decided in our favor we would not ask 
for the new contract to be put in force until 
the season of 1020-1921, thus giving the 
managers a year to adjust- their builness to 
the new conditions. 

"This was also flatly refused and again 
the managers announced that they would 
never deal with the Actor*' Equity Associa- 
tion. '..,•- ...... 

"The managers - have claimed at various 
times that their reason for attacking the 
Actors' Equity Association was: 

"Their objection to Francis Wilson. 

"Our unreasonable demand*. 

"Our affiliation with labor. 

"The dictatorship of Harry Mountford in 
the A. IS. A 

"Our breach of contracts. 

"Some of them now deny that they . ob- 
jected to our entering labor. They told us 
repeatedly we would be degraded by so 
doing. '.,:• 

"Neither Mr. Mountford nor any other 
non-member has any voice In the policies 
of the Actors' Equity Association. No one 
has a right even to adtite ns except on our 
express invitation. 

■'Now, as to the breach of contracts: 
Clause -18' in the 'Equity' contract calls for 
arbitration In case of dispute between the 
Actors' Equity Association and the manager. 

"Their new contract call* for arbitration 
between actor and manager. In other words, 
they Insist on dealing with the actor aa an 
individual and deny Elm the right of organ. 
Izing for his protection. 

"All the members of the Producing Man- 
agers' Association have announced that Uiey 
will not recognize the Actors' Equity Asso- 
ciation. Therefore, they have publicly stated 
that they will not comply with clause '18' 
of the 'Equity' contracts thst they have' 
signed. 

"When a party to a contract announces 
that he will not abide by It, that party has 
broken the contract. 

"Exbcctivb Council or TBI A. E. A 
"Per Frank Gilmore." 



i! 



PLAN BENEFITS TO RAISE 

STROKE FUND FOR ACTORS 

It was announced at strike headquarters 
early this week that a large sum In volun- 
tary contributions had been received by the 
Equity since the strike was called last 
Thursday. Many checks, it was said, began 
coming In by mail from members of the 
profession and also from individuals not con- 
nected In any way with the profession but 
sympathetic to the cause. 

It was announced that an initiation fee 
of (5 will become effective Sept. l. On 
January 1 it is to be increased to $10. The 
$10 a year dues charged will remain the 
same. 

It was also announced that Francis Nil- 
son had donated $2,000 to a strike fund. 

The largest amount received up to Mon- 
day of this week, it was announced, was 
contributed by Mr. and Mrs. Bheldon Lewis 
(Virginia Pearson), both of whom ore ap- 
pearing in motion- pictures at present, Last 
Friday, Pedro De Cordoba contributed $100 
to the strike fund. . 

JUSt bOW much money the Equity As- 
sociation has on hand with which to con- 
duct the strike could not be learned. There 
were rumors thst wealthy sympathizers had 
offered to raise a fund If necessary, but 

these could not be confirmed at the Equity 
Association offices. There, it was said that 
elaborate plans were being made for a series 
of benefit performances to be given In aval], 
able places throughout the city, and in the 
event that theatres could not be secured 
one of the armories or Madison 8qnare Gar- 
den would be utilised for the purpose. 

Thus for, none of the striking actors has 
made application for financial aid, but, at 
the Equity offices, it was said that $5 was 
given to a chorus girl who refused to con- 
tlnue work with a show owned by a mem- 
ber of the Managers' Association. The girl 
came over and Joined the Equity Association 
and stated that the manager of the ahow In 
which she had been rehearsing had refused 
to pay her Are dollars that was coming to 
b *?> ■_ T i? e name of the girl, the show in 
which she wss rehearsing and the name of 
the manager, waa not divulged. 

PROMINENT PLAYERS JOIN 

AND QUIT THE EQUITY 

Prominent player folk have announced 

during the last few days that they have 

espoused and will support the Actors' cause. 

Among them are the following ■ 

Raymond Hitchcock, who sent a telegram 
to the Equity reading: "The rumor that I 
was preparing to replace a striking actor 1* 



absolutely false. I am still a member of the 
Association. It can command me." 

John. Drew, who also read a letter written 
by Ms niece, Ethel Barrymore. In which aha 
not only pledged her - support, but also the 
support of her two brothers, Lionel and 
John Barrymore. The following Is Miss 
Ba rry m ore'a letter: 

"While my entire theatrical career has 
been associated with but one managamant; 
from which I have received only fairness 
and consideration, I feel that the traditions 
of my family ally me logically and Irredeem- 
ably with the members of my profession in 
' the Actors' Equity Association.' 4 

Al JoUoa Joins 

Others ate Al Jolson, the tour Doolays. 
Harry Fox, Frank Fay, Ed Wynn, Ann PeA- 
nington, Gertrude Vanderbllt. 

There ware also a number of prominent 
players who resigned from the Equity, also 
the list including- the following: E. H. 
Sothexn, Holbrook Bllnn, »«"»» - WlngKsm 
Zelda Sears, the wife of Tu C. Wtswefl. a*. 
soelated with' the Managers' Protective As- 
sociation : Laura Hope Crews, Janet Beecher, 
Valli Valll, Olive Wyndbam, Jeannette Low- 
tie, Charlotta Monterey, Gladys "'— ", 
William Couier and Lester Lonergan, ' th* 
latter two of whom each sent a latter. Mr. 
Collier's resignation waa a* follows: : . 
. . _ "New York. August B, 19M. 
"Actor's Equity Association. 
"Attention of Mr. Grant Btewart; 
"1472-1476 Broadway, 
"New York City. 

"Gentlemen— I hereby tender my resigna- 
tion from the Actors' Equity Association, a* • 
I am very much adverse to their action la 
closing up theatres;' in fact, by ordering a 
so-called strike. Tours truly, 

"Paid, Wiuux Colums." 

Mr. Lonergan's was as follows: 
"My Dear Mr. Gilmore: . 

"Pleaas to accept my resignation from ' 
the -Actor*' Equity Association. 

"Perhaps is tenderlac the above, I should . 
add a line to cover my position, notwith- 
standing that I have always kept it clear 
to yon and I believe tenable. 

"I deplore the Inconceivable catastrophe 
which his been precipitated and which, ni* 
reduced the romantic realm of the itin to 
the mundane level of the street carbarn. 
In our 'beginnings,' the stage meant to us 
all a - place of illusion. . We were aware of 
It* material disadvantages, but we gladly 
dared. 

"The illusion is now dead. I can hear a 
groan, 'Et to. Brute ?' -as the dying muse 
looks sadly on the frenzied face of the Ac- 
tors' Equity Association. 

"Most sincerely yours, 

"LxaTsa Losksoju*." 

An announcement came from the man- 
agers' publicity department that B. Lyall 
Swete. the English aetoii and stage director 

of His Majesty's Theatre. London, who 
came to supervise the production of "Chu • 
Chin Chow,'' at the Century had resigned 
from the Equity. 

Mr. Swete Joined the Actor's Equity Asso- 
ciation when he arrived In New York be- 
cause he Is a member of the Actor's Asso- 
ciation of Great Britain. When the strike 

of "Can Chin Chow" waa called Mr. Swete 
continued to rehearse "Chu Chin Chow" re- 
gardlex* and It waa do*" to hi* direction that 
"Chu Chin Chow" was successfully presented 
at the Century and I* running there now. 
Mr. Swete yesterday sent the following let- 
ter to- Frank GUlmore. secretary, resigning 

• from the Actor'* Equity Association. 

"Having read Mr. Nathan Burkon's letter 
of August 10th to you on the present crisis, 

' I also must Insist that my name be erased 
from the list of membership of the Actor's t 
Equity Association' of -America, and that my ' 
resignation be accepted from tils date. I 
am cabling the Secretary of the Actor's As- 
sociation of Great Britain my reasons for 
resigning from the Equity Association of 
America, and entreating his Council to pause 
before further committing its members out 
here to a course which is contrary to the 
laws or the United States. 

With kindest regard*. 
( Signed) B. LYA lST 8WBTB." 

SUNN'S NAME HEADS 

ACTOR'S "DISLOYAL LIST" 

On Saturday, officials of the Equity 
caused a "Disloyal Ust" to be conspicu- 
ously displayed on the wall In the meeting 
room of the strike headquarters established 
by the organization at 160 West Forty-Fifth 
Street. This list was the result of Hol- 
brook Bllnn'* action In forsaking the actor** 
organisation and going over with the man- 
agers on Friday night, when he rejoined the 
cast of "The Challenge" and appeared In 
the show. 

.When it waa learned that the Selwyn 
Theatre wa* forced to return the audience 
It* money, which amounted to 116*2. on 
Thursday night, primarily through Bllnn's 
refusal to appear in the play, he being a 
member of the A. E. A, at the time, salvos 
of applause greeted the announcement at 
the organization'* headquarters. The next 
uay. Friday, wherever Bllnn went and hap- 
pened to meet his actor friends and ac- 
quaintances he was patted on the back 
and complimented on the consistent stand 

be took In the matter. And even on Friday 
night, as late as 6:30. at the Lambs Club 
be was still receiving the congratulations 
of his actor friends. It was at this time 
that he shook hands with Jefferson De 
{Continued on page 29) 



.28 



«e>dUS*< 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13>- 1919 



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All members of the Actors' Equity Association sxe personally liable for all damages and losses to the 
by die strike* 

DO NOT BE MISLED— CONSULT YOUR OWN LAWYER. 



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Attention is called to the following letter sent. by Mr. Nathan Bnrfcan to the Actors' Equity Association; ; copy of which 
was transmitted to Mr. John L. Golden by Mr. Burfcan. 

.' -".' ■ ■■"""' .-.\r .V '.-: v.' , ~ 






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August 10, 1919. 
Mr. Frank Gillmore, Executive Secretary, Actors' Equity Association, New York City: 

My dear Mr. Gillmore — My attention -was called last night to a list of your membership, in which was included my name as a life member. 
In view of the strike called against the enterprises managed by my clients, Messrs. Winchell Smith and John Golden and Charles Dillingham, 
respectively, and in view of the action of the organizers of the' strike in wilfully bringing about the breaking by .members of your association of contracts' 
-, of service 'existing with Messrs. Smith and Golden and Dillingham, respectively, which have long, periods to run, and particularly in view of the fact that 
Messrs. Smith and Golden and Dillingham respectively have at all times and on all occasions treated their players with the utmost consideration, justice 
and fairness, as the striking players as well as all other players associated with them will admit, and against whom the players can have no legitimate 
grievance,. I must insist that my name be forthwith stricken from your membership roll. . 

The action of the organizers of the strike in knowingly and wilfully ordering players under w ii t lcn c o ntracts of employment with these managers- 
to leave their employers and break up their attractions, manifests an utter and wilful disregard not only of law and order, but of the welfare of your mem- 
bership, as well as of the rights of these managers, and it also b etrays crass s t upidi ty on the part of the officers of your association in permitting such acta 
"to be voiiiniilled. 

Let me call your attention to the decision of the Appellate Division . of this* Department in the case of Gra s si Contracting Co. v. Bennett, 174 Al ~D. , 
page 249, where the court held that - \_" • ' 

r It ^. not lawful to call a strike, the' result of which win be the violation of c ontrac ts of its members with their employers; and the United States 
Supreme" Court," m Hitch man Coal & Coke Co. v. Mitchell, 245 U. S., page 229, held that a combination to procure concerted breaches of contract by plain- . 
tiffs employees is as plainly unlawful as if it involved a breach of the peace. 

In that case the members of a union were enjoined from inducing or seeking to induce the plaintiff's employees from violating their contracts of 
employment. The Court, in protecting those contracts, said, at page 251: 

- r"9Plaintiff , -having in the exercise of its undoubted rights, established a working agreement between it and its employees, with- the free assent 
of the latter, is entitled to be protected in the enjoyment of the resulting status, as in any other legal right That the employment was at will and 
terminable by either party at any time is of no consequence." . 

"The right of tction for persuading an employee to leave lua employer is universally recognized.'* 

Applying this principle to the nets involved in 'the strike, the strike organizers, the officers of the Actors' Equity Association, and its mem- 
bership, were and are guilty of unlawful acts in directing, inducing, persuading or coercing players under contractual relations with managers to strike, 
to break their contract, and not to play at scheduled performance*. The contract need not be for any specific period (although I know of my own per- '■ 
sonal knowledge that a great many of the contracts are for long terms, and- some have a two weeks' notice clause). '.'■' 'ir 

In justice* to the many players who are members of. the association and who do not realize the consequences of the acts of the organizers 
of the strike, .and the officers of the association, in permitting the organizers to commit the acts which the courts have pronounced illegal, let me call 
^~ybs»' attention to the famous Danbury Hatters' case, known as Lawlor v. Loewe, 235 U. S., 522. - ;".'. "•- ,£.-. '•?£..: 

" ! In that case the members of a labor union attempted to compel a hat manufacturer to unionize his factory, left his employment and prevented • 

others from Tfaking employment therein, and with the assistance of members of affiliated organizations declared a "boycott" on his goods. The courf held 
'■ that all the members of the labor union who paid their dues were jointly liable with the officers of the union for the damages sustained by their acts. It is ' 
•' not TSfj-j*" 1 that each member of the Union should have knowledge of the details of the action proposed to be taken by the strike organizers 'afzid the officers 
of the Onion. . * • * : : '■"*'.' '-*■ 'l '.:--«*•.' ■ •« 

The court said, on page S29; ' " .-.:■• - . ../.'. stn- *'■ / ' ji 

"The individnal members are liable as principals for what their officers did in the performance of their duty, even though they did not know of the 
particular sets done, or may have disapproved of or have forbidden it." 
In that case the plaintiff recovered a judgment for tW?,fl(K>00, and many of tile members of the Union had their bank accounts attached, their prop- 
erty sold at public sale under execution, and many were obliged to pay whatever they had, to make good the damage. 

The damages in such cases are not apportioned, but each member is liable individually and collectively for the .entire damage done,. and if he has •' 
?. sufficient property, he must make good the entire damage. ^.. 

It is beyond dispute now. that very serious -damage has been inflicted upon a number of managers by the closing of their theatres. The damages are 
not speculative, because the managers will be entitled to recover for moneys refunded by them to patrons who were deprived of the opportunity to see the 
attraction, moneys paid as rent for the theatre while it remained dark, moneys paid to employees who had to be laid off in consequence of the strike, moneys 
paid for advertising, current expenses, and possible losses wherever they can ; be established. _ jv . = ■;■_ 

The resulting damage of tins strike may run into ■aTJataan of dollars, and all those players who have contracts with Managers as wen' as the officers - 
and strike organizers, and the individnal members of tins association, though they did not participate in or had any knowledge of the strike, may, within a 
short period of *""», find themselves involved in a serious predicament. By the action of the organizers of the strike and the officers of your association, the ' 
life savings of many players have already been jeopardized. . . 

I think it is your duty to at once direct all players who have walked out in breach of their' contracts to return' and to minim i z e the damage as far as; 
possible. ••= _■; • ■'-*»-.' , ■ ' . : i-; "-'• ' ; >' t v "--.''■''- .•*/' . ".' . ,'~ '.-.! -';-.^ 



This letter is written, not with the idea of giving you advice, but simply to justify my action. 



- =-1 



Very truly' yours, . 

NATHAN BURKAN. 



igust 13, 1919 



T H ENEW TOR K CLIPPER 



29 



^sis-im^s*^^ actors, without giving notice 

(Continued from pages 3, 23 and 27) ' .- _ 



.■,-.. ....IS. 

rella and EcbUn Gayer, both of whom 
itively state that Bllnn gave,ttoem his 
-d of honor that he -would not) appear 
"The Challenge" and would stick with 

A. E. A. However, Blinn did appear 
t very night In the play, announcing 
t, since he had an Interest .In the play. 
waa morally and legally bound to abtde 
the managerial interest that called him. 
: was stated that his action came after 
conference with, and the consent of. 

E. A. officials, the latter of whom, 
said, had told him to resume playing In 
le Challenge." Subsequently, he re- 
ied aa a member of the A. E. A. 
il of this was announced and thoroughly 
e into at strike headquarters, where 

announcement caused feeling to run 
li against their erstwhile member. Little 
ups gathered In all parts of the building 
1 discussed Bllnn's action; and, there- 
sr, whenever his name was mentioned at 
Ice headquarters. It was hissed. * 

he organization also called up the City 
wb Association and issued at statement 
r the telephone to the news association 
which they emphatically denied that 
in had gone over to the managers with 
lr consent; In fact, they stated, he had 
n told specifically that he should stick 
h the actors. Then it was that the 
owing notice was pasted on the wall at 
ice headquarters: 

Disloyal List. We want volunteers to 
Ice them see they are wrong. We want 
orts on those who- are rehearsing and 
ae who have taken the places of Equity 
mbers. Report to your captain." 
hese were the names on the "Disloyal 
t": Holbrook Bllnn, "The Challenge"; 
in Dinehart, "The Challenge"; Wilson 
rnolds, "The Challenge," Vlcl Boncelli,, 
le Challenge," Charles Sellon. "The 
lllenge"; Jessie Glendennlng, "The Chai- 
se." Zelda Sears. "A Voice in the 
•k"; Georgia Lee Hall, "A Voice In the 
■k"; Arthur Howard, "A- Voice in -the 
■k". Lowell Sherman, "A Voice in 

Dark"; Lionel Braham, "Chu Chin 
»w"; Albert Howson. "Chu Chin 
>w"; Adelaide Messmer, "Chu Chin 
>w"; Fred Kauffman. "Chu Chin Chow"; 
>rge Zorn. "Chu Chin Chow"; .Louis 

Viege, "Chu Chin Chow"; Olive Tell, 
vllian Clothes": Thais Lawton, "Crlm- 

Alibi"; Victor Dyer, "The Better 'Ole.V 




, la getting/ the - ainfj aWmb 
> calL. 3*1T of tils wceK ■_ 
by feaT o'clock and. Instead ' 
Ave tor <lx theatres, twelve were placed on' 
the so-called 'unfair list and their per- 
formers ordered to go oat. 

By that time theatre ., patrons had 
thronged the booses and were patiently 
awaiting the performances to start. After 
considerable wait, a number of house man* 
agers announced that, on account of the un- 
forseen strike, there would be no perform- 
ance and that the patrons could have their 
money refunded at the box office. A frantic 
rush was nude for the box-offices. Some of 
them were unprepared for this emergency 
and means had to be devised to keep the 
people stalled until money could be pro- 
cured from the banks. Some theatregoers, 
who were very much perturbed at this torn 



of their* resolu- . 



pledge. We haje* 



nrst-t 

alwsV reecfrlseu tat Association and 
wining to arattxateJ s spt have we any ab- 
jection to dealing with the association or. or- 
ganised labor. Bat, we do object to dealing 
with the association heads at the present 
time, for they are professional agitators. We 
have not broken or repudiated any contracts. 
I am Irish, and, speaking for myself, I am. 
going to light." 

"In this conflict there Is but one Im- 
portant Issue: Shall the actor have the 
right to collective protection? 

"When the manager and actor dealt with 
each other as individuals, a situation ex- 
isted which had no duplicate in any other 
held of activity. The actor, . while tree as 
an artist, was economically a slave. He 
often rehearsed the better part of a season 



of affairs, naturally became quite "peeved"- U ut worked and was paid salary tor only a 
a ° d JL?" 00 ^' "" _*. reautt of wWch_ "several r e w weeks. The contract which a majority 

of the managers forced the actor to sign was 
so trickily drawn that legally there was not 
even one square meal tor the actor la It 



H. SOTHERN STARTS NEW - 
SOCIETY FOR BROTHER ACTORS 

H. Sot Bern, on Monday, established 
dqnarters In the Blltmore - Hotel, where 
plans to organize a new association "to 
ntaln the dignity and standards of the 
atrlcal profession." Shortly, after con- 
'lng the plan of forming a new organlsa- 
i, Sothern sent telegrams to about -300 
resentatlve actors, asking them to Join 
h him. • 

larly In the evening he said he had re- 
'ed sixty acceptances from some of the 
t known actors and actresses In America, 
one those who Joined were David War- 
1. THinnie Maddern .Flake. Henry Miller, 
rard Kyle and others. No name, as yet, 
been selected fprcthe new organization. 



IIC AGO IS QUIET; NO 

TROUBLE EXPECTED THERE 

HiciGopIll.. Aufr.:u^-BcKardless of the 
>rta from Eastern sources that the actors' 
ae would take possession of Chicago on 
■day, local managers had a good nigh t 's 
p and awoke to find Chicago in its' same 
st mood. .~, :i. .o • ---<t'jv 

here had been reports that Grant Mitch- 



squabbles took place. In some Instances 
people had thrown away their seat coupons 

ana when they made their demands for a 
refund were Informed they would have to 
present them as an assurance that they had 
purchased tickets. At the Gaiety there were 
a number of arguments . among the natrons 
themselves which necessitated the interfer- 
ence of the police to quiet the belligerents. 

Persons who had purchased tickets from 
brokers and cut rate agencies also wanted 
to get their refund at the box-offices. It 
took several minutes to explain to each of 
these, that it would be necessary to get the 
refund at the agencies or cut-rate offices as 
In some Instances an excess was charged at 
the agencies for tickets and at the cut-rate 
offices the tickets had been procured at prices 
below the house scale. These people then 
went to the agencies and there found that 
the places bad already closed or had banked 
their receipts for the night and were not in 
a position to make restitutions at the time. 
These, however, were made on Friday. 

Those performers who walked ont, aug- 
mented by those who were unable to work 
then started promenading along Broadway 
and, by ten o'clock, were collected along the - 
Rlalto In small groups discussing the situ- 
ation. . A great many arguments ensued and 
several fistic encounters took place. Those 
who were responsive to the walk-out order 
were made heroes and heroines and those 
who had not answered the call were reviled 
and called "scabs." ' i 

During one of these so-called discussions', 
shortly after mid-night at Broadway and 
Forty-seventh Street, the police took a hand 
nnd eight performers were arrested and 
booked in the West Forty-seventh Street' 
station on a charge of disorderly conduct. 
They were Sol Ginsberg' (Vlollnsky), Rsy 
Walker, George Green, Daniel Wormer, Rob- 
ert O'Brien, William Devere, Nat Glazer and 
Roy Chlter. AU were charged by the police 
with being participants in a free-for-all fight 
that was going on when the police arrived 
on the scene at 2 ;30 that morning. 

In the West Side Court, on Friday morn- 
ing. Magistrate Frothlngh^m discharged all 
«-lth the exception of Roy Chlter and Bay 
Walker. These two had failed to put in an 
appearance when their names were called for 
trial, so the magistrate declared the ball of 
{500 each, which they had given In the po- 
nce station earlier that morning, forfeited. 
However, they- finally did show up- in court 
and the magistrate, after hearing their 
stories, lifted the forfeit on their respective 
bonds and discharged them, too. 

When the reports of the strike came intt 
the Equity office, the officers of that organ- 
ization stated they were gratified with rev 
salts. GUlmore said that the .A. E. A. was 
wen satisfied with the progress made. 
■ ITon must remember that the people whole- 



walked, out tonight are losing money and art 
would possibly can the Windy City into * doing this for a principle," be 



theatrical strike. 
here are' a half dozen • new plays here " 
er rehearsal, some of them scheduled to 
r the two dollar bouses, but nothing has 
> done to interfere with them. Among 
productions are "Freckles," "The 
nps," "My Sammy Girl," and "My Sun- 

le Led y . " 

tarry Sheldon, representing the man- 
rial interests, stated that be is doubtful 
my strike would be attempted here, 
[any of the actors are reported as being 
red without signing the Equity contract. 
situation here Is extremely quiet, and It 
ery doubtful if it wlU change. 

NFVSION ABOUT HOUSES 

MARKS START OF STRIKE 

pon returning to the A. E\ A. heed- 
rters from the meeting Thursday eve- 
c, Francis Wilson announced that lie and 
more desired to make a statement to 
press. With them wss Paul N". Turner, 
lsel for the A. E. A. 

hey stated that the attitude of the 
Lagers had forced the crisis and, as a 
ilC five or six theatres would be closed 
: evening, but declined to mention the 
les of the houses to be affected, as that 

aU placed in the s«ni<a of the com- 
;ee chosen to handle the situation, 
a the meantime they were awaiting 
iern'9 answer as to bis visit to the man- 
's. Finally word came that the people 
been Instructed as to what honses were 
be "pulled" and the deputy organizers 
lelegates departed on their mission. They 
s all accompanied by a number of pickets. 

a crowd of morbidly curious who had 
lered at the "strike" headquarters in 
tv-flfth Street to see what it was all 
it. 



— said, "so that ■ 
,)n the future they may have an organisation 
HO support them in their 'demands." 

About an -hour after the strike call had 
been answered, William James Fitz pa trick. 
vice president of the A. A. A. A., accom- 
panied by Jim Marco, one of his henchmen 
of "White Rat" days, made his appearance 
st the Equity offices. He stated that he 
wns surprised to bear a strike had taken 
place and waa making a call to ascertain 
what the results were. He declared that 
neither he nor Mountford had any knowledge 

as to what took place In advance as tbey 

were not interfering in the affairs of the 
E quit y. 

When word reached the managers In the 
afternoon that a strike was imminent and 
that G. H. Sothern was bringing sn ulti- 
matum of the A. E. A, to them, Sam Harris, 
William A. Brady, Arthur Hopkins, Arthur 
Hammerrteln. Joe Weber, John L. Golden, 
Edgar Selwyn and others gathered In the 
Cohsn snd Harris offices to await bis ar- 
rival. When be failed to show up. how- 
ever, and the "pulling" out commenced, they 
departed for their theatres to ascertain what 
had been done. Later on in the evening, 
Sam Harris, president of the P. M. A made 
this statement: 

"We're not worried or scared. Well take 
ore of ourselves. This Is a strike for Wil- 
son. Mountford and Fltxpatrick- It la en- 
tirely selfish. They don't take Into consid- 
eration the smaU people In the acting pro- 
fession, many of them with dependents, who 
have got to suffer. Cohan and Harris will 
look after them. Well do all we can and 
when Cohan and Harris ssy that, it means 
something." 

William A. Brady, who also spoke for the 
managers association, said : 

"Representatives of the Actors' Equity 
have had seversl conferences with the man- 
agers snd, after each one, they have broken 



"The women of the stage were inadequate- 
ly protected. The Actors' Equity Association 
was formed to remedy these intolerable con- 
ditions. 

"Although the managers reluctantly, 
after years of petitioning, made certain con- 
cessions tending towards better conditions. 
tbey never at any time treated the Actors' 
Equity Association with the courtesy which 
Its patience, its .fair dealing, its desire for 
Equity, deserved. And at no time did a 
majority of the managers live np to the 
contract which they had signed. 

"Nevertheless, the Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion avoided conflict and hoped by setting 
an example of right conduct to induce the 
manager to accept and live np to a similar' 
standard. This policy, however, proved in- 
effective, for when the Producing Managers' 
Association' was formed, it forthwith In- 
sisted- that the actor give up some of the 
rights which had been so grudgingly granted. 

"When this demand came, the Actors' 
Equity Association suggested that if the ex- 
isting contract was to be modified in one 
particular. It should be changed throughout 
so as to conform to present conditions. This 
the managers refused. 

"The Actors' Equity Association then se- 
cured the consent of the Hon. William H. 
Taft and the Hon. Charles E. Hughes to re- 
view the entire matter as arbitrators, and 
offered to abide by their decision and enter 
into an agreement which would settle all 
differences for a term of years. This the 
managers refused. Thereafter the Actors' 
Equity Association affiliated with the 
American Federation of Labor. 

"Within the last few days a committee 
of the Council of the Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion met a committee of the Producing Man- 
agers' Association, and at this meeting the 
lntter severely criticised and censored the 
Actors' Equity Association for affiliating 
with the American Federation of Labor, 
abased various of the officers of the Actors 
Equity Association and flatly refused to dis- 
cuss the differences between t be i manager 
and the actor, demanding of the latter that 
he discard the Actors' Equity Association, 
his sole means of representation, and de- 
fense. *- ' *' 

'■'And at the very time when, > by these 
meetings, the Producing Managers* Associa- 
tion wig leading trie Actors' Equity Asso- 
ciation to believe that It was endeavoring to 
secure a harmonious agreement, the Chair- 
man of the Managers' committee was ' actu- 
ally engaged In the formation of a' dual 
organisation, of various branches or the 
amusement world, for the avowed purpose of 
disrupting I the Actors' Equity Association 
end forcing the set or to deal with the man- 
ager as an indrrldnaL 

"And mere -than, that : although the- man- 
agers have given Actors' Equity contracts 
to 90. per cent, of the actors who are work 



reeks. Ralph Hers and VI 

_ 'chorus girls could not be persuaded 
to join the walkout because one of their 
number had been refused an Equity con- 
tract when aha asked for one some weeks 
ago. 

It has fallen upon Ray Koaser, a chorus 
girt, to put over the majority of the big 
sons; numbers of "Monte Crlsto, Jr.," since 
the. strike extended to the Winter Garden 
and she has been supported by a bevy of 
vaudeville acts hastily recruited from book- 
ins; offices. 

Busy pickets In front of the Winter Gar- 
den Inform the theatre-going public that 
"all the stars are out, and it's going to be 
a bum show tonight" and they finally per- 
suaded Williams and Wolfus who were the 
mainsprings of the show on Friday night 
to desert it one night later. An offer of 
a twenty-five week contract at a flattering 
salary waa tendered by the Shuberts to 
Williams and Wolfus, who unhesitatingly 
turned It down. 

Among- the stars who acted aa replace- 
ments for several nights at the Winter 
Garden were To to. Rooney and Bent, and 
Jan Dubinl and Diana. 

"I've turned away about three hundred 
patrons from the Winter Garden tonight," 
waa the proud statement of Richard Gordon, 
-a "Voice In the Dark" striker, who was 
promenading In front of the house on Satur- 
day evening with the following printed 
notice stuck in his straw hat. 

"In spite of all statements to the con- 
trary, the Actors' Equity Association only 
asks for the right of collective bargaining 
as upheld by President Wilson. We only 
ask that our grievances be arbitrated and 
agree to abide by the result." 

During his picketing, Gordon waa stopped 
by Lee Shubert who said to him: "Don't 
you know that by doing this you are lower- 
ing yosr^elf to the level of a bricklayer?" 
Gordon replied that if that were the case It 
was Shubert and other managers who were 
responsible for the degradation. 

Holding Gordon's arm and herself active 
In picket duty, walked Sue McManamy, 
who played an Important role In "The Five 
Million" before going on strike. She de- 
lighted in asking outgoing patrons what 
they bad thought of the new version of 
"Monte Crlsto." 

On Sunday night Gordon fell into the 
hands of the law when he waa arrested 
outside of the Winter Garden, charged with 
disorderly conduct. It was charged that 
he was telling people that the Winter 
-Garden ahow was a "bum burlesque." In- 
side the theatre, members of Shubert pro- 
ductions who did not strike were present- 
ing. M concert program. Gordon gave his 
home address as the Lamb's Club. 
. Another picket who fared unluckily waa 
Anthony Hughes, of 1696 Broadway, who 
was arrested by a private detective at the 
Winter Garden and charged with disorderly 
conduct by Stanley Sharp, house manager. 
Hughes was found guilty and fined twenty- 
five dollars by the night court. > 

When J. B. Dunn, an old White Rats* 
supporter, heard of the arrest he offered 
to stand the ball, according to a statement 
given out at strike headquarters, and later 
paid the fine. Dunn la now a racing msli 
and has a string of horses at the Empire 
City Track. 

Sidney Jarvls, who Uvea at the Hotel 
Hontarejr. and who la one of those who 
walked out of "Monte Crlsto. Jr.." was also 
arrested for disorderly conduct on Ba turday 
night, but the case was adjourned. 

On Saturday night,. Ralph Hers deserted 
the strikers and madeTrts reappearance with 
the Winter Garden production. ' alt was an- 
nounced by the Shuberts that he had with- 
drawn his -application for J membership lb 
the Equity. . . - f 

Interest in the actors* strike almost- i 



t-_ _i. F V_ • v _ V.j 7 J""?" interest In the actors* strike almost cost 

Ing or a re In rehearsal today, yet already - . John Fix at- 360 Wear One VniSiZS VJi 
they have served notice upon the' actor that SrSLSX' nLlV Jf¥„&£*$y"rLS& 



aeh deputy, organizer had his orders and --faith with -us by divulging the business die- 
1 arrival at the... theatre .bad little cussed at these meetings. Too 



can see that 



they have served notice upon the" actor that 
tbey do not longer propose to live up to 
these contracts. 

"It is an essential feature of each of these 
contracts that the Acton* Equity Associa- 
tion is the representative of the actor In his 
de-iUngs with the manager, and that Asso- 
ciation the manager now refuses to reeog- 
nlxe snd with it fie refuses to deal. There- 
fore the nctor works under these contracts 
at hit peril. 

"There can be no honest criticism of the 
conduct of the Actors' Equity Association. 
From the first. It hss fought for a clean 
theatre — In the box-office as weU as behind 
the curtain. It has worked unceasingly to 
keep tbe actor snd manager in harmony. It . 
has compelled Its members to live op to their 
obligations. Each step which might cause 
a breach between manager and actor hss 
been forced upon it by the manager. 

Twelve houses were closed in all and 
what developed at some of them then and 
afterward follows: 

Wintar Gardan 

Thursday night was a peaceful one for 
"Monte Crlsto. Jr.." and the ahow went 
on as usual, but, on Friday night, the 
Winter Garden waa put on the Strike Cir- 
cuit of the A E. A., which resulted In 
a veritable hegira of principals. Those 
who deserted the ranks were Chic Sale. 
the Watson Sisters, Adelaide and Hughes. 
Sidney Jarvls, Tom Lewis, Jack Caarwln. 
Gordon Dooley, Winiazn Dooley. Rater 
Walker. Katherine Wyley. Jack Squires, 
.and May Buck bridge. In fact, tbe only 
ones of the old cast that remained were 



Sixteenth Street, his automobile on Satur- 
day night when be saw .a picket disturb- 
ance In front of the Winter Garden and. 
leaving his machine at the curb, walked 
over to the scene of the trouble. He turned 
In time to see a man driving his automobile 
away. and. leaping on the running board he 
ordered the driver to stop. The' man ex- 
plained that he had been asked by a man 

to Inspect the machine and repair it so 
that it would run more smoothly. He was 
■"ft™ *?,.*-*• w «*' Forty-seventh Street 
police station and. gave his name as John 
f^Ulr-age tnlrty-nlne. of 810 West One 
Hundred and Eighteenth Street. 

When Jefferson Do Angelis, who has been 
stationed at the 'Winter Garden stag* door 
as a picket, spotted a taxlcab conveying 
two acrobats from the Winter Garden to 
the Century Roof, he hailed the driver and 



asked 

o/aXbsr* know youre ""Ty™* 

"Well/l won't be ca 



couple. 



declared the unlon~~cnauffeur? and the'two 

passengers. In their spangled tights were 

2?X? to .* et 2 ut "i Mbtfiue their journey 
to^the stage door afoot. ^ 

On Monday- night. Just before the per-. 
fornuuica. both sides of Broadway near The 
Winter Garden resembled a street in front 
of a newspaper office on election night 
on account of the dense crowd, which Sis 
alow in heeding the policemen', order,™ 
S° v ? °5r _ The crowd was made np of 
I5? u JL°» n,e, » Patrons, curious spectators 
S d ,S? 1 w? CT ? -^"Ky Pickets, all db^hlylng 

' (Continued on page 31) r .f?^ >. 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13, 1919 



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Mr. Howard Kyle, founder of ;|he Actors'! Equity Association, 
who for more than six years served as a member of its Counsel and 
in other capacities without remuneration, has resigned from' the 
Actors 9 Equity Association. In connection with his resignation Mr. 
Kyle sent the following letter to Mr. E. H. Sothern who has also 
since resigned from the Actors 9 Equity Association. 

^' • . '" ' - New York, August 5th, 1919. 

Dear Sothem: 

I am sorry I didn't get a word to you before you were induced to send a letter to the Actors' Equity Asso- 
ciation, approving the course its officers and counsel have wrong-headedly »a1c<*n- For once the managers are 
right in their stand. They have recognized the Actors' Eqftiity Association as an organization and. they invited 
its representatives to meet them and make a mutual agreement for the uniform adoption and use of an im- 
proved form of the United Managers' Protective Association-Actors' Equity Association contract to cover a pe- 
riod of three or five years. Each manager in the new producing Managers' Protective Association (and it in- 
cludes practically all of them) is under a bond by which he would forfeit $10,000 if he breached any agreement 
made by his organization. That is any agreement like that of the adoption of a uniform standard contract. 
This was the very situation, or should I say consummation, toward which the Actors' Equity Association has 
been aiming for six years. Some of the radicals misapprehend the spirit of co-operation that possessed the 
managers and attributed their action to motives of fear; thereupon an utterly foolish and unnecessary ulti- 
matum was issued concerning extra performances which were made to include legal holiday matinees and Son- 
day appearances. The arbitrary action was taken despite insistent warnings I made to the counsel of its ill- 
advisedness. The aggression came, yon see, from our side when the managers were in an. amenable state of 
mind and actually willing,' as they are now, to stand for a clause by which all salaries shall be reckoned by the ' 
performance. .;.'." _ 



' In order to save their own faces our representatives proposed publicly that the whole matter of a contract be 
given to an outside Board of Arbitration, thus trying to embarrass the managers. As I openly predicted, the 
managers said there was nothing to arbitrate and they have proceeded to use the standard contract United 
'Managers' Protective Association- Act ors' Equity Association, changing only the clause as to how any issue may 
be arbitrated; meanwhile poor men and women who are actually working under equitable conditions are 
forced to strike as the result of the bad leadership of our association. '• '•"- I . '■' •;•_>.•' . 

It is important to remember that the accepted Actors' Equity Association-United Managers' Protective As- 
sociation contract was actually drawn up in the first instance by the Actors* Equity Association itself, .and. the 
clauses consenting to play Sunday night performances and legal holiday matinees were put into this contract by 
the actors themselves. The changes now demanded, therefore, constitute additions to our own contract, which'' 
we have proclaimed as equitable all over the world. No one has ever pretended that the contract, which is a 
minimum one, is the best that might be secured, and it is. only fair to recall that Mr. Marc Klaw, President of 
the- United Managers' Protective Association, spoke at the ratification supper in November, 1917, saying: "This 
is a history-making occasion, but the contract as it stands is only a beginning." 



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(Signed) '"-.'.' ; Tours very truly, T^ 

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August 13, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



STAGE-HANDS WONT STRIKE WITH ACTORS, WITHOUT GIVING NOTICE 



(Continued from page 29) 



• "Don't patronise this house!" they 
shouted to prospective Winter : Garden 
customers. . ' " : 

"You won't see 'Monte Cristo* - Inside . 
Nothing but. a bunch of understudies and 
ch63 d vflrl^ ty a c ts. " 

'Women strikers addressed audiences from 
the curb until they were told to more on 
and played the roles of orators so well that 
they managed to provoke considerable 
cheering from the crowd. •-' -' 

On Monday night, the Winter Garden put 
on a Joint "Shubert Gaiety" "Monte 
Criato" show. That is. the Forty-Fourth 
Street Theatre closed Its doors and those 
who had been playing the rejuvenated 
"Qaleties" there were Drought up 'to the 
Winter Garden to combine with the loyal 
ones who had been keeping the Winter 
Garden open. 

.The present show Includes a number of 
vaudeville acts, Katherlne Wyley and Ralph 
Hers, of the old Monte Cristo cant, a num- 
ber of minor principals from this same cast 
and the following members of Shubert's 
"Gaieties": Marguerite Farrell, Ina Wil- 
liams, Llora Hoffman, Freda Leonard, Ma- 
Belle, Adoree and Sladden. 

The latter three have played a trio of 
theatres in one week, starting at the 

Shubert In "Oh, What a Girl." leaving there 
at the time of the strike and going into 
the Forty-Fourth to later be sent up Broad- 
way to the Winter Garden. ! . 
The house is playing to good' business. 

Selwyn 

Eugene Walter's "The Challenge," which 
deals with labor problems and strikes, found 
that It was confronted with a strike problem 
of Its. own when Holbrook Blinn and his 
company quit on Thursday night,; pursuant 
to the Equity strike order. • I 

The house was dark on Thursday evening,' 
but xbe next night the play opened agau. 
«1th only Louise Mclntyre and Leonard 
Doj.e missing from the original cast. When 
Eugene Walter appeared before the curtuin 
to announce that Janet Beecber would take 
Miss Mclntyre's part, there was applause 
mingled with hisses. Harry Malnhall stepped 
into Doyle's role, reading the part from 
nanuscrlpt 

The reason for the reopening of "The ' 
Challenge" on Friday night was laid to 

Holbrook Bllnn's financial connection with 

the play, although it has not been ascer- 
tained just bow much this financial connec- 
tion amounts to. It Is claimed by the man- 
agement that, on account of Blinn being an 
actor-manager, he is not violating in any 
tray either the intent or specific purpose of 
the association's rules In appearing, despite 
ibe strike order. Blinn himself explained 
this, to the audience on Friday night in a 
statement which was as follows : 

"When the Selwyns first discussed present- 
ing 'The Challenge' I waB asked by them to 
jlay a part In it. After reading the play, I 
ran bo strongly impressed by it that I im- 
nedlately sought to obtain an Interest In 
he play. After considerable discussion with 
rath the Selwyns and Eugene Walters, the 
tuthor. It was finally arranged that I should 
le admitted to a partnership agreement with 
ibem, so far as this one play, was concerned. 

"Since that time, I have acted always as 
>ne of the proprietors of the enterprise and 
im so considered by the Actors' Equity Asso- 
zlatlon. I have an iron-clad contract which . 
' sot only calls for me appearing In person in 
the play, bnt It also provides that I act in a 
managerial capacity in connection with it. 

•"I did not appear In the play on Thurs- 
day night because I desired to submit the 
matter to members of the association. It is 

because I have been .advised that I am 
morally and legally bound to stand by my 
contractual obligation .with' Selwyn and 
Company and with Eugene Walter that I 
consented to resume playing. 

.''For many "years it has been known by 
every one connected .with the theatrical pro- 
fession that my sympathies were entirely 
with the actors. I have helped to the best 
of my ability to fight their fight and I hope 
they win; •,--.-.- 

"I want to. have It thoroughly understood 
that 'I am playing in .'The Challenge' . because 
of the fact that I am legally bound to do 80. 
My position at the present time Is not that 
Of the actor, but of the manager. 

"Had I only myself to consider, not even 
my managerial Interest In 'The Challenge" 
could persuade me to "remain at the bead of 
the cast as long as this trouble remains un- 
settled. But" I cannot think of myself; my 
convictions, nor my personal inclinations. I 
must consider the Selwyns and Mr. Walter, 
to whom I am bound bv contract." 

Picketing in front of the Selwyn on Fri- 
day night proved as interesting to' the the- 
atregoers as the- show' within. Ed. Wynn. 
who insisted that he was not picketing but 
merely trying to "lighten the sltuatlon,' r was • 
giving a bit of a free show on the curb, 
telling stories, and entertaining the crowd 
with a funny little walk. 

Another picket was Informing the theatre- 
goers that the Selwyn was playing "ten- 
twenty-tbtrty stuff." and declared that 
"nobody hut understudies are playing to- 
night." ~ . i. 

Willard Mack, Edgar Selwyn and Eugene . 
Walter were all on hand on Friday night 
ready to step into the show and take parts, 
but their services were not needed. 

Saturday, the Selwyn press agent got in 
his licks when an aviator flew over Manhat- 
tan and bombarded Broadway with handled! 
of circulars which read: - . 

"Performances will positively be given this 
afternoon and tonight by Holbrook Blinn In 
'The Challenge' at the Selwyn Theatre, West 
42d street." ; ■. 



The aviator who pulled this stunt for the 
Selwyns was Rlcbard Depew, who left Booee- 
velt Field, at Mineola, L. I., in time to reach 
■ Times -Square about 1 o'clock. 

"The Challenge" has been playing to 
fairly good houses and is a mecca for swarms 
of toe curious every evening around opening 
time, the crowds loitering around the front 
and the lobby as if they were expecting 
something exciting to happen. 

Forty-Fourth Street Theatre 

When the curtain went up on the Shubert 
"Gaieties of 1919" on Thursday night, the 
audience was told that most of the princi- 
pals had deserted, but that the chor us 
would attempt to carry the show forward 
with the portion of the principals that re- 
mained. With this announcement, a con- 
siderable part of the audience made its way 
for the box office and had its admission 
money refunded. . , 

Ing included Ed Wynn. George Haskell. 
William Kent. Stewart Balrd, Harry 
Fender. Ted Lorraine, Kuy Kendall, Gus 
Mlnton, Jlmmle Fox, Marjorte Gateson, 
Gladys "Walton. Claude Archer. Jack Bonn. 

On Friday, Clayton and White, and Julie 
Ballew. Joined the walkers-out 

The members of the original company 
who did not strike are The Glorias. Llora. 
Hoffman, Marguerite Farrell, Ina Williams. 
Freda Leonard, Kathryn Hart, Gllda Gray 
and Olea Hepatone. Three chorus girls 
were persuaded by Marjorle Gateson to 
loin the strikers on Thursday night. 

On Friday night, Sophie Tucker, Adoree 
and Sladden, O Hanlon and Zambounl and 
Phil Baker Joined the Gaieties cast of 
principals. There were rumors afloat that 
Al Jolson had been asked to become a 
"strike-breaker" but had refused. This 
was denied at the Shubert office. Lon 
Haskell refused an invitation to Join the 
cast. "Walter Morrison was recruited .for 
Saturday night 

J. J. Shubert. when the strike was called, 
hurried back from Stamford, Connecticut, 
declaring that there- would be a smooth, 
first-class performance of the show again 
on Friday night, when the Forty-Fourth 
opened with Its new principals. Except 
for a slight disorder In the gallery the per- 
formance ran smoothly enough, playing tp a 
half-full house. Many patrons demanded 
their money back however when they found 
that Ed Wynn was not working. To 
avoid a repetition of this occurrence, sign- 
painters . were busy on Saturday morning 
eradicating the words: "With Ed "Wynn" 
from wherever they appeared on the Shu- 
bert advertisements. 

However, Saturday's audiences at the 
Forty-Fourth Street went far from packing 
the house, so on Sunday the Shuberts made 
the announcement that they had decided to 
combine the "Monte Cristo, Jr." and 
"GaietieB" casts, and that, in the present 
emergency, what remained of the two Shu- 
bert attractions would be seen at the Winter 
Garden, beginning Monday night. 

The Forty-Fourth Street Theatre is now 
dark. 



> ';". C o han a nd Harris 
The producers of "The Royal "Vagabond" 
were, taken completely off their feet when 
their theatre was put on the Strike Cir- 
cuit On Thursday night and anyone with 
less ingenuity than that of George M. 
Cohan would have probably faUed to put 
the show back on the boards the very next 
night after the strike was called. Cohan 

succeeded, however, and the show is now 

running with" chorus girls of last Week now- 
playing leading roles and with George M. 
himself in the leading comedy role. 

The walk-out on the first night of the 
strike practically Included the entire cast 
of principals.- The strikers were Tessa. 
Kosta, John-* Gbldaworthy. Frederlo'Santley. 
Grace' Fisher, Frances Demorest, Winifred 
Harris, Julian Winters Roger Gray, Lou's 
Simon, Carl Hyson and Dorothy Dixon, 
his wife, who was, at the time of the call- 
ing of the strike on; her vacation. 

The strikers have been replaced, re- 
spectively, by Virginia O'Brien. Alex Lef- 
kowUz. Ainslee Lambert, Eleanore Bennett, 
Erne Shelley. Rosamond Rankin, Eugene 
Elliott George M. Cohan, Sam Forrest 

(general stage director), Lou. Lockett, and 
Mary -Eaton,"Who was previously playing a 
smaller role In the same piece. ' Those on 
strike also include Jack Connors. Charles 
Callahan, John Ross and Edward Ryan, 
specialty quartette. 

Miss O'Brien, who climbed from the 
chorus to the leading role over night seems 
to be a real "find" and is receiving warm 
applause in the role of Anltza. 

There is a mortgage Introduced into the 
action of the play and it has come In for 
considerable prominence since Cohan has 
essayed the role of Marcel, the barber, for 
now,- whenever Cohan must refer to the 
script he takes the audience Into his confi- 
dence by saying. "I must refer to the mort- 
gage." and then goes on to read his part. 
This clowning of the role seems to tickle 
the Broadwayites. 

On -the re-opening of "The Royal Vaga- 
bond" on Friday night it appeared as if' 
the Cohan and Harris had been chosen as 
managerial headquarters. Archie Selwyn, 
Edgar Selwyn, Sara Harris, 'William A. 
Brady. Frank Underwood and Arthur Hop- 
kins all being in the audience. 

Between the acts, Brady took advantage 
of the occasion to make a speech, declaring 
that "the Equity was being guided by an 



unprincipled agitator who properly belongs 
not at liberty." He declared that one of the 
officers of the Four A's had threatened. In 
a Chicago interview, to place bombs in 
theatres to keep patrons away. 

This statement has been refuted by James 
W. FlUpatrlck who says that bis state- 
ments have been misconstrued and that 
what he said was that "people bought 
tickets at their peril," meaning, thereby, 
that they were likely to buy tickets and 
later be disappointed at not seeing a per- 
formance. Brady further assailed the Four 
A's In his speech by saying: "I think It 
is deplorable, now that the world is on 
the crater of a volcano, that a foreign agi- 
tator should be allowed to play on the emo- 
tions of the actors — for they are extremely 
emotional — and thus deprive chorus girls 
of a method of earning their living." 

A curtain speech was also made by 
Cohan, who stated that he thought the 
managers were right and that. If he thought 
differently, he would not be "with them." 

"There Is no Justice on the- side of the 
actor." he said, "and I would b.e with the 
actors If they were In the right. They are 
not fighting for the actors but fighting 
for themselves. They are getting gzOO and 
1300 a week and up to 11.000. and they are 
asking for more." 

During the performance on Friday night, 
Cohan interpolated the following line Into 
a scene with Sam Forrest: 

"I'll kick you In the face and have you 
look like the ham who used to play that 
part." 

The dark house on Thursday night cost 
the management about '(■1,350. 

A scuffle between Sam H. Harris and 
Harry Lambert, a striking actor who came 
to the stage door to see his wife, Winifred 
Harris, and was refused admittance, livened 
up things around the Cohan and Harris for 
a few minutes early Thursday evening. . 

All the stage hands, electricians, musi- 
cians and actors who had remained loyal 
to the Cohan interests Were tendered a 
dinner by Cohan on Friday and. In a speech, 
be said to his guests: "All of you can work 
tor Cohan and Harris as long as we are in 
the business." 

Gaiety 

The whole "Ugbtnln' " cast went out on 
Thursday night, and Wlnchell Smith and John 
L. Golden, the producers, found themselves 
with a full bouse, but without even the 
semblance of a cast. When it was an- 
nounced that ticket money would be refunded 
at the boxoffice a congestion took place that 
was -almost a riot -i •' 

Frank Bacon, who plays the lead in 
"Ugbtnln'," was .the main Instigator of the 
walkout, and, on account of his peculiar and 
unique position, he may well be called tbe 
Equity's martyr for the stand that be has 
taken. Bacon was drawing money from tbe 
show through three channels : as actor, .as 
co-author and as co-owner. Neither Is he a- 
young man, be having already spent a con 
stderable portion of bis career in stock snd 
not until the production of "Llgbtnln' " did - 
be really "land" on Broadway with both feet. 
He might easily have taken the stand that 
Holbrook Blinn took In "The Challenge." 
and have remained with the show on the 
ground that he had a financial interest in it 

But Bacon declared that bis sympathies 
were all wth the actor and walked ,out of . 
the Gaiety asking his cast to follow him, 
which they did to the last man. 

The cast Included Jason Rohards, Paul 
Stanton, Thomas McLarnle, Fred Conklin, 
E. J. Blunkall, Sam Cost, George Spelvin, 
Sidney Coburn, William F. Granger, George 
Thompson. Lawrence 0'Keefe, James C. 
Lane, Beatrice Nichols, Marie -Reels, Jane 
Oaker, Bessie Bacon, . Beth Martin, Alice 
Qulgley. Georgie Drew Mendum, Minnie 
Palmer, .May Duryea. Frances Kennan, Both 
Harris and Florence Goddard. 

The strikers at this theatre were In quite 
n gleeful mood and, on Saturday night- a 
big sight-seeing bus was engaged and was 
seen all around the White Light district 
with a banner flying from Its side Informing 
Broadway that "Lightnln' Has Struck." 
Ti-oae In the anto blew horns and. cheered, 
and occasionally received return cheers from 
friends on the street 

If there are any persons on Broadway who 
do not know of tbe actors' strike, a notice 
that was posted in the lobby of the Gaiety 
Monday might leave them rather puulea. It 

reads: >" .--.-.• : .-- I ». 

"Tbe .'Llehtnln'.' company, having played 
here for 427. consecutive performances, feel 
that they require a short vacation. Per- . 
fonnances will be resumed at an early date." 

The names of Winchell Smith and John 
L, Golden are signed to the notice. "Crowds 
stopped. to read it on Monday night and one 
man with some printed A. E. A. propaganda 
in his bat was heard to remark: 

"Even we strikers have got to laugh at 
that sign; It wins th» brown derby." 

If Frank Bacon was' on -his vacation, as 
tbe notice seemed to Intimate, he was spend- 
ing his vacation on Monday evening around 
the Gaiety box office, busily chatting with 
the box office men- and other strikers who 
bad chosen the front of tbe Gaiety as a vaca- 
tion center. 

The house is In darkness and no intimation 
has been given as to when it is expected to 
open again. 

Glob* 

Although indications seemed to point to 
"She's a Good Fellow" going on the strike 
circuit with the opening of the Fonr As* hos- 
tilities, it was not until Saturday marines 
that the Dillingham house was dark. At 



that time, the entire cast headed 

Bantley. walled out, declaring l 

- strikers, with the one exception of Florence 
.- JCarL who thought the managers shepld have 

' been given two weeks' notice before " 
strike. 

Those who are Equity members are : Joseph 
San tier, James C Marlowe, Maurice D'Arey, 
Robert J. m nr"". 8cott welsh. Jay "Wilson. 
Ivy Sawyer. Ann Orr. Florence Brace, Hand 
Nolan, Bosetta Duncan, Vivian Duncan, Ina 
Brooks, Nellie Fillmore. Pauline Halt Arllne. 
Chase. 

It was after Dillingham Issued the fol- 
lowing statement on Saturday morning that 
the actors at tbe Globe Joined the striking 
ranks: 

"Although I have Just arrived In town 
after a month's absence, the Aetor's Equity, 
Association, by its threat to close my theatre 
and force actors to break their contracts 
with me against my will, compels me to take 
a stand and Join with my fellow managers 
lu protesting against any such arbitrary and 
Illegal methods"' 

Until this statement was Issued, it was 
doubtful in the actors' mind sb to what stand 
Dillingham was going to take. When the 
Producing Manager's Association was formed 
Dillingham did not immediately become a 
member and he Issued only Dillingham con- 
tracts. It was not until last week that be 
Joined tbe Protective Managers' Association. 

There Is no Intention to reopen "She's a 
Good Fellow" while the strike has theatrical 
Broadway In chaos. 

. New Amsterdam 

To strike or not to strike seemed to be the 
question at the New Amsterdam at almost 
every "Follies" performance, and the stage 
entrance drew as large a crowd as the front 
of the house. In fact on the first evening 
of the strike, it took five policemen to keen 
the crowd moving on Forty-first street and 
to prevent loiterers around the stage door. 

The rear of tbe New Amsterdam was rife 
with pickets talking to "members of tbe 
"Follies" cast and trying to persuade them 
to walk out Most active among this corps 
of pickets were Jobn Charles Thomas and 
Cyril Chsdwick. They Anally persuaded 
Eddie Cantor, Eddie Dowllng and Phil Dwyer 
into deserting the show on Thursday night 
but Cantor only deserted for one act re- 
turning in time to go into aot two. Dow- 
llng and Dwyer were again with the show 
for Friday night's performance. 

Johnny and Bay Dooley also walked out 
on Thursday night but were met at the door 
by Flo Zlegfeld. wbo persuaded them that 

- he was not a member of tbe manager's asso- 

- elation, whereupon they returned back stage 
to make up. 

On Friday night according to reports. 
' Cantor, five other principals and twenty-two 
chorus girls, were ready to strike, snd ss 
late as 8 o'clock those in the show did not 
know whether or not the curtain was goh 
to rise. But the Equity gave Zlegfeld uu 
Monday noon to declare himself, and a "pull- 
cot" of the "Follies" was temporarily de- 
ferred. 

Zlegfeld did not make any statement on 
Monday, but . the show went on as usual.' 
-Cantor, when questioned, did not make any 
"* explanations, but Just declared: 

'There'll be a show ; we're going on." 

i,< .--;; 

Knirli o r U o ck i 

The tunes of John Cort's "Listen Lester" 
were stopped on Thursday night, simultane- 
ous with tbe Equity's order to. strike, which - 

affected the Knickerbocker to the extent of - 
putting the house in darkness. The prin- 
cipals wbo walked out were Virginia Burt, 

Angelo Borneo, Eddie Garvie, Fred Helder. 

S Clifton Webb, Ads 1 Lewis. Hansford WDson 
and Gertrude Vanderbllt 

It was S o'clock before tbe Knickerbocker 
beard officially of the strike order," where- 
upon Manager Harry G. Sommers made the. 
. announcement to the audience that there 
would be ' no show, and told them that the 
box office would refund them their money. 
Borne took advantage of tbe refund, while 
others established credit st the box office for 
better days. 

The Chamberlain Brown office was called to 
tbe rescue to muster together a new cast 
with a view of opening on Monday evening, 
and rehearsals were begun at once. 

"Listen Lester" reopened as promised with 
the following cast of principal*: Josephlns 
Forayth. Irma Warwick. Ralph Josephs. 
Florence McKenna. George Edward, Esther 
Ingham, Gna Shy. Harry Paull, Ada Mae 
Weeks, Emma O'Nell, Frank Lambert, Mar- 
guerite Francesco and the Four Entertain- 
ers. 

The attendance at the reopening was slim. 
bnt this was probably because few really ex- 
pected "Listen Lester" to reopen wben it did. 
Sommers made a short curtain speech In 
which be announced that the new east was 
not composed of understudies or second rate 
performers but of "real actors," snd that 
the management had no apologies to offer, 
because there would be need of none. Som- 
mers claimed that the chorus was practically 
the same as in the first production. 

There were no disturbances and the per- 
formance went along smoothly, although the 
actors seemed a trifle nervous. 

Outside of the theatre a squad of auto- 
mobiles deposited s crowd of Equiety Pickets. 
who cried out against the show until about 
9 o'clock, when the autos returned and took 
the pickets back to strike headquarters. Tbe 
management did not s eem to relish tbe 
presence of the pickets and told the police 
so, but the latter said that the strikers bad 
a legal right to picket as long as they did 
not Indulge Is disorderly conduct. 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13, 1919 



*&JJA> : 0..-±. 



'^Launched on the Waves of Success" 
CH«prr OPENS MONDAY, SEPT. 8 

BURLESQUE ATTRACTIONS OF MERIT BY STANDARD PRODUCERS 

CHAS. E. BARTON, General Manager 



■ - "■■■'. '.*■-.. - \ , ilVta 

■ r;'.V -ft;. "» ' * 



New York 

Gaiety Theatre Bldg., 

1547 Broadway, 

Louis '?!^^ q j ", ".-".'■': 

Repi cieutatire 



OFFICES: 

Philadelphia 
1500 Chestnut St., 

A.H.LADNER,' 
Representative 



• " : -' • ' ;v. - " . 
i-ii ; - S ■ . 



''Chicago. 

fM'd ■'"& ."' Trihune Building, ' • 
c/o National Printing Co., 

4*:.- E. COLLINS.' ' 
' Representative : 



CALL 



NOTICE 

All people engaged for 



CALL 



TOM COYNE'S FRENCH BABIES CO. 

kindly report for rehearsal Monday, Aug. 18th, at 10:30 A. M., Tesch- 
macher's Casino, 618 9th Ave., corner 44th St. 

MATT KENNEDY MONA FAY 

Fn HinsnN DAINTY MAY BELLE 

ED. HULSON EVA LEWIS 

GEO. BENTLEY FLORENCE BURNS 

JACK RICH LOUISE ROSE 

Chorus Girls wanted. Best salaries paid, everything furnished. Railroad 
fores paid both ways. Acknowledge call, Room SOI, Columbia Theatre Bide. 



SIMON xVf. DRIESEN PRESENTS 

RICHY W. CRAIG 

and Am Many BsSlsisjpaw. Abo the Queen of the Folliea fcsgsf g Musical Extrava- 
«»nx». Wanted. Chorus Girls and people in all Knee. Address RICHY W. CRAIG, 
802 Columbia Theatre Bldg., New York. 



UNION SQUARE THEATRE 



Wants 
Best 



f BURLESQUE TALENT 



FOR ALL 
SEASON 



MONEY NO OBJECT FOR RIGHT PEOPLE 

"The Best Is None Too Good" 

We get tiie money and are willing to spend it. Permanent New 
York City engagement. Road salaries for good Chorus Girls. Six 
days a week — no Sunday shows. *.'-""•'■.' 



A IN/I BACHEN 

DOING IRISH MANAGEMENT-IKE WEBER With Chas. Rebuuoa'a Parisian Flirt. 

BABE WELLINGTON 



IRRESISTIBLE BUNCH OF NERVES KAHN3 UNION SQUARE THEATRE 



- ■ ' ' . j . — -* 



THIS SPACE 
RESERVED BY 



LEW LEDERER. 
KAHN'S UNION SQUARE 



BEAUTY 



RUTH ROLLING 



KAHffS 

UNION 

SQUARE 



SOUBRETTE 





Harry 



Don," 



Toss Howard 



SHIRLEY MALLETTE 



STRAIGHT 



WITH MAIDS OF AMERICA 



eJAISTE MAY 

SOUBRETTE MAIDS OF AMERICA 



PRIMA 
DONNA 



LUCILLE ROGERS 



BON 
TONS 



ElVIILY CLARK 



.WlthJo. 



Interna Soabrette-SUDING BILLY WATSON SHOW— Baaaa* lfW-lta 
MANAGEMENT ROBHM aai RICHARDS 



WTTH PACEMAKERS 



MAN AGEM ENT-HERK. KELLY * DAMSEL 



ERNEST MACK VERA HENNICI 

Eccentric Singtng: sad Dandnr. afaglag and Dancing 

Comedian Soubrette 

KAHN'S UNION SQUARE SOON. 

See ROEHM A RICHARDS ' . . 

MARGUERITE WELCH 

HUMA DONNA WITH THE VOICE - 

Sea WUI Roehek ReeluB «ml Ridiard*. Strand Theatre Bid*. New York 



JEW AND DUTCH 



t OPEN FOR BURLESQUE NEXT SEASON 



August 13, 1919 



i ,Si 



TJtE; NEW;YQRKv^LIFPiEK 



33 



HALL RENTALS SOAR 

. :' Continued from* ibzt'Z^i''. ' - 

where Courts and Tennis and several other 
produce re likewise have shows in rehearsal. 

Ararat Ham merstein, with . two musical 
Shown, is the most important tenant in 
B ry an t Hall ' at present.. His "Some Time" 
A>d "Somebody's Sweetheart" 1 - RhowTS" We 
spread over four rooms in thk' »tjilding : 
"Revelations of a Wife," George M. GettV 
show, and four different vaudeville acts 
comprise the. tenantry that is. taxing this 
■nail to capacity. 

'.,. Edward J. Fitzpa trick, manager of Am- 
sterdam Hall on West Forty-fourth street 
said that his hail was. one of the few 
throughout the city that has failed to raise 
the rent. The shows rehearsing, at .this 
hall are " Watch ' Tour Step,'* Plohn and 
Levy's road show ; two companies of Cohan 
and Harris's, "Going Up" ; O. B. Mad- 
dock's "Nothing: But Xoye" - T "Sliding," 
Billy Watson's show, and six hew vaude- 
ville acts belonging to Marty Brooks. ,,-..•■ 

At Vienna Hall, on East Fifty-eighth 
street, the recently organised producing firm 
of Dopree and Camp are rehearsing their 
first production called "Half a Widow," 
and Comatock and Gest have managed to 
find rehearsal quarters there for. their "Oh, 
Lady, Lady," and "Oh, My Dear" shows. 
At this particular hall, -the .management 
stated '-that, with the expiration - of the 
tenancy of the present theatrical companies 
there would be no others allowed to rent 
the rooms' for; rehearsal purposes, the prin- 
cipal objection being to "those chorus 
girls." . -p 

; May Irwin, on the other hand, was ap- 
parently unwilling' to take; chances in find- 
ing a rehearsal hall here, for she took the 
entire company, chorus as well as prin- 
cipals, of her "Water's Pine" show along 
with her to her Summer home in Clayton, 

N. Y., where the players are her guests at 
present, and are rehearsing, y; 



SEVEN DIE IN PARK FIRE 
Montbeai., Canada, Aug; 11.— A , fatal 
accident occurred here hut night, where a 
fire, caused' by a lighted cigarette, de- 
stroyed the Scenic Railway and many 
concessions at Dominion Park,. in this city. 

DOWNING OPENS IN BRIDGEPORT 
"i BUMlSpn, OaaiU, Jp-ug. -M«Bobj»*i 
Downing and hMr repertoire comtSay to a 
rerrwtfDf "TenTHghts in a BaT Boom M 
opens here tonight for a week's run. He 
will also open the Park's season tonight. - 

SPOFFORD SIGNS HAZEL BAKER 

E. B. Spofford, manager of the Ralph 
Clonniger Players, at Salt Lake. City, 
Utah, has engaged Hazel Baker as leading 
woman for the company. Milton' Good- 
hand has been signed to play juveniles. ; 

JOINS LUTTRINGER CO. 

LewisxoN, Me., Aug. 11. — Billy' Hall, 
who closed his own stock company in May, 
is now with Al Luttringer's stock company. 
Her has been featured by Luttringer in 
three bills with the company, which is en- 
joying a successful run. here. 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

(Continued from page> IS) 



c! .'<;-'• '; OMSK, JITAk. 

Sche'pp. Comedy Circus— Arthur Lloyd— Samaroff 
Trio — Josephine Darts — Cook & Loren* — Teeter 
Septette. . ■ ■ • . 

■£: i. •.-..> SEatVER, OOLO. 
. Helen Jackie j-— Fay 4 Jack Smith — Kajlyama — 
Hager * Goodwin — Rhoda 4 Crampton— Anderson's 
Berne. '._.,'.••. ) _.<. . ■ ;, Jt . 

. LOEWS CIRCUIT 

HEW TORE CITY. 
American (First Half )— Lelands— Beattle A 
Bloom— Weber. Beck ft Fraser — Almost ft Dumont 

— McMiLon Si.ter. -Ijaioen A I>u Pree«p— 
Argonne Five — Jolly Johnnie Jones, (last Halt) — 
Cooper ft I-aeey— MJnettl ft Sidelll — Clarence Wil- 
bur— "laihioES -De Vogoe"— -Jessie Bee*— Mr, 
FarreU .ft 'OeWHAarixroy ft sogers.-'- •* 

Boulermr4...fKlrit_ Half)— Cooper ft Leer— Ford 
ft Goodrich— Ben* Brooks ft Co. — Mumford * 
Stanley— sl£rTi<BrejL (Last Half)— Binns ft Bert 
— Eoley ft La Xsra-rMsrtln ft Courtney — Armstrong 
ft James — Four Runes. ' 

National (First. Half) — Chong— Vsn Bergen' ft 
Josesblne — Glllen, Carlessn ft Co. — Ted Beslyi- 
Janet Martini ft Co. (Cast Half)— Jack Redd 
Arthur Sullivan ft Co.— Mumford ft StanlajS-M 
cal (Hodges. ' • \ .*■-'■' 

Orphenm (First Half) — Dancing McDonalUfl=- 

Bos» Garden— NewportA Stlrk— Corse Payto 

Co.— Oownlng . ft BunlB-iBernlslcl Bros.i (' 

Half) -Joijy Johnny J_one»— Torelli— ^l»n ^Bergen 
4 "TDjeptifile — La Hone ft Dnprece — Wr«r< Fields 
— SBrolan, - Deno ft Bosnian. *»" -••— 

Axs. B (First Halt) —Four Clifford*— Bison City 
FeoswAlTaraS Duo. (Last Ha in — Connolly ft 
Francis — "After the ■ Honeymoon" — Stanley ft 
Mule Hughe*. .' . .' V. - 

Delanoey St.- (First Half}— Helen Morettt— 
B canl a n . Peno ft Scanlsn — Fabor . ft McGowan — 
Armstrong ft James— Mlnelll & Slfleiu. (last 
Half)— Olsdya Kelton— Al filcardo— Hafold Selman 
ft Co.— Newport ft Stlrk— Aerial Belmonts. 

-trresley Bq. (First Half)— AerUl Belmonts — 
McDermott ft Wallace— Al Blcardo— Arthur Sulll- 
tsu A Co. — Anthony ft Bocers— Fonr Babes. (Lest 
Half— Wilbur ft Girlie— Millard ft Doyle— Helen 
Morettl— Mr. ft Mrs.' mil ft Co. — Kins; ft. Barrey 
—Dancing McDonald.. . * 

TJjwcln Sfl. (First Half)— Gladys Kelton— Mil- 
lard 4; Doyle — Wjb-* Fields — Harold Behnan ft 
Co.— Lsngdon A- Smith. (Last Half)— Three Max- 
im s "Rose Garden" — GUIen Csrleton ft Co.— 
Fraser. Bonce ft Hardy — BernlTld Bros. 
- Victoria (First Half)— Three Maxima— TureW— 
Martin ft Courtney— King -ft Harvey — "Fashions 
De Vogoe." ' (Lsst Half) — Karsey's afyriapbooe — 
MeDermott ft Wallace — Harry Brooks A Co.— 
Weber. Beck ft Fraser — Seattle ft Bloom. 

-V BXOOXLTsT, V. T. 

ItstrspeUtsB (First Half )— Wilbur A Lyke-Jack 
Beddy — Sid. Fansll A Co. — Grsce rariiiiuli Tssii. 
Lelghton's Bevue: -.(last.. Halt)— Lelsnds— Ted 

Heslj— Almont A ' DnOMmt — Downing A Bantn— 
Argoone Flffe.- 

BsXsIb (First Half) — Joggling Nelson— Hyman 
A Co.— Fraser. Buuce A Hardy— Ksrsey'a 



Kyrtepheaa. (Last Half)— Bolgsr 
Slaters— Corse Psytoo ft ( Co.— Orsoo 
' "Janet of France." ' 

Fslsoa (Flrat Half!— Nelson: 4 Cronln.-: .last 
Half )— Four CUftords— Btsod . City. Four— Alrsrss 

Dno- ' - -~ '. I „. . : ■ 

> Warwick (First Half)— Morton Bros.— Mack ft 
Tel mar— "After . the -Honeymoon"— Beniy Fray— 
Balnnow - Glrla. (Lsat ^alf)— N*(aon . A, Cronln. 

Honey Hurst — Anderson 4 Bean— Van A Vernon. 

'~ (Flit Ballli , 
CUrl T 4 FranWs^Adrian- (Ls«t Half (—Louise 
A Csrmsn— Frsneis A De afar— McCarthy A 

atemad— Sen. Frauds Murpbj— BeU A Gray. ' 
FALL BITXX, stABS. - 
(First Half)— Loolse A Carman— Franda A Ds 
Mar— McCarthy ft aterosd— Sen. Frsneis Murphy- 
Bell ft Gray. (Last Half)— Ferdinand— Piunkett 
ft Sates— Clark ft Francis— Adrian. 

XAJULTOjT. OABAJIA, 
' Lowe ft Baker Slaters— Milan Calvsrt— OetarU 
Handwerth A Co.— Eipoaltlon Jubilee Four— Firs 
Avollons. 

MOaTTBEAL, CABSTH. ; - 

. Cowboy Wllliama A Daisy— sUson ft Co ls 
Billy Swede Hall— Jerome A AUbright— "Lots A 



Catering to the Profession 

FERDINAND 
BLOCK 

Attorney at Law 

1 112-14 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia 

Extracts of the Domestic tUfottoow Lsnr 

o/ Fennsylvsnia Stat tspon rsquwat. 



McNALLrS BULLETIN NO. 4 

FBICS OSF BSUAB Kg C4FY. 

CONTAINS THE FOLLOWING COafEDT MA- 
TBBIAL: S3 seKaanag Minwity. ig roarmt 
Acts for tae aalet, IS orignul ArS for suUs and 

SSsssV 30 SBrt-Bra Faiemsi, 2 roof -Bftlnj- Trio 
Acta, 2 rattliag QusrUUe Acta, a 'new Comedy 
Sksteb. s treat Tabloid Comedy sad Burleiqne. sa 
Act for tso feraalfs. 13 corking HicHrtl FinX- 
Farla, a gitst sUannd FloalcTnondreai of aUs- 
nlk ODureisstana. 

.Semember. tha Uriel of MeNALLT'S BDUavHN 

No. -41 S oolr en dontr per copy; or will lend 
you BTJUsvriNS Kos. S and « for *!.60, etth 
euney back guarsslsa. 

WI*.McNALLY,81£astt25thSt.,N.Y. 



LADY PARTNER WANTED 

in rube sketch in vaudttillc. State all you da 
'in first letter. AddressB^'rank Tbomisv 9 Har- 
vard street^harjcs^owi^ Mass. i* . ^ 

i-WMffigisi 

Drasnatle Peools in all Itaei . State all details. 
Photos. MATTICE STOCK CO, Milium— j. 

New York. ....... 

COLLEGE OF THE SPOKEN 
WORD, INC. 

BROOKJJNE, 1S4AS3. ' ' >~ 

Professional school of training for the stags 
and motion picture screen. Catalog. 

WANTED— Lady Trick Cyclist 

First sta a S S with own wheel, to go in 
•hip with comedian. "X. Y. Z„" cars 
New York. 



EVENING GOWNS 

» and shtst itisiii atbrhUy warn. laVsS 
stock sf latest SBdelx. rdUU faratsg* <* — 
A. tUCS. SI W«t est. St. Iss Tart. ! 



PLAYS. SKET CHES 

WRITTEN £',V ■ 
Prices, for a Stamp 
E- L. GAMBLE. PLAYWRIGHT 
U ias iMu a, Ofcto 




(First Halt)— OUves— Stanley A Isarde Hogbes. 
(Last Half)— Msrtln Bros.— Henry Frey— flayo- A 
Cayo. .. . ^^___„__ 

' FBOVTBBBCB. B. Z. 

(First Half)— Brown's Dogs— Knox A Inman— 
ArmstNDg A Smith— Conroj A O'Donaen— Brown, 
Gardner ft Bernett. ' " (Lest - Half) — LsaJsw A 
Mitchell— NeweU A Moat— June Milla A Co.— 
Patrick A, Otto^-FIye Musical Misses. 
' SPBTMOFrELD, MASS. 

(First Half)— Louise A Mitchell— NeweU A 
Moat— Jose Mlfla'A Co.— Patrick ft Otto— Five 
Musleal Misses. (Last Half)— Brown's Dogs— 
Knox ft Ioman — Armstrong A Smltb — Coaroy A 
O'Donnell — Brown. Gartner ft Bamett. 
TOB0BTO, CABADA. 

Hsnlon A Arthur — Murphy ft Klein — Francis A 
Haekett— little Lord Huberts— Gorman Bros. — 
Gypsy Bevos. '. 

PALTSABSS » IsOL sT. J. 

Bolden— Five Martini — Maaelle A Wolf— Lunette 
Sisters. 




Glaser, Yaaghas, Musical Stock— Cleveland, 
. O., lndef. ' , ■ C 

nunt's Musical Stock— Boston, Mass.. toiler. 

Howard-Lorn Stock — Rational, Engiewood, 

IU., todef. • 
Hawkins-Webb Co. — Begeot, 'HnskegOB, 

Mich.. Indef. 
Hawkins-Webb Co. (2)— Powers, Grand 

- BapldS, Mich., indef. . 
Keith Stock — Colnmboa, Q^ lndef. 
Keith Playera — Union Hill. N. J. 
Knickerbocker Players— Syracuse, N. X., in- 

def. ..• '_-■•• • _ .: -■ 

Uscomb Players — Majestic, San Francisco, 
Cal., indef. 

Liberty Players — Strand, 8an Diego, Cal, ln- 
def. 

Liberty Players — Nornmbega Park, Mass., to- 
def. 

Lyceum Theatre Stock — Dalath, Minn., In- 

i def. 

Lyric Stock — Lincoln, Neb„ lndef. 

Lyric Theatre Flayers — Hamilton Can. 

MaeLean, Pauline. Stock — Caleron Park, 

- N. T. ' '". 
Majestic Theatre Stock — Los Angeles, CaL,' 

. lndef. 

Manhattan Players — Boci eat erv N. Y.. indeu*. 

Marshall Stock — Washington, D. C, lndef. 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, Cal., lndef. 
Mtotnrn Stock — Milwaukee, Wis., indef. 
Orphenm Playen — Montreal, Can., lndef. 
Otis Olive Players^ — La Fayette, Ind., todef. 
Permanent Players — Orphenm,— Moose Jaw, 
> Saak. Can., lndef. ■•! ".ii'TiB""'" 
?lney Theatre Stock Co. — BoHe, Idaho, ln- 

- del. -.- '"■ ■■ ; • -■ i 
rk Theatre .Stock — TJUca. N3Y., lndef. 
It Players— Springfield, Mass., lndef. 



kesbsrre, -Pssvlnaef: 
-Worcester, Maui, lndef. 
vera — Toronto, CanJiliDdef^. 
Co. — Vancouver. B! C, lndef. 



Poll 
PoU 
PoU Pli 
Bobtos 

Royal I 

Shlpman Co., Bert.— Hot. Springs, Ark., in- 

Savoy Play enri-HamOUm, Can.', Indef. 
Spooner, CecU— Miner's Bronx, N. Y. City. 

indef. 
Stevenson Musical Stock — Hartford, Conn., 

todef. 
Taylor Musical Stock — Penscook, N. H.. In- 



FRFF t-* t- ^ 

rnr.fi i««u« of 

HOW TO MAKEUP 




L 



Writs or Coii 

M. Stoln Cosmetic Co. 

ISO West Stat Street. Iwe Ysrt 



WM. F. (Billy) HARMS 

.- * • ': ,• Hofcoss-n, N. J. - - --- .~t 
THEATRICAL ENTERPRISES *', 

. (Msrsssar of T. B. CO • 

ORCHESTRA 

PIANIST ' 

Ceaawtasl, i w n tnd i ldr . fTjer kn csd iB llnsj. Qonti koat 
siUla 150 Saks Ne> Tork Cny. Six SsfS par wassTsasi 
gas* Hear rawutlii T«o seers' netlsa is iiisssir m 
Miwer. Write LSUI1E SIIGAS, 737 Tsatssasa St., 

WANTED— A PARTNER 



lor Newaltw Cianaj Bsadag Act. Unit be s 
good.talker and. bag nnnc her. M ost have his 
own appsrstus. Address STEVE FINN, SM 
West IBtm St. New York. 

i ' ■ 

Cntnl Fibre Wardrobe 

45 x 21 x u 

$46.00 

wifltM 

$55.00 
Equal to aay 

175.00 trunk, apd 
guaranteed. 

CENTRAL TROHI 
FACTOfiY 

SIMONS sa Ct*. 
Te* An* St. 




BASE BALL 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

POLO GROUNDS 

Aug. 13-15 with Cincinnati 

Aug. 16-19 with Chicago 



TONIGHT BILLS 



6.000 till 
10,000 sail ' 
1B.O00 4x11 
10.000 ««13 

30,000 tiU TDslisttn , Z2.oo zj.( 

(Sx» alaa sasw pries St 4zll n> t~ •""— SS 



»90 

as 



S '".I'. 

B.000 8X8 Twugntcn. 
10.000 SxS ~ 
15.000 8x8 
10.000 8X8 
80,000 8x8 



ess 1.14s, -e Tseuars. 

.« 6..7S g 7.T0 

• 9J5 U-*» 

. 11.00 ,r. 1430 
. U.79 17.05 

13.23 



taolgktMua. sUasr 

emus arloa a. my 
a* ft sngei sri aertas; 



(On ssssrs at -80.000 sad Sea of 

one. Drp. tarsa or m duTenat itrsw. 

n. sad U no sAdWcal cart Oss-sl 

00 <j»U»<»4 »o«»roo[sii of plajs rail, 

St thsts orl i w imta.) ^,-, 

<K UBkB LsM rrStttas, > ■ Ci 
TBS SAZaTTE JMW fSlSTIBC Cl«r*ST, 

T 



Twiutj Te«ri la X2m 



TrlC COWBOY PHILOSOPHEB 
oa THE PeACE CONrCBCNCC 



HARPER * BROTHERS 

KJ7 KswYarai 



BERT LEVEY 
CIRCUIT 

VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SCENERY 



OF ALL KINtrS-FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

American Vehret Scenic Stu dio 

4ST CsswtF TW.tr. BMg. New York 

Phone: Bryant 8493 

■" iw»: PRICE, 



,- -C''--- ;.-i-v>..-.:. I ."■-.' :,vV;w:,.iH-. 



.'•^- 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13^1919 



"I CURED MYSELF OF TUBERCULOSIS" 

"- ..-- . ,,t - - - .. ., - ' - f ' 

Erery sufferer from Weak Lungs— 
everyone afflicted with chronic cough 
— should read this remarkable history 
of a drnggist, afflicted with Tubercu- 
losis, who experimented on himself. 
-seeking a road to health. With his 
simply txeafcmept aov^cough-raeked, 
tortured' 'perso'ii may' bpd quijk relTef 

in a home treatment. ' £ - 

Soothing:, pleasant; anyone may use it under 

plain directions. Jait lerid nemr tad tddreia 

on post card to ADDEUNE, 2KB Capital 
Trust Bldg., Columbus, Ohio. 





n 



ADONIS & CO. (?) 

A NEW ARTISTIC NOVELTY 



DISECnON-AB.THUK OJUN 









A 


REAL 


DOUGHBOY 








fr 


F* 


A 


N 


K 


IM JB 


LL 


13 


Y 






"«• Th. 


Mam 


ppy w« 


>D " 






Wr— 












MyPaJ- 




*-«rf» 







EIVIIVIA KRAUSE 



DDHCTION— JACK FLYNN 



& SCHRAM 

PUTTING 'EM OVER 



HARRY GOULSON 

Character Songs and Stories 



JIMMY CASSON 



The AMERICAN ACE of SONG, 
with FRED KLEM at the PIANO 



SICKELMORE 

t. . " - •' 



LE MESSUKIER 

In "Studio Fancies" 



3 JEIMIM 

VAUDEVILLE'S PRETTIEST OFFERING IN VAUDEVILLE i 

SMILETTA SISTERS 

NOVELTY DE LUXE IN VAUDEVILLE 

MILDRED ROGERS 

Tne Dainty Mis* in 5 Feet of Dancing 



1SI 



JK JAZZ LAND 



Direction— GEO. SOFRAHStt 



»" COLLINS & DUNBAR 

r Arw»y» Wort**;. WsNtasrm Raft., Urn ' 




Cb Ics-or. the . 
In this list, • POSTAL CARD must be — «' I S«,l— Una as ba- 
be St s f Spl with yonr fsdl name and the ssSarsn. t» wficfc the 
aba* al riipl.in followed by th. sexier akeesld b. ■■Mini! 

flllll Iftff th e da te (or n umber) W ISB CUFFE* ba 
were advertised. 



was) letters 
la to b. 
the 



• ""I 
-. ■* 



aumwnn, Joto 
ECt. 

A. 



B." 

BiMfcsVfc, P. 

Carr, Hem 
Oner's ~ 



CaBee, Jta. H. 



>a 



Dale, Wa. 0. 
Dickson, law, 
Pe.stoc s, Tear 
sMstBB, J. S. 
— allllBU. Ted 
ren, Catron 
Frank. Bdn> 
Fl reh, H. H_ 
OwA, Knaw. 
Qrart 

na.F. 



GrtflSa. Peter J. 
OooatU. Assss 

n.*.* Albert I* 

nilssni, Watr 

Bone, Harry 



EaszBtoa. iaa A. 
Hrjetand, 0. V. 
Jackson, nee. P. 



Helb. J. W. 
Klrc Joa B. 
KEhrtde, Pcrer 
Kecriass, Tn 
Lerji. Lester 
Scan, J. E. 
Lewis, Arthar H 

IJrr, H. P. 



taefcdka, lor. 



ShnTer, Cass, 



MaUette, 1. 8. 
laser. Means 
Kedlk. Jsek 



Partcc , V. 



Brink, Jesse 

Bamett. Bfflls 

BaerJex Era 



Far. Bands 

1. J. Vera 

Vjnnn 



Barren. MlMis 
MlHnp Itn. 

Dctant, AdOa 

De Free. Dot - 



MUArd 
i. Lflllsn 
HcrsrrJ, EDOy B> 



UOBBD, HatJ E. 



Batty 



- Blse 
•filler, isssaia 
TH 
Carjrffle 

la 

I L. SUIT: 



Bfrhw. Iras L. 
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If So, Get in Touch With Us at Once . We want 10 Musical Tab. Shows for 

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Wardrobe— AbiUtT— Experience. Address JOHN HI COINS, SSt Seat (Ih St, Chester, Pa. 



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•• : ■: 




■ 



THE NEW TORK CLIPPER 



, ... *:\ 



•■■ -". 



• .« - 



35 



WPICTVRES 



COURT MWM 

SHOWING OF 

"PEG^FILM 

MUST AWAIT FINAL COURT 



Judge Knox, in the United States Dis- 
trict Court, cm Saturday enjoined the 
Famous PI*. y era -Laaky Corporation from. 
releasing. "Peg o' My Heart," pending the 
final determination of the ownership of 
the film rights by the Supreme' Court. He 
acted upon the assumption that the com- 
pany will not sustain appreciable dam. 
ages if the release of the film is post- 
poned. 

The author of the play, J. Hartley Man- 
ners, contends that under his contract 
with Oliver Morosco, he reserved the mo- 
tion picture rights to the play, and has 
appealed from the decision of : the United 
States Circuit Court of Appeals, which 
affirmed the decision of Judge . Julius . M. 
Mayer that the producing rights, in per- 
petuity, 'including the film rights, belong 
to the producer. _-- 

Nathan Bnrkan, counsel for Famous. 
Players, contended that it was a particu- 
larly appropriate time to release "Peg o' 
My Heart" in view of the agitation over 
the Irish situation. 

"I think I am safe in saying that the 
picture itself will not deteriorate in the 
meanwhile, and that the demand for it 
at a later date will be quite as urgent 

as it would be if the picture . were to be 
released in September," declared' Judge 
Knox. "I am not particularly impressed 
by the contention that inasmuch as 'Peg 
o ; My Heart' touches somewhat upon Irish 
affairs, and that there is now more or less 
discussion of questions affecting the re- 
lationship of Ireland and Great Britain, 
the defendant will be seriously damaged 
if the picture is not released now. If this 
picture will not succeed upon its merits, 
aside from any possible appeal it may 
have to partisans upon the political ques- 
tions of Ireland, it has, I think, small 
chance of success. 

"Not only does Manners claim that he 
owns the motion picture rights under his 
contract with Morosconput he contends 
that the film company has committed a 
breach of that contract in making altera- 
tions and additions to the original play in 
adapting it to the screen, contrary to a 
provision in the contract which stipulates 
that no changes shall be made Without his 
consent. 

"Should the present film of the defend- 
ant, based upon the plaintiff's drama, be 
now released and Manners should prevail 
in the Supreme Court his right to pro- 
duce and present such a film of subject 
matter aa ha conceives should be pre- 
sented, would be largely impaired if pot 
entirely foreclosed," he concluded. 

In dismissing the suggestion of the 
counsel for the Aim company that the re- 
lease of the photoplay could not jeopard- 
ize the rights of the author, as he could 
still sue for damages, Judge Knox said 
that the action of the Supreme. Court in 
granting a writ of certiorari should 
operate on the entire controversy and not 
limit the plaintiff to the benefit of an ac- 
counting. 

He also directed Manners to file a bond 
of $25,000 to indemnify the film company 
against loss incurred by reason of delay 
in releasing the photoplay, and said that 
if there is an unreasonable delay in get- 
ting a determination of. the ownership 
of the film rights, the bond may be in- 
creased or the stay vacated. 



5 r-r : — -l - . ■ Rg 

.' NEW COMPANY GETS CHARTER 

r Trentju.n, AU£. J— The, Sea-Jacq FUwc 
\ Print CojnpaDy, is .the name of a new ori r 
ganizstion chartered in the- office ot the 1 
Secretary of State, here, to' operate from 
15 Exchange Place, Jersey City. Their 
agent is the United States Corporation 
Company and through them they will erect, 
operate, conduct, buy and lease film labora- 
tories and studioe for the manufacture,, de- 
veloping and . »«*-ing -of motion pictures. 
The charter also permits them to operate 
theatres and other places of amusement '/-'- 

The. concern is capitalized at $100,000, 
divided into 1,000 shares at $100 each, par. : 
The incorporators are Samuel B. Howard, 
George V. Keilly and Robert K. Thistle. 
The address of the company is 64 Cedar 
Street, New York 



FOX HAS MANY 

FILMS READY 

FOR RELEASE 

BOOKINGS REPORTED HEAVY 



BROADWAY. BILLS ARE GOOD;. 

This week's program* at the Broadway 
picture palaces include "Choosing" a 
Wife," at the Strand; "The Peace of Roar- 
ing River," with Pauline Frederick, at the 
Rial to, and "Wagon Tracks," with Win. 
S. Hart, at the BivolL ■_ ■ 

UNIVERSAL INCREASES STAFF 
Universal has increased its exploitation 
staff by adding an assistant, to each, ex- 
ploitation manager of each exchange. 
They, have provided each exchange with, 
an auto for the purpose of touring the 
territory nearby. G. Mit ford has been at- 
tached to the Toronto exchange of Uni- 
versal as exploitation manager and R. H. 
Parson in the same capacity. 

AH. FISCHER MOVES OFFICES 

. '. A. H. Fischer Features, Inc., have moved' 
their offices from 18 R Forty-first street 
to the Thanhouser studios in New Ro- 
chelle, which they own. All business will 
be transacted from there. 



GETS McDONALD FILMS 

The First National has secured twelve 
Katherine McDonald films, two completed 
and ten to be made within two years. 
Miss MacDonald is the head of her own 
company in California. 



For the season of 1919-1920 William 
Fox has announced the first of a large 
number of productions which are ready 
for release at all „ Fox exchanges in the 
country. ' '. ' 

j According to the reports received from, 
the various branches, the advance book- 
ings on aB films now ready for the ex- 
hibitor are "very heavy. The exhibitor 
Who visits any of the exchanges can see 
a full line of paper for each production, 
the names of which follow below,' ranging 
from twenty-four sheet posters down- to 
one-sheets. Each one of the films listed 
below are now ready and will be released 
during September and October. 

The Mat includes: "Checkers," a trig 
special; "Wolves of the Night," starring 
William Farnum and written by E. Lloyd 
Sheldon; "La Belle Russe" with Theda 
Bara; "The Splendid Sin," featuring 
Madlaine Traverse; "The Winning 
Stroke," with George Walsh starred; the 
Bud Fisher Mutt and Jeff Cartoons and 
the Fox Sunshine Comedies. 

All of these can be inspected by -the 
exhibitor before release, in accordance 
with the Fox policy. •...-.. 

SUES DENVER COMPANY 
Denver, CoL, Aug. 9. — The National 
Film Corporation, of Denver; is being sued 
by E. J. Johnson for $22,000 damages. He 
alleges that he leased the ground .with' the 
company's plant to them for $13,5$4.61. 
The film concern was to have the ground 
and an option on it till 1920 and was to 
assume a mortgage held by Jacob C. Jones. 
Johnson alleges that the firm, has failed 
to live up to its agreement as to lease and 
mortgage terms. He asks a receivership. 




WORLD GETS WEBER PICTURES 
World Pictures has signed to. release aB 

of tie Lawrence Weber Productions to be 
made in the futur e. 



JACK VON TILZER 

The New York branch office of United Artists 
Corporation— tbe "Big Four" — is in full swing 
with Jack Von Tttzer presiding as Sales Man- 
ager. 

Mr. Van Tflier. who is a member of the well 
known musical family, came into tbe nwtinii 
picture business two years ago. 
' ' Muse pubhahing is so closely allied to the 
theatrical field that Mr. Von Tilier 



MUST STOP RETTTLINC FILMS 
Washington, -Aug. 9. — The jjjfaderal., 
Trade Commission, in its case against the 
W. H. Productions Company, has decided 
as an unfair method of competition, the 
refitting of old motion pictures featuring 
William S. Hart, without "clearly and un- 
mistskably" informing the public that they' 
are old films with new names. The com- 
pany have re titled twenty of the old Hart' 
pictures. , Tha commission ordered the con- 
cern to discontinue"the practice. 

* :.t 

buy site for studio 

The Motion Picture Producing Com- 
pany of America has announced- the pur- 
chase of a site at Clarkaon avenue and 
East Thirty-seventh street, Brooklyn, on 
which a modern studio will be 'erected for 
the production of the company's films. At 
the same time, the company - announced 
that it has leased, temporarily, the 
Beaver Studio, at Dongon Hills, Staten 
Island, where the "King Cole Comedies," 
featuring Sammy Burns, will be made. 

KANSANS FIGHT TAX 

Kansas Cur, Aug. & — The' Kansas 
State Exhibitors' Organization, represent- 
ing the exhibitors of fifty towns, held a 
meeting recently and declared themselves 
against the continuance of the Federal Ad- 
mission tax and will do all in its power to 
bring, about the repeal of the law. 



equipped with tbe experience and the _ 

- that have stood him in such good stead 



as exchange «*»*, 



CHICAGO HOUSE PUTS IN FILMS 

Chicago, 111., Aug. &, — Tbe Playhouse, 
in this city, has been taken over by A G. 
Spencer for a period of five years. The 
bouse is to be renovated, an organ InatlTlwi, 
and the theatre opened With a purely pic- 
ture program. ;.. . ' .. -*v 



BROOKLYN STRAND OPENS SOON > 

when tha Strand Theatre, Brooklyn, 
situated on the corner of Fulton street 
and Rockwell place, opposite the Orphenm 
and next door to the Majestic, opens that*) 
will be a surprise in store for many who 
think they have seen all there is to see in 
the way 'of picture palaces. The new 

theatre, will make its predecessor in Man- 
hattan look small and uninteresting in 
comparison. *■' 

The new house is large is proportion 
and has a magnificent lobby. It will hare ' 
a seating capacity of 3,200 and will pre- 
sent a program similar to that of the 
Strand in Manhattan. It is the purpose:©? 
the management to 'present the identical 
pictures and musical program. 

John Loveridge, managing 'director of 
the new house, will! have as ene of hk 
assistants Louis Gilbert, who will actress 
assistant manager and treasurer and h*vs> 
under his supervision the three nor Basset 
girls that the theatre will require. Walts* 
Mel via will be superintendent; Carl Reiser 
will conduct the orchestra, the siae of 
which has not yet been determined. *T>»trT- 
Victor Wilson will handle the publicity 
and Mr. Loveridge will • do mst of the 
booking. He has planned to give high- 
class musical acts and operettas later on 
in conjunction with tbe picture programs. 

The theatre will be opened on the night, 
of the 29th, at which time there will be 
an invited audience, and at which, it is - 
planned to have the Paulist choir sing a 
hymn of dedication, provided sanction can 
be gained. The theatre will be open to 
the public on Saturday, the 30th of Au- 
gust. ■ ;.> 

The opening feature will be Geraldme 
Farrar in "The World and Its Women."- 

TO SHOW FILMS C*N TRUCK 
Dr. Francis Holly, Director of the Bn> 
reau of Commercial Economies. Washing** 
ton, D. C, announced last week that Be* - 
bureau- will supervise throughout the 
State of New York tie exhibition of in- 
dustrial motion . pictures ' produced to 
arouse interest in good roads, and to vis- 
ualize common faults of automobile and 
truck drivers. . . 

The films wQl.be shown on a moving 
motion picture theatre, built on a fully 
equipped motor truck celled the "Vic- 
tory, which is. one of the seven trucks 
now being used in the free exploitation 
of motion picture* throughout the coun- 
try. . The New York tour started Aug. la 
The picture for the advocation of good 
roads is entitled "The Open Road to. a.' 

Greater America." The film showing the 

dangers, of careless drivers is "Careless 
America," which has already bean shown, 
in a number of New York theatres. 

• WALDORF DICKERS OVER FILM 
. "Where Bonds Are Loosed," the WeJ* 
dorf Photoplay that was originallv in- 
tended for disposal on a State fight* 
basis, may be .handled, instead, through 
a' distributor. Wires aire now being 
' pulled with that end in view, but if a 
satisfactory arrangement cannot be agreed 
upon between a distributing agency and 
the Waldorf interests the pictures will be 
sold as a State rights feature, as origi- 
nally contemplated. 

TO STATE RIGHT HALL ROOMS 
Jack and Harry Cohn refused the offer 
to let the "Hall Room Boys" go as a pro-" 
gram picture and are arranging to re- 
lease their comedies ae a State right 
proposition. Joe Brandt, now with the 
National Film Corporation, has taken 
charge of the sale of the films. 

TO DISTRIBUTE DWAN FILMS 

Through a contract between the May- 
flower Photoplay Corporation and ReaJ- 
ert Pictures Corporation the letter 
-the. right to distribute the AHa» E 
production. The first of Uteawie.* - 
of Fortune." 



. 



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POLICY 1919 -lQ^O 













Sack 




COMEDY 

is an act of 
greatest 
' ower 





exchange for 





cr 




rs 



. •..-•: 



MUTR 

action cartoons 

take only 7 minutes 

to run 



:£' 



.->... 



i ••■?..•' 




makes them 

an ideal filler -in 

so that waits may 
be avoided 

CAPT.BUD 5IS&ER 



*-«. ** »r .- - : .,*■ * 



biggest laugh 
in the woiid 







:..v. : «s 

■■- ::.< 
. ■'.■■ 

* 




houses am 





- '-V-'-' "*j «<.••.". -,y :■' .: 

■-/'.'- :/: '■ ----J" 

WILLIAM F0X«W-RSHBEHAN' ;./ ggg 



"rt^iMiasr 



i 



OX ENTERTAINMENTS 



IAls/L FOX 



PLAIN WORDS 
jCrPLAINMEN 

i/r has taken five years and sue months 

v./ for the R)X Film Corpora t ion to .become 
the greatest film organization in the world- 
five .years - a long time in the film in* 
ctastiy- but it takes time to do thixig's 
... - veil-. Its success .is due to genuine show 
manship- the giving to the public what the 
public wanted to pay to see- 

f £ox. Exhibitors admit that they love art 

hut that they also admire the Fox. color 

| scheme of a fat bankroll, and there's a lot 



■ 
- 



■- 



- 

= - if- .V 



'-':-, 



:.-:r.r:rC- r *<*; 



of horse sense in that idea 



. ■ -:■ — 
■ 



The past of the Fox Film Corporation is 
the firm foundation of a tremendously 
successful business - the present is the pro- 
vision for theatres great and small of at- 
tractions that satisfy and make money - 
the future is a constantly rising tide of 
big business in which the exhibitor is the 
biggest .profit maker- 

Fox isn't a highbrow and Fox isnt a low- 
brow-he's a showman who has made money 
for the exhibitor and money for himself - 



■ 
*, 



- 
- 



- 



. 



- 



- 

■ 



TOR your new season dont chase rainbows of 

<?■■ promises' stick to the showmanship certain. 

ties- Your one big problem is the question of 

real entertainment because entertainment is 
the thing your public wants and will pay for* 

fox pictures for the new season provide fully for 
great theatres and small theatres- There will be 
enough m -volume, in class and above all in genuine 
human appeal- The line is a complete line.it leaves 
' no .theatre unprovided for, it supplies all the needs 
of the world 3t large 

Read the announcement plans, policies and pro- 
grams of all the others -Then give strict attention 
to what follows on these pages — * then make 
/your own decision as a showman 

.Fox does not criticise anyone for making fewer 
r pictures-but he insists upon supplying the positive 
I demands of the most active market in the history 
of motion pictures - and, therefbre,in the season cf 
1919 ~UO Fox provides foe all theatres; not merely 
for one class* 



3 EXTRAORDINARY 
SEE GIALS 
£onq fellows immorbaL 

EVANGELINE 

(Jimrtf Blossom's CHECKERS . 
jrom. the most suceessfidj^atfs eoerjxnned. 

<Ihe lQlO CINEMELODRAMA 

Should a Husband Forgive 
and two to he announced * 



8 
8 

8 

3 
26 

16 

Cjfik fox Sunshine comedies 
.^o mutt £ jeff cartoons 

fox News Weekly 
A Fifteen Episode Serial 

Greater than any ever attempted ! 

> ■ ' v - i ■ 

.. ...-.-.. -,-/.- 

-•■ : . ;* "■'• -. .3 .j ,:,.,.:-" 

'■--.-•■ :;.•'■• -f 3 ? :"■■'■ 

■■■:■ . - ■ •• ■ - \ ■ • ■ - -i ■■-'■■ 



WILLIAM FARNUM 

PRODUCTIONS 

PEARL WHITE 

PRODUCTIONS 

TOM MIX 

PRODUCTIONS 

THEDA BARA 

SPECIAL PROUCTIONS 

VICTORY PICTURES 

with, WILLI 'M P- RUSSELL . 
GLADYS BROCRWELL and 

G EORG E WALS H 
EXCEL PICTURES 

with PEGGY HYLAND. 

MADLAINE TRAVERSE 
ALBERT BAY & ELINOR FAIR- 



• 




■m 



- ■ ■ 



FUM COBLPOBATIOK 

WILLIAM fOX. co w-R SMEEHAN 

Tr est dent genCfoanagcr 



FOX ENTERTAINMENTS 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 13, 1919 



DuNORD 



In a Classic Dancing Oddity 
DIRECTION— TOM JONES 



SINGER AND 
INSTRUMENTALIST 

The Only Chin— YodmUr in the World 
SPECIAL SCENERY DIRECTION TOM JONES GORGEOUS COSTUMES 



CHONG 



THOMAS P. JACKSON & CO. 

"ONCE A THIEF" 

By LAURENCE GRATTAN IN VAUDEVILLE 



GERTRUDE MORGAN 

Tlte Happy Little IVIlss 

DIRECTION— MARINELLI 



BERT 



JOSEPHINE 



WILCOX— LaCROIX & CO. 



«» 



Now Doing New Act— "COLD COFFEE 1 

Br CHAS. HORWTTZ DIRECTJON-LAWRENCE SCHWAB 



JACK GARDNER 

In Pictures for die Summer 



MARION and BILLY 

VAUDEVILLE'S YOUNGEST TEAM 
Singing, Dancing and Talking — In Vaudeville 



LOOK US OVER 

JOHM1* NELLIE OLMS 

The Watch Wizards 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



RF11F 



EVELYN 



MONSELLE&WHITESTONE 



Sinking and Piano 



la Vandevflla 



ROBERT 



AILEEN 



LE ROY & HARVEY 



Of VAUDEVILLE 



ALTHOFF SISTERS 



TWO GIRLS AND THE PIANO 



DIRECTION-HARRY WEBER 



J. C. TOOT & PAL 



Original Comedy 
Toots and Pal in On* 



with Some Dancing Dog 

Direction JAS. PURSELL 



WILLIAM CONWAY 



THE IRISH PIANIST-rN VAUDEVILLE 



The Littie Magnet in Vaudeville 



LUCYkMONROE & CO. 



In «* 

DIRECTION— GLADYS F. BROWN, Palace 



Bid*., New York 



GEORGE 

BOOKED SOLID— LOEWS CIRCUIT 



DDL, TOM JONES 



l\i 



DIRECTION— LEW LESLIE 



D* VAUDEVILLE 



DAISJ MICHAELS 

NEW YORK FOLLIES 

In an all alar east Musical Comedy Entitled "A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING." 
Two Acta and Twain Baeawa, 



In^RHYME A1VD 

DDL— JOE MICHAELS 



»» 



EDDIE 



ETHEL 



STAFFORD & WATTS 



THAT CLEVER PAIR 



DDL— MEYER B. NORTH 



JAMES 



CLARENCE 



JOHNSON and PARSON 

"Jazz That's Jazz'! 

DIRECTION— PHIL BUSH 



HARRY OAKS & CO 



■ la tL* 
n/wwgi\ SOUD KEITH TIME 



Classic, "Behind the Patera** 

DinxcrioN-^iAac 



DOOLEY - NAIMOLI - McGEE 

COMEDY. HARMONY. SINGING, TALKING 

■%■ l|f|| FOR STOCK REPERTOIRE. AMATEUR COMPANIES, 

m§ I n W m LARGEST ASSORTMENT m THE WORLD. Bosks for boms 

I ■ m M M bJ S , ±f5"* D > ? e * TO I 1 ***' , P * t ? r V, Sentry. Ur^ Jarler'. Wu 

■ ■■ BTK 8 W Works. CatsJone Free I Fir*! Free! 

" — ■ m ^ SAMUEL FRENCH. 2 Wat 38th St. Rev York 



LEW FREY 



FROM OVER THERE 
On the Loaw Tliii Thanks to Geo. *«*— H 



CH AS. GERARD 



One Am 

Piano Novelty 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



E.F. ALBEE 



X J. MURDOCK 



f. r. proctor 



B. F. Keith 
Vaudeville Exchange 



(Agwaew) 



(Palace 



York) 



B. F. KEITH EDWARD F. ALBEE A. PAUL KEITH 

F. F. PROCTOR— FOUNDERS 



Artists Can 



Direct by 



S.K. 



WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

OF THEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX, President 

Offices, 130 Wet 4M. St, New York 
JACK W. LOEB 



EDGAR ALLEN 



L 



wit* 



12 to «, or by 



Attention Vaude ville Acts 

John Quigley 1 Theatrical Agency, Inc. 

He* 



Snort 



Ag mac j. VaadanDe and ootdoor 
184 BoyUfam. St, 



ALLEN 

SPENCEF 
TENNEY 



VAUDEVILLE WRITER 

1493 Broadway • ■ New York City 

We opened in Pitufield {or the United (July 2 1 ) 
next to doting, and we were one big hit. The best 
act we ever had or did.— Goldie & Ayres. 



INSURE YOUR M ATERIAL AGAINST THEFT 

REGIS TER YOU R ACT 

SEND IN YOUR MATERIAL 



THIS COUPON «iH be numbered and attached and s M rtHntt win be returned to yon u 
an ackDOWledsneBt. and for furore reference. The eoatribotlee, should be **my* plainly by the 
ptir s mi or firm « undine; the aaaaej aad ehnald be eadoread by the stage manager of the skew or 



of the hoote where the act it 
ide by the names and numbers 
Address yeas contributions to 



need or ether wines see. run her acta owl odgm eat win be 



The 



Bureau, 



', New York 



NEW YORK CUPPER REGISTRY BUREAU t 
fill limit p l ease Bad copy of ray 



for Rna,ialistiocu 

NAME... 



ADDRESS 



PAPER HATS 



GUS K1JPPERT, 4S 



Oat, 25.. a*. 
Cooper 3o>x N. 



SONGWRITERS and ACTS 

Our melodies, words and special songs guar- 



anteed- Free samples 
WARD A CRAY, JSU 



request WOOD. 
New York. 



C L I F» F» E Fl 

BUSINESS INDEX 

Adif rtlsfsnts not aaaaafhaa one line ia 
length will be nahUsTtod, properly rlsieHled, in 
thin index, at the rate of $10 for one year (9 
ilioil). A COPT of The New York dipper 
win be sent free to each advertiser white the 
advertisement is running. 



Joseph A. O'Brien. 1«B Broadway, Hew York 

Qty. 
Edward Doyle. Attorney, 431 Merchants Beak 
Bldg.. In diana polis. lud. 
mes S. Kloi nin in. Equitable Bldg-. 1* 

St., Chicago. 
MUSICAL GLASSES. 

A. Brannnelss, 1013 Napier Are., Richmond asEL 
N. Y. 



B'way, New York Qty. 
F. L. Boyd. 17 No. La Salle i 



SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

HI -UJ- las Sooth High St, sMsawawas O. 
SCENERY FOR HUB AND SAUL 
Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 
Was. W. Delaney, 117 Park Row, New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C Goss Co.. 10 Atwater St., Detroit, Mkfa. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co, S3 Wsihingtoo St, Bos- 
ton, Mast. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
A. W. Geratner Co., 6M 8th Are. (41st SO. 
N. Y. • 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobson. 271 West 130tb St, New York 
Qty. 

VIOLINS AND SUPPLIES. 
Augutt Germander a Sooa, 141 W. 43ad St, 



TAYLOR TRUNKS 



S. ■!..' •■■• ( 



C. A. Tavlor Truuk Works 



DR FREDERICK 

DENTIST 

Offlos Hours. • A. M--7 P. M. 
A. M.-J P. M. Breaaesje by . 
Jpt rial ratse tn the iinfmlue, 
Ava, Bat, lU-lMth Sss, New 
nfaeaw. Cathedral gag. Hisses 
Insane dna. 


SOBEL 

Besnko n i» 

lSSSS^rvsth 

York. Tate- 

roftatSw- 



SCENERY 



Dye, Oiler Wat 

SCHELL SCENIC STUDIO. COLUMBUS, O. 



Wardrobe Prop Trunks, *5.°° 

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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 20, 1919 



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NEW YORK, AUGUST 20, 1919 



VOLUME LXVn-No. B 
Pncs, Tea Crnta, *4j00 • Year 



PLAN SOCIETY 
OF THEATRICAL 
^SOLDIERS 

WILL JOIN AMERICAN LEGION 

For the purpose of forming ■ Poet of 
the American Legion to consist of theatrical 
men who took a part in the war, a pre- 
liminary gathering of actor folk anil pub- 
licity men met at Keen'B Chop House, on 
Forty-fourth street, Monday afternoon on 
the invitation of Wells Hawks, Walter P: 
Wanger, George S. Wheat and William O. 
Newman, who stood sponsor! for the pro- 
pose^organlaation.' '." 

Wells Hawks was elected chairman of 
the meeting; -while Ralph Nevarro, of the 
H. 4 H. Moving Picture Productions, was 
appointed temporary secretary. On ac- 
count of the actors' parade and the strike, 
many who would otherwise have been 
present were absent. Among those who 
are expected to join are Charles B. Dfl- 

Hnylijun , Earl Booth, Everett Butterfield, 
Martin Casey, James Loughborough, Will- 
iam Harrigan, and others who could not 
pot in an appearance at the preliminary 
meeting. . . 

The committee on membership, inviting 
all of the White light's soldiers to a meet- 
ing at Keen's Chop House on Friday at 
4 o'clock, consists of Wells Hawks, Will- 
iam H. Cook (For Film Company), F. W. 
Stokes, the Tandeville agent; Louis B. 
O'Shaughnessy, of the Tale Club; Howard 
J. Green, -a theatrical newspaperman ; Otto 
Henkel, an .actor; John Donovan, Law- 
rence Schwab, a vaudeville agent; Ralph 
Nerarro and Jacques Kopfstein, moving 
picture producers. 

The meeting was attended by Frank 
Nickerson, a representative of the Amer- 
ican T^gi/m, who explained the purposes 
of the organisation and will act as organ- 
izer until the post obtains its charter. It 
has been suggested that the post be known 
as the Drew Post, in honor of Sidney 
Drey's son, who was killed overseas. 



GOLDWYN SIGNS JACK PICKFORD 

Jack Pickford celebrated his twenty- 
third birthday last Saturday by signing a 
contract with tie Gold wyn Company. Un- 
der the terms of the conrtact he will ap- 
pear in pictures for the next three yean 
exclusively for the Goldwyn Company, at 
an average weekly salary of $2,750. 

The contract, drawn by Nathan Burkan, 
Pickford's attorney, also provides that he 
is to appear in a total of eighteenpicturea 
at tile rate of six each year. The first 
in which he will appear . is The little 
Shepherd of Tn«gdnm Come," from the 
hovel by John Fox, Jr. 
. Following the signing of the contract 
late Saturday afternoon at the Goldwyn 
offices, Pickford wen to his home in Great 
Neck, -which he . rented from Raymond 
Hitchcock for the! summer. There, his 
wife, Olive Thomas,. the former Ziefeld 
"Follies'' show girl, who is now a motion 
picture star 'appearing in. Selenitic pic- 
tures, arranged a birthday . party in his 
honor. The guests included Blanch Ring, 
Charles Winninger, Thomas Meighan, Tony 
Moreno, Marshall Neilan and Nathan Bur- 
kan. ;. 

On Monday of this week, Pickford left 
for the Coast, where he will begin working 
in his first picture for the Goldwyn Com- 
pany almost immediately after his arrival 
in Los Angeles. 



ALEX CARR LEAVES WOODS 
After being under the management of 
A. H. Woods for the last three years, 
during which time he appeared with 
Barney Bernard in the "Potash and Perl- 
mutter" plays, Alex Carr has left the 
Woods management and is now preparing 
to appear under his own management in 
a new three-act comedy called "The 
Rounder." 

The play was written by Ben Harrison 
Arkow and a corporation called the Alex- 
ander Carr Corporation has been organ- 
ized to produce it. Other principals thus 
far chosen to support Carr are Sam Sid- 
man and Mattie Keen. The play was to 
have gone into rehearsal last week,, but 
they have been postponed until after the 
actors' strike is settled. 



SUES WILLIAM ELLIOTT 

A . judgment .was obtained by default 
early . last week- against William Elliott, 
erstwhile member of the firm of Corn- 
stock, Elliott and. Gest, who withdrew 
from that firm several months ago and 
is at present in London, amounting to 
$525 and in favor of Mrs. Bella Howard, 
who sued to recover on a promissory note 
given by Elliott for money loaned. 

According to Edwin Simpson, Mrs. 
Howard loaned Elliott money which the 
latter used in conducting his theatrical 
affairs over a year ago. Most of the 
money thus obtained by him, Elliott paid 
back. But the attorney says that there 
remained a balance of more than $1,000 
which Elliott failed to pay when due, 
Mrs., Howard holding Elliott's note as 
security. 

She brought suit for the full amount, 
and from time to time, while the suit was 
pending, Elliott paid back various sums. 
When he left for. Europe about two 
months ago there was still a balance due, 
it is claimed, of almost $500. With in- 
terest and costs the amount was brought 
up to $525 and a judgment for that 
amount' was obtained. 

The plaintiff's attorney stated early 
this week that he was preparing to attack 
moneys he claimed was still due Elliott 
from the firm of Comstock, Elliott and 
Gest. •-...-. *• 



STAGE HANDS, TO AID ACTORS, 
MAY PULL NATION-WIDE STRIKE 



P. F. SHEA BUYS HOUSE 

P. P. Shea, the manager, last week pur- 
chased the four-story studio apartment 
house at 414 Riverside Drive, which ■ he 

will remodel. Harry S. Hechheimer was 
tie attorney in the deal. 



ZIEGFELD GETS "VILLAGE" GIRLS 
. Flo Ziegf eld's eye for the pulchritudin- 
ous among one of the best known of our 
sexes, namely, the female, led him down 
to the rival "Follies" show in Greenwich 
Village last week and the result is the 
show downtown is minus three of its most 
finely proportioned and photographed show 
girls. . ., . . . 

The girls Ziegfeld gathered from the 
rival show are: Irene Matthews, Dene 
Msrcellus and' Billy Weston, this trio be- 
ing lured to the New Amsterdam Roof, 
where they are scheduled to appear in 
the "Frolic" shows by Ziegf eld's offer of 
$75 a week to each of them. 



of International Alliance Say» His Union 
Maddens Will Go the Limit to Help Wu 
More Houses Close d 



and 



A nationwide walk-out of stage hands 
and musicians growing out of the strike 
started by Charles: Q- Shay, president ot 
the International Alliance of Stage Em- 
ployees and Machine Operators, on Satur- 
day night, is a probability unless the strike 
Of actors BOW on is ' shortly ended. On 
Monday night the strike- of the musicians 
and stage hands extended to four more 
Broadway theatres, with more- walk-outs of 
a -similar nature slated to follow. 

Shay early this week' stated that al- 
though he regretted to be forced to call a 
strike, the onion' is determined to go 
the limit if no settlement Is reached. 

These sympathetic, strikes were called 
suddenly and unexpectedly, for it had been 
ascertained from reliable sources that the 
stage hands would not walk out for at 
least some time to come nor without giv- 
ing notice. The reason for the change in 
their decision is laid to the fact that the 
managers resorted to the bringing in of 
the Danbury Hatters' case which,' the 
stage hands claim, was done to intimidate 
the actor and to hold a managerial club 
over him. This action on the part of the 
managers is claimed to have aroused the 
wrath of not only the stage hands' but of 
organised labor and to have changed the 
attitude of the' unionist from one of almost 
indifference to hot resentment and-' a desire 
to aid the striking actors in every way 
possible, as fellow trades-union workers. 

On Monday night the following theatres 
and shows were dark: Cohan and Harris, 
"The Royal Vagabond" ; Knickerbocker, 
"Listen, Lester"; Century, "Chu Chin 
Chow"; Century Roof, "Midnight 
Whirr; Sbobert, "Oh, What a Girl"; 
Lyric "The Five Million": Broadburst, 
"The Crimson Alibi"; Republic, "A Voice 
in the Dark"; Princess, "Nightie Night"; ' 
Gaiety, "Ughtain'"; Globe, "She's a Good 
Fellow" ; Forty-fourth Street, "Gaieties of 
mST; Marine Elliott, "38 Bast"; Am- 
sterdam, "Ziegfeld Follies"; Cort, "A 
Regular Fellow"; Amsterdam Root, "Mid- 
night Frolic" ; Forty-eighth Street, "Those 
Who Walk in Darkness" ; Selwyn, "The 
Challenge - '; Astor, "East Is West," 

Shows that are now running but which 
may feel the effect of a strike order at any 
time are the Booth Theatre, "The Better 
'Ole"; Winter Garden, "Monte Crista, 
Jr.."; Playhouse, "At 9:45." 

Shows that seem to be exempt from the 
strike are the Fulton, "John Ferguson"; 
Miller, "La La Locffle" ; Greenwich' Vil- 
lage, "Greenwich Village Follies": Ca- 
sino, "A Lonely Romeo"; Liberty, "Scan- 
dals of 1919"; Central, "Peek-a-Bod." 

Otis Skinner;- who is spending his vaca- 
tion at Estes Park, Colorado, has resigned 
from the Equity Association. 

Monday night added four more theatres 
to the actors* score when the stage hands 
and musicians, following the lead that 
their fellow-unionists had laid down on the 
previous night, walked out of the follow* 
ing theatres: Selwyn, The Challenge": 
Astor, "Bast Is West"; Forty-eighth 
Street, "Those Who Walk in Darkness"; 
and "The Midnight Frolic" on the New 



Amsterdam Roof. History repeated itself 
so far as the details of the walk-outs were 
concerned. Word did not reach the man- 
agers until it was nearly time' for' the cur- 
tain to rise, and then announcements were 
made, to' crowds of disappointed patreaa 
that they could report to the box-offlce and 
get their money back, if being impossible 
to give a performance. 
.No new shows opened. 
Despite a persistent rain, the «+»*Mng> 
actors held a parade on Monday, as had 
been scheduled. This is probably the first 
time that strikers ever received permission 
from the police to parade. The event was 
made even more spectacular by the fact 
that the rain did not dampen the actors' 
spirits, the parade taking place just as it 
had been planned with about twenty-five 
hundred actors, stage, hands and musicians 
in line. 

The shows that were represented in the 
parade were as follows: "Lightnln'," "Obu 
Chin Chow," "Better 'Ole," "89 Bast, , • "A 

Bashful Hero," "At 9:45," ■"The Royal 
Vagabond," "Oh , What a G iri," "Adam 
end Eva," "Nightie Night," "Follies," 
"Gaieties of 1919," "Crimson Alibi," "Five 
O'clock." "Listen, Lester," "She's a Good 
Fellow," "Somebody's Sweetheart," "Jut 
a Minute," "Please Get Married," "Seven 
Miles to Arden," "Experience," "A Prince 
There Was," "East Is West,-" "First Is 
Last," "The Challenge," "Purple Slipper," 
"Little Simplicity," "The Passing 8bow," 
"A Voice in the Dark," "Too Many Hus- 
bands," "The Five Million," "Oh, Lady, 
Lady," "Maytlme," "Sometime," "Monte 
Cristo, Jr.," and "She Would and She 
Did." 

The parade took about twenty-two min- 
utes to pass a given point and marched 
well, considering the. inclement weather. - 

The managers' remained'' inactive on 
Monday, except that they were granted 
an .injunction by Judge Richard Lydon, 
restraining Ed Wynn from appearing on 
the stage at the Lexington Theatre on the 
grounds that he had a contract with the 
Shnberts. Wynn performed, however, as 
per program, but, instead of "appearing 
on the stagy sought to get around the 
injunction by standing in the orchestra 
pit and doing bis act as if he .had Just 
gotten out of his orchestra seat to talk 
to the audience, and, in the words of one 
of the Equity officials, "anyone has a 
right to talk." 

"We are making this case against Wynn 
a test case," stated William A Page 
earlier in the evening. "We could have 
brought rfmiiag injunctions against almost 
every one in the show, but one will be 
enough to score our point and to prove 
the -validity- of our contract. We had -no 
desire to break up the show.". 

William Klein was the attorney who 
obtained the injunction against Wynn. - '.- 

According to Captain Everett Butter- ' 
field, who had charge of the Lexington 
show, the first night netted between |8jO0O ' 
and $6,000, leaning toward the latter 
{Continued on pqgt 32.) '•'■'. 



THE NEW YOJtK ^fctPFER 






?%£g^mm 1919 



&3^%g&$i 



m:M 



I ■ v 



After 



EY SHOW TO CHARGE 

ON ROAD TOUR 



SL Louis This Week, Will Open in Detroit, 
Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Chicago and 

& Then New York ./;■> ." 



Chicago, 1TL, Aug. 14.— The Jack 
De-npeey All-Star Vaudeville Show will 
opoiiaSt Louis August 17 for one week's 
engagement, dosing there the following 
Sunday night. The company win be com- 
posed 6r Jack Dempsey, Angel Sisteray 
Million Dollar Dolls (tabloid), "An-Beir 
ft*" a. Night? Bertluv Jan*-- Gilbert and 
three- other veasoWflle^aeta. .-' : • .. 

Raymond Jaeoby, of Linick and Jaeoby, 
annqonced to The Cxiiteb that the prices 
roverningthe show win be the same as 
charged by ZLegfeld/for his -Follies" pro- 
duction, $3JS0 top.'." _" .'." " 

The company has been routed as tot- 
lows: August 25, New Detroit Opera 
House, Detroit, Mich.; September 1, 



Colonial Theatre, Chicago, m. ; September 
8, Metrooplitan Opera House, Philadelphia, 
Pa. ; September 15, Nixon Theatre, Pitta- 
burgh, Pa.- 

The route from Pittsburgh has not, as 
yet, been completed, but the company will 

:' be taken into. New York City, where a 
theatre, is -being arranged for them. 
The production, win have three. on the 

' managerial staff., back . with the show and 
four in advance. ": The four in advance wfll 
be headed by Billy McCarney, who .wfll be 
assisted by Dana Hayes, Frank Raymond 
and Laraey Litchenneld. The managerial 

""'staff back with the show wfll be composed 
of Nel Holmes, assisted by Norman Fields 
' and Johnny Jones. The aggregation will 
travel in private cars. 



"'".'. FRANK GERSTEN SUED 
-Frank Gersten, the burlesque producer, 
and his wife, Adeline Gersten, are being 
sued in the City Court by Leon Fneden- 
rich and Ernest Baer, formerly Gersten s 
partners in the theatrical business in the 
Bronx. ... 

The action was brought to recover the 
ran of $1,500 which the plaintiffs claim 
ia due on an unpaid note made by Gers- 
ten, July 14, 1914, and which was en- 
dorsed by his wife. 

In their complaint, filed by House, 
Grossman and Vorhaus, Friedennch and 
Baer allege that the Gersten note was 
payable on demand, but that it has never 
been settled. . _ ,... 

The defendants, through Louts Martin 
Levy, have interposed a_ counterclaim 
whieh seta up various item* in which vary- 
ing amounts are alleged to be due from 
fYiedenrici and Baer to the defendants. 
These aggregate $1,914.55. 
- The defendants also claim that the note 
ia question waa given by them to the 
plaintiffs so that the latter could take up 
a previous note which the Gerstens had 
given to Friedenrich and Baer for the pur- 
pose of raising ready cash with which to 
pay salaries of employees at the Royal 
Theatre, Bronx, which the litigants joint- 
ly controlled at the time. This note waa 
payable in thirty days and waa discounted 
at one of the banks in the Bronx. 

Subsequently, because the Royal Thea- 
tre failed to pay under their management, 
and bid fair to revert back to its original 
owners, the" Henry Morgenthau Company, 
they negotiated so that the Keith interests 
acquired the house,, thereby earning for 
themselves commissions amounting to 
£2,500, no part of which, Gersten claims, 
was given to him. 



! 



SUED . FOR COWN 



Ruth MacTamany, erstwhile principal in 
"The Lady in Red" show, was sued last 
-week by Hickson, the tailor, and a judg- 
ment was rendered against her for 
$227.35. 

According to the complaint filed in the 
Third" District Municipal Court by Braun 
& Solomon, attorneys for Hickson, Miss 
MacTamany purchased a gown from the 
plaintiff in November, 1915, valued at 
$175. She failed to pay for it, the com- 
plaint aUeges. The judgment rendered 
aeainst her by default last week includes 
taterest from the aHeged date of the 
gown's purchase and costs. , 

WILLIAMSPORT HOUSE RE-OPENS 

WruJAjrerowr, Pa-, Aug. 18.— The Ma- 
jestic Theatre, here, after remaining dark 
for eight weeks, wfll re-open for the sea- 
«m of 19W-1920 on Aug. 25. For the 
remainder of the year the house wiDbe 
devoted to one-night stands- Vaodevflle 
ana pictures wfll probably be introduced 
into the theatre later in the season. 



FILM ACTRESS SUES BACKER 

. Ray .Emory, a. motion picture actress 
who formerly lived at both the Aator and 
Somerset Hotels here, but whose home is 
in Irvington, N. J., where she is now liv- 
ing, caused the arrest last week of Alex- 
ander Collis, wealthy owner of the chain 
of Presto restaurants throughout Jersey, 
who recently backed her in the motion 
picture business. - He was arrested last 
Thursday in Newark on an order signed 
by Justice Anderson of the New Jersey 
Supreme Court and was released under 
$5,000 bail, which he furnished in cash 
soon after his arrest. 

The arrest of the wealthy restaurateur 
at this time is the result of a suit charg- 
ing false arrest and imprisonment and 
in -which she asks for $100,000, filed by 
Miss' Emory in the Supreme Court, at 
Newark, , through - her attorney, Harry 
Green. - - 

In her complaint, the 1 motion picture 
actress, who is married and suing under 

her real name of Bay Lusardi, alleges 
that on May 6 of this year, the defendant 
swore to a complaint here in the Jefferson 
Market Court before Magistrate Groehl, 
in which she was accused of having forged 
Collis's name to two shares of stock of 
the corporation organized to exploit her 
in motion pictures. She was arrested that 
same day in front of the Hotel Astor, 
where she was living at the .time, and 
arraigned before Magistrate Groehl on a 
charge of forgery. The Magistrate fixed 
bail in the sum of $5,000, in default of 
which she remained in the Jefferson Mar- 
ket jail for four days. 
■ At the end of- that time, her bail hav- 
ing been reduced to $2,500, she was re- 
leased on a bond furnished by the Na- 
tional: ' Surety Company. Subsequently, 
she was discharged by Magistrate Groehl 
because the evidence was insufficient to 
sustain the charge against her. 
■ . She also avers that, as the result : of 
her arrest and incarceration, she is in a 
nervous condition and her health has been 
affected. 

- Israel Brinkman, who is Collis's attor- 
ney in the suit, has filed no answer as 
yet, but, in the one he is preparing, he 
says that the defendant wfll set up an 
affirmative defense in which' will be set 
forth that Miss Emory failed to- account 
for all of the $16,000 which it was al- 
leged in the Police Court the restaurateur 
had turned over to her at the time the film 
corporation was organised. At that time 
it was also alleged that Miss Emory had 
spent almost $6,000 in a short time, en- 
tertaining her friends with wine suppers. 
Another element in the case that was 
brought out at the trial in the Police 
Court is that Miss Emory had a contract 
'with the Ray Emory Productions, Inc., 
that being the name of the film company 
organized, by the terms of which she was 
to be featured in pictures for ten years at 
a weekly salary of $125. 



KANE SUED FOR DIVORCE 

. . . . * . , It- ^ ••^~ ~-^< *- : -v v 

Abraham Goldman, who /works under, 
the name of Kane in the act^of Bane and! 
Herman, was! served with a summons and 
complaint last 'week in an action for di- 
vorce brought by Maud Goldman through 
Harry Saks .Hechheimer. .The couple 
were married in April,' 1814, in Edmonton, 
Canada. -..-_--• -'' 

In her complaint Mrs. Goldman accuses 
her husband ..of, having beaten and abused 

- her until she could no longer., stand' it. 
Beginning with the "date -of -their marriage 
she states that she traveled with him. and 
was nappy, until May, 1916, when Kane 
formed the acquaintanceship of Herman 

- and seemed to prefer his company to being 
with her, both on and off stage. Shortly 
afterward, she alleges, he began to strike 
and kick her to the' accompaniment' of vile 
names. - While thus engaged upon one oc- 
casion, ahe alleged, he fractured a bone in 
her face and blackened her eye so thor- 
oughly that it remained in that condition 
for three months. 

In July^ 1917, she' went home to her 
parents in '" Brooklyn," she 'charges,'' taking 
the . two children which had been born to 
them with her, but,' after remaining there 
several, months, returned .to Kane, . who 
was at that time employed by' the Broad- 
_ way Music Corp.", upon the promise that he 
would treat her better." It was not long, 
though, before he began to mistreat; her 
«r'* n i ahe maintain,,, setting forth in her 
papers that, after being away for a day 
pr two he would come home and, after 
dragging her from .bed, throw her against 
the wall and furniture of their apartment 
until other folk came to her assistance. 

.That Kane was also unmindful of his 
marriage tows is alleged in'a part of the 
affidavit where his wife states that, in 
1917, she discovered he had lived with a 
woman named Demoine, at the Lotty 
Hotel, Evans vflle, M-, where, the papers 
state, he registered as "Eddie. Kane and 
wife." Another woman, this one in Cleve- 
land, also received attention from him, the 
papers set forth, the occurrence, taking 
place only last February. While playing 
in Philadelphia he sent her $60, the wife 
swears, to have her come to Baltimore, 
where, she charges, they registered at the 
same hotel. 

- Also, last May, the wife heard that Kane 
was in the apartment of a woman in the 
Algernon Apartments at Seventh avenue 
and Fifty-fourth street, where, ahe says, 
she was told that he was preparing to stay 
afl night. So, wanting to make sure, she 
went to the place, but was refused admit- 
tance. Then she caned the apartment on 
the 'phone and, she alleges, he was forced 
to escape by going down the dumb-waiter 
and crawling out through a coal hole to 
the street. When he came home he car- 
ried his underwear in his coat pocket, she 

states. 

Characterizing her husband as a "woman- 
fighter instead of a man-fighter," the wife 
charges that he recently threw a rock at 
her which injured her hand so severely that 
she had to have four stitches taken in it. 

The papers further state that Kane is 
goin g aw ay with a burlesque show called 
the "High Rollers," and $50 weekly is 
asked as alimony for the maintenance of 
the wife and two children, Betty and May. 

Acting under advice of her attorney, the 
wife last week went to the apartment oc- 
cupied by the Kanea at 318 West Fifty- 
first street and removed afl the furniture. 
. The act of Kane and Herman is known 
as .'The Midnight Sons," and the wife, in 
describing it and her husband, states : 

"My husband has been an incessant 
drinker ever since the year 1915; in fact, 
the act in which he and Herman work is 
designated as The midnight Sons,' and the 
whole performance is taken up with the 
portrayal of two drunken bums coming 
home at an impossible hour of the morning, 
and there is no doubt that realism has been 
brought into his part of the performance 
by reason of his continued and never dis- 
continued drunken condition." 



BOSTON 



ALSO 



\ . Boston, Mass:; Aug. 14.— "Buddies," the 
Selwyn and Company musical comedy 
which opened 'here last 'night, went over 
• big. The play, in three acts and an 
.--epilogue, was written by George V. Ho- 
bart and Mellville Gideon. B. C Hifliam 
supplied 'the music. -.'"'.- ..-■' 

Thepplay deals with France and soldiers, 
but, strange to relate, neither the art of 
France nor the rumble of war are once 
portrayed in the play. It deals with the 
loves of some of our doughboys and their 
Normandy sweethearts. There is, of 
course, the usual intrigue and the "old 
sweetheart," but the play, nevertheless, is 
unusual in its way. ' , 

The music is captivating and -the songs 
are 'of the kind that are remembered. and 
sung in after years.. -_■ ^-.>, •; 

Peggy Woods, as. the heroine, and Don- 
ald Brian and' Wallace Eddiriger, as the 
heroes, were splendid.. . , .■ 

One "of "the "outstanding features was 
PeggjrV'Woioa'e ""Fairy. Tale" song, which 
held up the show and obliged her to take 
numerous encores.; '"Buddies" has only one 
fault, and that is 'the overact ion of the 
letter episode* in : the first act, which 
smacks strongly .of .'The Better Ole." 
Otherwise, .it .is. the theatrical surprise of 
the 'season, ' and • is aure to -find' success 
waiting for it. It is the strongest kind 
of an argument against the claim that you 
cannot have a musical comedy without 
bedroom scenes and lingerie. •..' - 

In the cast are Wallace Eddinger, Don- 
ald Brian, Peggy Wood, Mme. Dalberg, 
John Wflliard, Edooard Durand and Eddie 
Brown, besides several smaller part people. 



FRANKIE RICE SUES BERNSTEIN 

Frankie Bice, the impersonating' come- 
dienne, sued Sam Bernstein, th» booking 
agent, and obtained a judgment against 
nun last week, amounting to $223.02. 

In her complaint, filed by Louis Lichten- 
berg, her attorney, Miss Rice alleged that 
she- loaned Bernstein $180 in cash while 
they were both in Syracuse, N. Y., where 
she was playing December 14, 1916. Bern- 
stein, who at the time was acting in a 
fsort of managerial capacity for Miss 
Bice, gave her an I. O. U. and. a note 
payable in thirty days as security for the 
loan. 

However, she claimed that Bernstein 
failed to pay the money he borrowed from 
her in 1916, her claim resulting in the 
judgment for $223.02, which includes in- 
terest and costs. 



LUBOWSKA WINS CASE 
Prof. Alverna last week lost his case 
against Madame Lubowska, the Russian 
danseuse, in which he sued for $300 due 
him, he claims, for four weeks rehearsals 
of her company, prior to its South Ameri- 
can tour. M. Strassmann, attorney for 
, Lubowska proved that the professor was 
to be paid only -from the tune the com- 
pany played the South American tour. 



BLANEYS NAME PLAY 

The name of the production which the 
Blaneys are to put on Broadway this sea- 
son is The Unwanted One," by Forrest 
a. Isey and Clara Beranger. It is an 
oriental play. 



SHEA HOUSE OPENINGS SET 
The foUowing houses, booked by Feiber 
and Shea, and closed for the Summer, wfll 
reopen for the fall season,: The Bayonne 
Opera House, August 25; Bijou, Orange, N. 
J., September 1- The Jefferson, Auburn, 
N. Y., September 8, and Colonial, Akron, 
Ohio, September 22. 



HILL NAMES CARTOON SHOW 

The title of the new Gus Hill Cartoon 
show wfll be "Keeping Up With the 
Joneses," taken from Pop's cartoons in the 
Globe and other papers. Joe Herbert is 
working on the book and Hill expects to 
hare the production ready shortly. 



GETS ENTIRE LOEW TIME 
Dick Mack, formerly of Jennings and 
Mack, opened but week on the Loew 
time with a new blackface act written by 
himself. He has been booked to play the 
entire Loew circuit, Charles Fitzpatrick 
is handling it. 

SPIEGEL SHOW- OPENS AUG. 28 

"Kiss Me Again," a new Max Spiegel 
show, wfll open at Harrisburg on August 
28th. 



August 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS END 
OVERSE AS THEATR ICAL WORK 

Minstrel Show Came Back Last Week, After Giving 500 

Performances— Society Spent About $150,000 in 

Entertaining Fighters "Over There." 



GATTS HAS HEW SHOW 

George Gatts ia organ i zing two. compa- 
nies to present "The Revelations of a 
Wife" on the road. Toe story of the play, 
by Grace Haywood, has ran in serial form 
in a number of newspapers. 

The Eastern company, which opens at 
Pottsville. Pa., on Aug. 21, Includes Larry 
Brooks, Albert West, Mary Keogh, Gene- 
vieve Williams, Richard Made,. Fred Wal- 
ton and Ed Everett. 

A Western company, opening in Peoria 
on Aug. 31, is being organized in Chicago. 



With the arrival early this week from 
Europe of the . five'.' Remaining girls 'who 
uere part of llu" iiini iifinTasTi li'iiiiiiiiii in 
the "Knights of Columbus Troubadours," 
the ' overseas theatrical activities . of the 
K. of C have ceased. " r . 

Last week, all. of the forty men in the 
company of K. of C. entertainers that pre- 
sented' a minstrel show came back from 
Europe. And while the theatrical, activ- 
■ ities of the K. of C. were not as extensive 
as those of the Y. M. C. A., some idea of 
the value of the entertainment work they 
did may be gleaned from the fact that the 
"Troubadours" and the minstrel show gave 
. a total of 500 performances throughout the 
war regions of Europe, playing to more 
than 2,tXK>,000 men. 

The fit. of C. began their theatrical 
activities here in November, 1917, starting 
with about fifty men who played in and 
arranged performances at the . various 
camps. Previous to that occasional per- 
formances had been arranged by members 
of the organization at camps here and 
there, with such well known performers as 
Lillian Russell, Raymond Hitchcock and 
James K. Hackett taking part. At that 
time James TV. Fitz Patrick, former head 
of the Wihte Rats, and now an official of 
the four. A's, was active in K. C. theatrical 
affairs. Raymond Hitchcock and James 
' K. Hackett also were actively identified 
with the K. of.C.'s stage affairs in those 
early days. And in June, 1917, Thomas 
Egan, the tenor, presented a grand opera 
at the Pelham Naval Training Station, thus 
establishing a unique precedent for an 



army* or naval camp. As it afterward de- 
veloped, this was the only camp in this 
country which ever had a grand opera 'per- 
formance presented within its precincts. 

' Gradually and without • ostentation, the 
organization - increased the number of per- 
former-workers until, by March, 1918, they 
totaled 500 men., Then the K. of C. ex- 
tended its theatrical activities, sending per- 
formers to Europe, -who gave shows there. 
The organization also arranged and 
financed two shows that played through- 
out Europe, the personnel of each cast 
being made-up of soldiers who had seen 
active service overseas. One show was a 
minstrel and the other was a musical pro- 
duction called "A Buck on Leave." The 
Casino Theatre in Paris was rented by 
the K. of O, and each of these shotts was 
presented there, running several weeks to 
flourishing business. 

In addition to this, the K. of C. bought 
sheet music in this country from' almost 
all of the well known publishers and dis- 
tributed more than 3,000,000 copies among 
the armed forces of the United States here 
and abroad. ' For this item alone the organ- 
ization expended approximately $10,000, in 
addition to obtaining much free music. 

In the statement issued by the K. of C. 
early this week, giving a detailed account 
of how $18,900,703 of the organization's 
money was spent in -war work, there is 
an item of $438,438.19 which went for 
"Athletics, social and moving picture enter- 
tainments, etc," part of which, unofficially 

figured at $150,000, was spent in its the- 
atrical activities. 



t MONTGOMERY LEFT $4,630 

The value of the property left by Dave 
Montgomery, 'comedian and former part- 
ner of Fred Stone, is placed at $4,620 by 
an accounting 1 which his sister, Mrs. Law- 
head, has filed. 

This consists of jewelry, valued at 
$287.50; wearing apparel and trunks, at 
$123; an insurance policy on the Equitable 
Life for $4,181.91, and deposits, in the 
Mutual Bank of $31.72. Montgomery also 
owned a house at 126 West Seventy-first 
Street, which was -mortgaged for its value, 
$25,000, so that there is no equity. 

Several : stocks were placed as of no. 
equity, and include 400 shares of the Blau- 
bas Company of Cuba, 500 shares of The 
Meershaum Company of America. Two 
of the four trunks owned by the comedian, 
with their contents, are missing, and a 
claim against the express company has 
been filed. 

The only claim against the estate is a 
bill for $831.50 by Kendell Brothers, tailor- 
ing firm, which Montgomery had pledged 
himself to make good. Montgomery died 
intestate in Chicago, 111:, on April 20th, 
1918, aged forty-seven. Two sisters sur- 
vive him. 



ACTRESS SUES FOR $100,000 
Denver, Colo., Aug. 15. — Mrs. Sohara 
Simpson, who states she is an actress 
end who also claims to have a contract 
with a California producer by which she 
is to become a picture star, is suing J. J. 
Brown, a millionaire mine operator, for 
$100,000 on a breach of promise charge. 
She claims that Brown induced her to give 
up her picture career and become engaged 
to him. She says he lavished presents 
upon her amounting to many thousands of 
dollars. He then broke off the engagement 
without explaining why, she says. 

HAVE PLAY CALLED "THE BELGIAN" 

Ptttsbtjbgh, Pa., Aug. 16. — Doris Mc- 
Keith is to return to the stage in a play 
called "The Belgian," of which Ellis Em- 
mons Reed has the copyright. He will 
stage the play here for three days at Car- 
negie Hall, the proceeds to go to the Boy 
Scouts. He . will probably then send the 
piece on the road. The supporting cast 
includes Teresa McCarthy, Louis De.Valle, 
Ralph S. Toy, George D. Hough,- Charles 
B. Stemmerich and W. J. GonnAiy. 



BREAK GROUND FOR NEW HOUSE 

San Francisco, Aug. 18. — The old 
buildings at Fourth and G streets at Eu- 
reka, CaL, are being wrecked, work hav- 
ing been begun last week, in preparation 
for the construction of the Hippodrome. 
The house will seat 1,200 and. will be added 
to the Ackerman and Harris circuit 



FILMS GET FANCHON & MARCO 

San Francisco, Aug. 17.— Fanchon and 
Marco, who recently appeared in the re- 
vues at the Casino here and are at present 
with Tate's Cabaret, will go into motion 
pictures. They will start at Los Angeles 
on Oct. 1st. 



JAZZ BAND COMING EAST 

San' Francisco, Aug. 18. — Art Hick- 
man's Jazz Orchestra leaves here on Aug. 
24, going direct to New York, where it 
will open for an indefinite period at the 
Biltmore Hotel. 



HILL'S MINSTRELS INCORPORATED 
Aidant, Aug. 16. — On the list of incor- 
porations today is that of the Gus Hill 
Minstrel Company, which is down for $10,- 
000. The address is given as 730 St. 
Nicholas avenue, Manhattan, and the . in- 
corporators are-: G. Hill, E. Prudhon and 
J. J. Sullivan. ' 



MAUD FULTON WRITES NEW PLAY 

San Francisco, Aug. 18. — Maud Ful- 
ton, now here, has jnst completed a play 
which has been forwarded to New York. 



LIKE JOE CAITES PLAY 

DETROIT, Mich., Aug. 14. — "Take It 
from Me" made such a hit here that the 
management was forced to- prolong Its en-, 
gagement a week. 



ZANES VILLE TO HAVE PARK 
Zanesville i Ohio, Aug. 18. — A tract of 
land consisting of forty acres, formerly 
Gant Amusement Park, but which in re- 
cent years has been used as a show ground 
for circuses, carnivals, etc., .will be again 
converted into a resort. The title of the 
property has been acquired by the old 
Citizens' National Bank, which recently 
has given an option to several prominent 
men connected with the American Rolling 
Mills Company of this city. ' Negotiations 
are being conducted by W. R. Barnett. 



"NOTHING BUT LOVE" OPENING 

C. B. Maddock's "Nothing But Love," 
will have its premiere in AUentown, Pa-, 
on August 30, where it will play a matinee 
and evening performance. -From there it 
will travel to the Teck Theatre, Buffalo, 
where it will open on Labor Day. From 
Buffalo, it will be brought to New York. 

The company consists of forty-two peo- 
ple and requires two seventy-foot carloads 
of scenery for the production, together 
with the other effects. 



FIND GRESHAM HAD DRUGS 

Fred Gresham, in private life Fred G res - 
heimer, well known along Broadway 
and former husband of Lillian Lor- 
raine, .was arrested in BeUeyue Hospital 
last week accused of distributing drugs to 
patients of the narcotic ward. He was 
held in $900 bail for trial on. the charge of 
possessing narcotics, illegally. " 

Detectives, notified that Gresham had 
been accused of having narcotics, searched 
his .room at the Hotel Commodore and 
found twenty-five hypodermic needles, 
three syringes, ten vials . full of liquid 
morphine, a box of morphine tubes, a 
package of cocaine and two bottles of 
heroin. 

Gresham recently leaped down a flight of 
stairs and was taken to Bellevue Hos- 
pital and placed in the alcoholic ward. A 
nurse became suspicious and, learning 
that he had used drugs, saw to it that 
Gresham was placed in the narcotic ward. 
Anna Kerr, the supervising nurse there, 
found that he had a large quantity of 
morphine concealed in a handkerchief. 
She charged. 'him with having given the 
drug to patients who had almost ceased 
craving for it. She promptly referred the 
matter to the health department and the 
police. The raid on Greaham's Com- 
modore apartment followed. 

Gresham was convicted some-, time ago 
of having fraudulently obtained money 
from Dr. Karl Muck, for a New York pro- 
German weekly, the Fatherland. He had 
been sought by the District Attorney for 
alleged fraudulent stock transactions re- 
cently, which was the last occasion, on 
which he figured in the news. 



DRAMATISTS TO HAVE OWN HOME 

The Society of American Dramatists 
and Composers is to have their own club- 
house' at 148 West Forty -fifth - Street. 
They have raised a fund of $2^00 which 
has been supplemented by $3,500 from 
George M. Cohan. There will be a loung- 
ing room, writing room and restaurant 
' attached to the place. 



HAVE $l,00O NIGHT 
Paterson, N. J., Aug. 15. — Gus Hill's 
Minstrels played to over $1,000 at Watson's 
Lyceum last night. They are booked for a 
return ' engagement later in the season. 




SELECT MARDI GRAS COMMITTEES 

The following committees have been' 
chosen to look after the Coney Island 
Mardi Gras this year, which is scheduled 
to start on September 15 and end on Sep- 
tember 20: Finance, James C." Porter; 
Floats, Walter Cleary, William C. 
Meinch and William - H. Miller, manager 
of Luna Park; Music, Samuel Gumpertz; 
Electricity, Morris Goldberg; Badges, 
Samuel Weissberger; Decorations, Ed- 
ward C. Tilyou, manager of Steeple- 
chase Park; Comics, Edward Ehrman; 
Permits, Frederick Oppikofer; Parades, 
L. A. Squier and Prizes, Peter Minnekeke. 

The officers of the Coney Island Carnival 
Company are William C Meinch, presi- 
dent; James H. Porter, vice-president; U 
A. Squier. secretary; Walter Cleary, treas- 
urer; and the board of directors is' com- 
prised of the following: William SeQeek, 
William C. Meinch, Dr. P. I. Nash, Fred 
W. Kister, Edward Ehrman, William Fox, 
Walter Cleary, Peter Minnekeke, James H. 
Porter, Samuel B. Weissberger, Samuel 
Gumpertz, Edward Stratton, John Kava- 
kos and John W. Wendelken. 



HARRY PARKER DOING SHOW 

A company to present "The Naughty 
Wife," on the road, which the Selwyna 
produced some years ago, has been formed 
and is now rehearsing. It will open Aug- 
ust 25 at Norfolk, Va., and will play the 
south.- The play is being produced under 
Henry Keen's direction and is managed by 
Harry Dole Parker. The following are in- 
cluded in the cast: Reva Greenwood, Mr. 
and Mrs. Eldrid, A. Farber, Henry Keen, 
Walter Crossby, Arthur Blake and others. 
Keen is the stage director, 

"IN OLD KENTUCKY" OPENS AGAIN 

"In Old Kentucky." the old melodrama, 
bad its premiere on Thursday in Hoopeatoo, 
III. This is the twenty-seventh premiere 
the play bas had. It is now being produced 
by "Musty" Miller and George W. Sammis. 

With the company are the usual Pick- 
aninnies and Queen Bess, a horse that has 
appeared in the play for the last six 
seasons. 



KATHRYN LEE 

One of the Concert Field's Moat Talented 
Siog-ers. 



PICKS PLAY FOR MAE MURRAY 

Mae Murray, the original Brinkley girl, 
who made such a hit in "The Follies," 
and several subsequent Broadway produc- 
tions, and who of -late baa been devoting 
her time to films, baa signed a long term 
contract with Sain Shannon, who has se- 
cured "Marigold'* as original comedy by 
Edgar All en Wolf, with music by Albert 
Von TiUer, aa her first play. 



THE I*lv W TOR K^CM P PER 



August 20, 1919 



TICKET BROKERS HIT HARD 

WITH ALL BIG SHOWS CLOSED 



Badness at Various Agencies Has Dropped Off 90%, 
Patrons of Dealers Only Want Seats 
at die Successes. 



for 



With but nine allows running of the 
twenty-five scheduled for the Broadway 
houses at this time of the season, the bus- 
in era of ticket brokers has dropped 90 per 
cent. This is ' frankly admitted by. the 
larger broken around the Bialto and will 
come nearer than any ordinance has ever 
done to putting them out of business, if the 
strike lasts long enough. 

The situation caused by the actors' strike 
•a regards the ticket broken here is un- 
precedented and strange from more than 
one angle. To begin with, the plays that 
have coma In and those that have been 
fortunate enough to continue running, are 
playing to capacity business. But this does 
not seem' to be- helping the ticket brokers' 
business. For their business depended 
largely on the sale of tickets for musical 
shows that were established successes like 
the Ziegfeld "Follies," Bhubert "Gaieties,'' 
and several of the dramatic successes such 
as "East is West" and "Lixhtnin'," all of 
which have been forced to close daring the 
strike. 

A larger number of tickets were handled 
by the brokers for the shows mentioned 
than for any other group of shows. And 
the real "pickin's" of the brokers' business 
was realised from the sale of tickets for 
the shows enumerated. Host of them 



rarely sold a ticket for the "Follies," for 
example, for an excess price that was any- 
where near the fifty cents advance fixed by 
law. The prices ranged anywhere from $2 
to $10 in excess of the box office price 
stamped on each ticket. 

One prominent broker declared last week 
that the strike situation had already cost 
him more than $8,000, and that if the strike 
continued many weeks longer several of 
the larger agencies would bare to give np 
some of the expensive premises they now 
lease and occupy for the purpose of con- 
ducting their business. However, this sit- 
uation does not affect the "digger" class 
of brokers, who operate in hallways and 
around theatres without a city license and 
who deal only in tickets for the show that 
they happen to be hanging around. 
. Then, too, the brokers say that the strike 
has had a detrimental effect on the desire 
of the theatregoing public to patronise 
shows. People, even those that are abso- 
lutely neutral in the matter, seem to feel 
that this is no time for theatregoing* The 
result is, the brokers claim, the shows now 
running that are playing to capacity— and 
most of them are — are drawing their pat- 
ronage from the hordes of out of town 
vacationists who are to be found in New 
York at this time of year. 



COOP AMD LENTS CIRCUS QUITS 

Sx. JoHiWBtnsr, Vt, Aug. 16.— The Ooop 
and Lent shows, which played here re- 
cently, are to be sold at public auction on 
Aug. 32 to satisfy creditors. When" the 
show reached this town it was attached 
for $2,000 by J. Bolfe Searls, attorney 
for Carrie A. Bennett, of Oonway, N. H., 
who had received a judgment against the 
company for injuries sustained when a tier 
of seats collapsed. The show tried to make 
good the claim from the receipts at the next 
two stands, bnt business waa so poor that 
the performers were not paid, and so they 
quit the show. The show then collapsed 
and the owners left for New York. The 
property consists of a one-ring circus and 
six aide shows and animal attractions. 

RE-BUILD BURNED HOUSE 

Alabart, Ga* Aug. 16. — The Bawlins 
Opera House, this city, which was de- 
stroyed by fire eighteen months ago, has 
been rebuilt and is now open for business. 
It is known as the liberty Theatre. It 
cost $100,00 to reconstruct and now seats 
3,000 people. 'Gortatowsky Brothers are 
running the theatre with high class vaude- 
ville and pictures. ' ^ 

ABINGDON ESTATE SETTLED 

Bijou Fernandez was last week dis- 
charged from the administration of the 
estate of her husband, the late William 
It. Abingdon, who died intestate. In the 
accounting which she filed, she charged 
herself with $791.91 and showed expendi- 
tures of $482.66 for funeral and other ex- 
penses, which brought her expenditures up 
to $806.32. 

NORMA TALMADGE 

7orm» Talmadge, the motion . picture 
star, whose picture is on the front cover 
of this week's CLIPPER, is at present 
doing some of her finest work for the 
screen. 

The photograph reproduced on the cover 
is one of her best and is a copyright from 
the Lumiere studios. 



RITA OLCOTT TO PRODUCE 

Mrs. Chauncey Olcott has written a 
play in conjunction with Grace Heyer 
called "Ljwmore." Mrs. Olcott will pro- 
duce the piece independently. 



NAZZARO LOSES AGAIN 

Nat Nasarro, whose business is book- 
ing acts in vaudeville when he isn't busy 
in court, last several more decisions last 
week. 

The bill of complaint in the suit that 
Nasarro brought in Boston against his 
wife, the Keith Theatre and the Jass band 
act headed by Nat Jr., was di s mi s s e d last 
week on motion of Conine, Collins and 
Hart, the attorneys' who represent the 
Keith i n t e res ts in Boston. As a result, 
the boy's earnings . from bis recent Keith 
engagement in. Boston, which the foster 
father had tied up claiming that the boy's 
earnings belonged to him, were turned over 
to Mrs. Nasarro by the Keith Theatre. 

Here, in our own Supreme Court, last 
Friday, Judge Lydon, sitting in Special 
Term, for Motions, permitted Anton Siegel, 
Nasarro's. attorney, to withdraw a motion 
made by Nasarro to acquire the custody 
of Nat Jr., H. J. and F. EL Goldsmith, 
attorneys for Mrs. Nasarro, consented to 
the withdrawal. It .was .stated in court 
that Nasarro was too busy to come here 
from Philadelphia, where he went on busi- 
ness, to appear before Judge ■ Ly don. ■ 

Previously, Nasarro had obtained a writ 
of habeas corpus from Judge HotehHss 
in which Mrs. Nasarro was directed to 
produce Nat Jr. In the Supreme Court. 
The foster father claimed that his wife 
had alienated the boy's affectiona and was 
keeping him away. The writ was dis- 
missed. 

Even before that Nasarro had obtained 
a writ of habeas corpus directing his wife 
to produce their three-year-old daughter, 
Dorothy, whom it was claimed the mother 
sent to Kansas City so that she should 
be away from the father. This writ, too, 
was dismissed. 

Then Nasarro made a motion. to compel 
his wife to bring their daughter from 
Kansas City into the jurisdiction of the 
Supreme Court here. This - motion was 
denied by Judge Lace but week. . 
■ It may also be mentioned in passing 
that several motions have been made in 
the divorce suit brought by Mrs. Nasarro, 
the most important one being the one made 
by the alleged co-respondent asking for 
an early trial. Motion denied, spake the 
judge. 



i 1 



JUMPS TO DEATH .T r-'.'.l \ 

diaries H. Weston,' stage manager at 
one time for Maude Adams, but now a 
drug addiot, last week ended his -life by 
leaping off the Aeolian Building. Many: 
will remember him as being in "Peter Pan 1 ' 
in 1906. 

Weston, in 1914, 'owned a large motion 
picture studio in London.- He was making 
a war picture when he suddenly fell out of 
an aeroplane 160 feet. While the fall did 
not kill him, it resulted in his breaking 
his arms, legs and nose. It was necessary 
to give him morphine for weeks to relieve 
him of the pain, and when he got out of 
the hospital, he had unwillingly become an 
addict to- the drug. 

Weston carried a license to use drugs, 
given him by the Department of Health. 
He had tried to break himself' of- the habit 
at many hospitals. 

In jumping from the. Aeolian Building, 
Weston did not strike the street, but fell 
on the roof of the neighboring four-story 
building. In his pocket was a letter, writ- 
ten before his death and letters indicating 
that. he had only, last week applied to 
George M. Cohan for a role', in one of bis 
shows, but had been notified that there 
waa no vacancy. The letter in his pocket 
read: . 

"How one feels Just before death by 
umping from the eighteenth story of a 
>uOding — by Charles H. Weston, just be- 
fore jumping from the eighteenth floor." 

Below the heading was this sentence: 

"If any newspaper uses this short story, 
please send my wife, who is Mrs. C. H. 
Weston, No. 362 South 11th Street, New- 
ark, N. J-, a check for $26. I take this 
advantage, because to die is a big ad- 
venture." 

The letter itself said: 

"Last night. I saw my wife and darling 
son the last time on this earth. It in 
a strange- feeling to know that it ia the 
last time. Something in your soul Beems 
to cry, 'How wonderful that last kiss is I' 
What a coward I feell Still, I know I am 
not a coward. It is far better to die at 
once than a lingering death hi an insane 
hospital, as I know fun crazy. ■ . 

"I find myself in the most unknown 
places to me. I cannot sleep without the 
most hideous dreams. I am always talk- 
ing to myself, always doing the most un- 
earthly things. 

"They will be far better off without me. 
I cannot find employment. I am unable 
to keep them. I am dragging them down. 
I cannot live and let it be known that I 
am tike cause of their downfall. All this 
comes to my mind as I am waiting to 
jump. People are passing far below. I do 
not want to fall on any one. I am crying 
like a child. My heart and head ache. Yet 
I am not nervous. I started to jump a few 
seconds ago, but a vision of my dear, dead 
mother came before me' just as plain as 

day- 

■ 'Say your last prayer— the one I gave 
you years ago.' I am praying now. I pray 
God to keep ' my wife, who is the finest 
woman on earth; my boy, who is my 
heart's dream. I pray God to keep them 
from sorrow and darkness. Oh, God! 
How I love them! My dear wife will give 
any one who is interested the most amaz- 
ing history of me that one could hear. 

"Billions of thoughts pass through my 
brain. What will I see in five minutes? 
Will I go to another world? Will my soul 
rest in peace t Five minutes from now 
will I know what dying is? I have no 
more fear of hell. I cannot suffer any 
more than I have. My body is in hell. If 
I am to go to hell, only my soul can go, 
but I cannot save my soul. 

"I feel just like a man waiting to meet 
his boss when there is something wrong. 
Goodby all. May God bless you. If any 
paper uses this, please send a few dollars 
to my wife and son." 



NEW THEATRE BONDS DUE 

Philip J. Sinnott, the referee appointed 
by the Supreme Court to compute the 
amount due to the Equitable Trust Com- 
pany, as trustee for the bondholders of 
the New Theatre (the Century), filed a 
report last week in which he said. $1 ,750,- 
000 was due as principal and $81 ,16655 as 
interest ..;.... ,:, . v.'.. 

"-.'•■'' ''•: • ■ •". ■ '" *""': 



f . \ i 

"7 Miles to Arden"^Moro9Cq, opens Grand 

Raplas, Mich.' Aug. 21; Little Theatre, 
. N. X„ Oct. 1. . .. . . . ,. . 

"Look Who's Hero" — Max Spiegel, opens 

Washington, Aug. 24. f 
"Mme. Sappho" — Oliver Morosco. opens 

Olympic Theatre, Chicago, Aug. 24. 
"The Bashful Hero" — A. H. Woods, opens 

Bijou Theatre, Aug. 25. '. i ^TV . <~ 
"First Is Last"— Wm. Harris,: opens Ma'x- 

ine Elliott Theatre, Aug. 26. " 
"Little Love Birds' —A. H. Woods, opens 

Atlantic City, Aug. 26. 
"What's the Xdea? ,T — P. 7. Peterson, opens 

Schenectady, Aug. 25. 
"Just a Minute"— John Cort, opens Atlantic 

City, Aug. 26. . [i 

"Lady Tony" — A. H. Woods, i opens Stam- 
ford. Conn., Aug. 29. 
Strand, Brooklyn, opens Aug. 80. 
Barney Fagan Benefit — Manhattan Opera 

House, Aug. 81. 
"Fifty-Fifty"— Sclbllla Theatrical Co.. opens 

Washington, Aug. 81. 
"Luatoore" — Rita Alcott, opens Henry MlUer 

Theatre, Sept L • 
"The Girl In the Limousine"— A. H. Woods, 

opens Eitinge Theatre, Sept. 1. 
"Nothing But Love"— Chas. Maddock, opens 

Buffalo, Sept 1. 
"My Lady Friends"— H. H. Prasee, opens 

Pittsburgh, Labor Day. 
"Double Harness" — Joe Klaw, opens Stam- 
ford. Sept. 6. 
Friara' Special Meeting — Sept. 8. 
"The Girl in the Stag* Box"— A. H. Woods. 

opens Washington, Sept 7. 
"The Little Blue Devil" — Joe Weber, opens 

Detroit, Sept 7. • 

"Mommer" — Stelwyn and Company, opens, 

Anbury Park. Sept 8. ^^ ^^ 

"What's the Odds?" — Sam Shannon, opens at 

Baltimore, Sept 8. 
"The Great Illusion" — A. H. Woods, opens 

Booth Theatre, Sept 8. 
"Boly Poly Eyes" — John Cort, opens Balti- 
more, Sept 8. 
"The Little Whooper" — Abe Levy, opens 

Atlantic City, Sept 16. 
Mardi aras— Opens Coney Island, Sept 16. 
Bobert MantaU opens In "Jullm Caesar" at 

the Montana, Brooklyn. 
Sothern and Marlowe open In . "Twelfth 

Night." at 44th Street Theatre, Oct 6. 
"The Luck of the Navy" — Comstock and 

Geat, opens Manhattan Opera House, 

Oct 6. 
"The Unknown Woman" — A." B. Woods, 

opens Washington, Oct 6. 
Society of American Singers, William Wade 

Hlnsbaw, opens Park Theatre, Oct. 13. 
Star .Opera Co.. opens Lexington Ttieetre, 

Oct. 207 '• 
Provlncetown Players, open Oct .81. 
"Aphrodite" — Comstock and Gest. opens 

Century Theatre, Nov. 1.' 
Chicago Opera Company, opens Chicago, 

Nov. 18. 



"BOYS WILL BE, BOYS" OPENS 

Balthcoke, Md, Aug. 18. — The theatre 
season was opened tonight at Ford's Opera 
House with "Boys Will Be Boys'' pre- 
sented by Joe Hart, of New York 

It was the first performance of the play 
on any stage and won a warm welcome 
that was well deserved, for "Boys Will Be 
Boys" is human and humorous, .has here 
and there a tear, followed by many laughs 
and presents in flesh and blood "Peep 
CTDay," that Irvin Cobb creation which 
emodies all the yearnings of youth. And 
also Judge Priest with his grandiloquent 
manner, his chin whiskers and linen suit, 
bis palm leaf fan, his little, round stomach 
and. short legs. Of course, he,' has 
Jeff Pqindexter, black as tar, bringing ia 
the., rear. "','' ' . ". 

Harry Beresford is an' artist in his 
drawing of "Peep O'Day." His technique 
is finished, which means that it is entirely 
concealed, and one sees only the simple, 
manly, lowly soul, with the keen wit and 
poignant .wisdom of one of the most na- 
tural characters ever created. All this is 
suggested in Mr. Beresford'e portrayal of 
"Peep," a sincere portrayal covered 
skillfully with a delicious . drollery. 
William St. James' study of Judge Priest 
ia a mature, mellow, sympathetic piece of 
work, not so live perhaps as "Peep," but 
very picturesque, and there are several 
more excellent character studies. Black 
Jeff Poindexter played by. Frank I. Frayne; 
the Manhunting Widow, handled very well 
by Janet Morehouse, and Nick Bell, the 
oldest inhabitant, of whom Claude Cooper 
made a most amusing sketch. 

NEW FIRM LOCATED 

Dodge and Pogany, the new theatrical 
producing firm, opened their new offices 
last week on the top floor of the Lyric 
Theatre building. Wendell Phillips Dodge, 
formerly of the executive staff of David 
Belasco and Willy Pogany, the artist and 
scenery and costume designer, constitute 
the firm, -which is not a member of the 
United Pro3ucing Managers' Association, 



Aagttst 20, 1919 



THE N 1§W ; Y OR K CLIPPER 




ENGLISH ACTS 

ASK MUCH TO 

COME TO U.S. 

WANT PROHIBITIVE SALARIES 



English vaudeville performers and acts 
are demanding prohibitive sums for ap- 
pearing in America, according to Al Lnwis, 
of Lewis and Gordon, who returned from 
Europe last Sunday on La France, after 
upending four weeks in London and Paris 
in search of acts, performers and vaude- 
ville material for exploitation in this 
country. 

The reason they are demanding such 
rami, Lewis explained, is because they are 
under the impression that vaudeville busi- 
ness in this country at the present time 
is proving a veritable bonanta for the 
managers. Therefore, they feel that they 
should share largely 'in the untold profits 
that they are convinced vaudeville in- 
terests are garnering. 

Then, too, performers and acts that are 
desirable for this country are generally 
favorites in their native country, Where 
the custom is still prevalent of singing up 
for periods that run as long as five years. 
Under the terms of such lengthy .con- 
tracts, performers and acta may continue 
to use the same material during the en- 
tire term. The result is that they do not 
have to Lather their heads each season for 
new material, as is the custom in this 
country, which gives them a certain ease 
of mind that they feel they could not 
attain hero. 

The matter of traveling is also a factor 
in their reluctance to leave their native 
heath. For no great distances separate 
the principal cities in England,' the farth- 
est point from London being but seven 
hundred miles, whereas in this country 
they could travel 3,000 miles from New 
York in one direction before touching the 
Pacific coast. 

Lewis also declared that vaudeville busi- 
ness in London is not now what it was. 
Many of, the variety houses,' especially 
in the West End district, are changing 
their policy and are now either showing 
motion pictures or playing musical re- 
vues. 

Tn Paris, Lewis says, he found the vari- 
ety houses thriving as never before. There 
has been, a decided drop in patronage at 
the Jthentre« 'where musical ; or dramatic 
attractions are" playing ; while', on the'other 
hand, the two theatres that are. 'doing 
the biggest^ business at present arc 1 the 
Alhambra and Olympia, both . running 
vaudeville shown. -'';."." ~. 

Besides' being appointed American agent 
for various English and French acts and 
performers, Lewis says he also brought 
back with him the producing rights of 
eight Anglo-French playlets, several of 
which have been presented at the Grand 
Guignol in Paris. He plans to produce all 
of them In vaudeville here within the next 
six months. ' < 



BUCKNER Of BELLEVUE AGAIN 

It was intimated last week in 'the office 
of Assistant District Attorney Peter B. 
Olney, Jr., now on his vacation, that the 
indictment he obtained in . the United 
States District Court against Arthur 
Buckner, the booking agent, might be dis- 
missed. ' ■»./: .' .' . ■ 

The indictment followed Buckner's re- 
cent partnership deals in the vaudeville 
booking business, in which he sold more 
proportionate interests to people than 
could possibly be acquired, and charges him 
with using the malls to defraud. 

At the present time, Buckner's sanity is 
under observation in the psycopathio ward 
of Bellevue Hospital, where he. was sent 
last week. Before that, following his in- 
dictment, several months 'ago, he was sent 
to the hospital for the insane on Ward's 
Island. After spending? a f*w weeks there, 
Buckner was released and sent home to his 
, family, the Federal authorities claiming 
that they knew nothing of the manner 
through which he had affected his release. 
No order for his release had been sent to 
the hospital by the Federal Court. At 
the hospital it was said that his commit- 
ment papers failed to state that he was 
under indictment in the Federal Court, so, 
when it was decided by the doctors that 
his confinement in the hospital was no 
longer' necessary, they released him with- 
out taking cognizance of the indictment. 

The Federal authorities would not have 
known yet that Buckner had been re- 
leased from the hospital to which he had 
been committed had not acquaintances 
reported seeing him about Broadway to 
the TJ. S. District Attorney's office. 

After learning that Buckner was out, 
Assistant District Attorney Olney ordered 
him taken into custody again. Now, it is 
said that Buckner will probably be lent 
to a private sanitarium, his .wife and 
family, through their attorneys, Yankauer 
A Davidson, having convinced the Federal 
authorities that it will be for the good 
of his welfare. 

It is now felt by friends of Buckner 
that the acts several years ago which led 
to his conviction in the Federal Court on 
a charge of using the mails to defraud 
and for. which he served a term in the 
, Federal prison in Atlanta, Ga., were the 
result of his weakened mental condition, 
which was not taken into consideration 
at the time. 



KESSLER OPENS NEW ACT 

Aaron Keaeler la tuning up a new act 
called "Jazzmaniaca." The offering opened 
at Port Richmond, Staten- Island, last 
Monday with the following cast: Edith 
Donin, Marie Kennedy, George Kennedy, 
Joe Randolph, George Klein, Arthur Her- 
man, Herman Levy and Stanley Skolly. 
The turn, after playing a few out of town 
dates, will come to New York. 



WRITE THREE ACT COMEDY 

Al' Lewis, of Lewis and Gordon and Ben 
Harrison Orkow, have written a new. play 
called "Love and Company," which is sche- 
duled for: production by them late in the 
Fall. It is a comedy In three acts and an 
epilogue. 



MAXWELL STARTS NEW BUSINESS 

Joe. Maxwell has opened offices and will 
head a hew business which will handle the 
stage affairs, of artists in every branch of 
the theatrical" profession, 
..Acts will he 'booked in vaudeville, new 
material selected and put into working 
order for' those desiring a new act, .'and 
after the act has been selected and passed 
upon will be carefully rehearsed and put 
into shape for stage presentation. 

These will be under Mr. Maxwell's per- 
sonal direction, who 'has had a. long and 
varied experience in all lines of theatrical 
work. In the vaudeville field he for years 
headed his own act and afterward owned 
and produced over forty successful acts. 

The motion picture department of the 
business win also be under his personal 
direction, this being a line with which he 
is familiar, having for a considerable 
period been the executive director of the 
Paralta Pictures.' 

Players for the screen will be supplied, 
actors for the legitimate furnished; in 
fact, the business of artists in every line 
of the theatrical profession will be handled 
by Maxwell's new enterprise. Temporary 
offices have been opened at No. S West 
63d street. 



VAUDE ACTS 
QUERIED ON 

STRIKE 

AGENTS QUESTIONING PERFORMERS 



"KITCHEN TO STAGE" READY 

"From the Kitchen to the Stage," a new 
act featuring the Spanish comedienne Rosa 
Torregrosa is ready for presentation. Josa 
8. Call in 1, the French tenor, will be heard 
in the act, which wilt be seen in the local 
houses within the next week or two. 



Many vaudeville agents of big-time acts 
have been rather wary about giving out 
bookings during the past week, it is 
reported, and each contract has been given 
out only after a definite statement from 
the performer that he will fulfill it in 
every particular. Many performers were 
being asked this week if they were willing 
to abide by all the terms of their contract 
and whether they were willing to give 
their promise not to "Jump" a show. 

This precaution on the part of vaude- 
ville agents was said by them to be the 
result of the strike among legitimate 
actors. There has been considerable pres- 
sure brought to bear in Equity circles to 
bring about trouble in the two-a-day, for, 
in some instances, at least, it has been 
vaudeville acts that have been called In 
at the eleventh hour to save one or an- 
other legitimate musical attraction where 
a strike had been called, from closing its 
doors. - 

Vaudeville agents and managers have 
been far-sighted enough to see the possible 
trend of affairs, and the agents are tak- 
ing their present course -as a safeguard. 
It was admitted by big-time vaudeville 
manager that he "was prepared for what- 
ever might suddenly happen." 



LOHMULLER FORMS COMPANY 

The K. and L. Theatrical Enterprises, 
a company which will produce mechan- 
ical devices for vaudeville acts and pro- 
ductions, as weU as take part In various 
other theatrical activities, has been 
formed by B. LohmuUer, Beburta Keen 
aid W. K. Tubman. The firm has been 
incorporated with a capital of $6,000 and 
is at present located in the Putnam 
Building. LohmuUer was formerly asso- 
ciated with George W. Barry, who will 
continue to write acts independently. 



ENGLISH AGENT COMING HERE 

Harry Burns, the English agent, leaves 
London . for' America on August 23, in 
search of -acts, novelties and plays for 
production' in London. - Burns, while 
making the visit, which will be his 'first 
since the war began; will make his head- 
quarters In' the Putnam Building with 
his American representative, J. D. Kims. 



HIPPODROME FOUR TO SPLIT 

The Hippodrome Four • will split up 
their act at the end of the last half 
of this week at the Mt. Vernon Theatre. 
Billy Kelly and Tub Boyd will go back 
to their old girl act. Vic Plant has can- 
celled his burlesque contract and is un- 
decided, as is Jim Baraidi. 



KINGSTON HOUSE OPENS SEPT.. 28 

The Orpheum Theatre, of Kingston, N. 
Y., which has been playing motion pic- 
tures only during the Summer, will re- 
open September 28 with its old policy of 
vaudeville and motion pictures. Walter 
J. Plimmer books the house. 



NEW ACTS 

A new girl act for ten people, four prin- 
cipals and a chorus of six, will shortly be 
put out by the Thor office. Jack McClel- 
lan wrote it. 

Layman and Gurson, two men, one of 
whom is styled the Fatty Arbuckla of 
vaudeville, have- a new act which Dave 
Green is booking. 

"Southern Melodies" ia the name of a 
new song act with three men and one 
woman. It is playing the independent 
bouses, breaking in. 

Olive Le Oompte, formerly of the ParrauV 
Taylor Trio and of Farrell and Le Compte, 
wiU open soon in a new single. She will 
be assisted by a pianist and will use special 
numbers. 

"The Follies of 1917" ia now In produc- 
tion with a cast of eighteen people. The 
act wiU have a novelty setting- on s roof, 
garden, from which aeroplanea win fly 
around the stage and out into the audience. 
Arthur Lyons will handle the act. which 
started rehearsals on Monday at the Har- 
lem Casino. 

Among new acts which are being pre- 
pared by Arthur Lyons are: "I'll Ask 
Yon," "SImpletown," "The Lemon," with 
Herbert Glass, and "The Average Hus- 
band." 

Marty Ward, formerly of Ward and 
Russell, haa been signed to play in a new 
act with Phyliaa York, who haa bean 
brought from the Coast, and will appear 
under the direction of the Ly on s offices. 

Tom Brown is preparing a new act 
called "The County Official*." Six men, 
aU instrumentalists, constitute the com- 
pany. 

"The Tom Brown Highlanders" act. with 
four men and three women, baa been re- 
vived by Tom Brown and opened on Mon- 
day on Western time. 

"The Movie Maids," a girl act with ten 
people, featuring Frank Leab and Sam 
Kessler, went Into rehearsal on Monday. 
Leab and Kessler are producing it. 

Louis and Leona will open Boon with a 
new act with new costumes in addition to 
new material. Paul Dempsey is handling It 

Milt Felber, formerly of Felber and 
Small, with Vera Griffin, formerly of the 
Cafe Boulevard, haa a new piano act. 

Martin Van Bergen, formerly a single, 
wiU shortly do a new act with a pianist 
under the name of Van Bergen and Jose- 
phine. 

Krayona and company have a new draw- 
ing act with three people. 

Rev. Frank Gorman win open on the 
Loew time In New York with a new single. 

La Hoen and Dupreece have a new shoot. 
ing ace. 

Cornelia and ABeUe are playing the 
Loew time In a new act by Allan Spencer 
Tenney. • 

Leonard and Wfilard have been gives 
six weeks' booking on the Keith tims In a 
new act which Allen Spencer Tenney wrote 
for them. It la entitled "Right and Left," 
and carries a special netting " l p"tfT ' H '» f 
the interior of a shoe store. Charles Bler- 
bauer Is hsndling it. 



MOVE INTO SHARP'S OFFICE 
Frank Leab and Sam Kessler are now 
located in the Strand Building. They 
wfll do their producing from the offices 
formerly occupied by Billy Sharp. 

GETS LONG ENGLISH ROUTE 

BUttie Francis haa been, routed until 
1021 In England with her review, "Am- 
bition." 



RETURNING WITH NEW ACT 

Ernest M Jacobs win make his reap- 
pearance In vaudeville shortly in a new 
act to be kn o wn aa Ernest M. Jacobs and 
company, being assisted by Cleo MUler. 
The latter waa until recently a student at 
the New England Conservatory of Monde. 
The title of the act is "SUpping Him 
Thoughts." Bay H. Leason will handle It 



GETS 20 WEEKS' LOEW TIME 

Jimmy Dwyer, formerly of Dwyer and 
May, will start a. twenty- week route over 
the Loew Circuit on Sept. 1, booked by 
Mandel and Rose. He Is recovering from 

an automobile accident. 



ELTTNCE GIVES EXTRA SHOW 

Los Airoxus, CaL, Aug. 16. — Owing to 
the unusual sum— of the Julian Eltinge 
show, here, ha was forced to give an extra 

performance hut Sunday night 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 20, 1919 




PALACE 

Reynolds Donegan Company, with Helen 
and Maudic Reynolds, opened the vaude- 
ville portion and scored a sensational bit 
with one of the best and fastest skating 
DoveltieK of recent time.. Earl Reynolds 
is a master: of the skating art and his as- ' 
Boeiates are marvels on rollers. More costly 
costuming is displayed in this offering than 
many a production can boast of. Whirls 
and spins follow in close succession and the 
finishing trirk. when Reynolds holds one 
of the girls by her ankles, and whirls her 
around several seconds, almost brought the 
audience- to their feet. The act surely de- 
served a more important position, as it is 
beautifully staged and excellently de- 
livered. ' " - .. 

Stanley anil Birnes opened after a short 
wait with a doable number then went into 
•oft shoe dancing that was well received. 
A travesty on an Egyptian dance sent them 
off. to a big band. ■ 

Jason and Haig are a cute pair who offer 
a budget of songs and dances supposedly 
taken from their "Book of Vaudeville." At 
present, the act runs too long and the best 
thing on view was the "Burlesque Opera." 
Not many seasons ago, several acts took 
this idea for their offerings and it must be 
said that this team is on a par with any of 
them. Miss Jason seemed perturbed on 
account of the tempo of the orchestra, but, 
at the finish, the audience applauded 
heartily, showing their sincere appre- 
ciation. 

Morris and Campbell appeared for the 
first time at the' Palace, and if the applanse 
and laughter that greeted them is any cri- 
terion, they should play the house for four 
weeks. This • team knows the wants of 
vaudeville patrons. Joe Morris is a co- 
median who dues not force his comedy and 
is natural in 'everything attempted. Miss 
Campbell is not alone an excellent "feeder" 
but her singing voice and apeparance is all 
that could be desired. • 

Jimmy Hussey and Company is retained 
for the second week and has changed all of 
his songs. A few new gags have also been 
inserted that helped to brighten up this 
offering. Tot Qualters won individual ap- 
plause after telling how she "murdered" the 
"shimmey " in the - West. Bussey has a 
great piece of material in "Move On," as it 
contains good singing, a band full of jazz, 
splendid comedy, a pretty set, and last but' 
not least, Jimmy Hussey. 

Pictures of the arrival of "The Prince 
Of Wales" in Canada and "Topics of the 
Day" were flashed during intermission. 

Rath Budd won admiration the first 
second she appeared- She opened with a 
popular song that was well rendered. A 
double number followed, in which she was 
assisted by her mother. The ring work 
she displayed during the second portion 
contained a world of wonderful feats and 
the stunts on the rope added to her prestige 
as an artiste. Miss Budd is pretty and 
the possessor of a smile that never seems 
to wear off. The act is presented 
artistically. .... .. ... 

C. S. Glee Club consists of thirty-two 
sailors who offer a number of songs with 
a strain of comedy in most of them. "W. 6. 
Newman directs and also sings a ballad 
afterward, being joined by the chorus. 
Comedy songs of the navy are mostly in- 
dulged in and the whistling number and 
an imitation of a locomotive, won applause. 
The act is good for one visit in each house 
and, considering the big chorus, will prove 
a drawing power "whereever it appears. 

Lew Dockstater opens his monologue 
with a discourse on "John Barleycorn." 
Some of the speeches ran too long before 
the point is reached. The lost part dis- 
cusses strikes, politics, and hands a pan- 
ning to President Wilson. Many in front 
resented some of the remarks and at one 
time hissing was plainly beard. 

Frank ie Wilson. A Modern Mirage -dis- 
closed her form around many pretty slides 
and held many in. J. D. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



(Continued on pages • and It) 



RIVERSIDE 

D'Amour and Douglas, in a well put on 
equilibrist act, opened the show and did 
excellently. The men are young, good 
looking and fine performers. The act is 
an excellent opener. 

Green and Myra, dancing violinists, 
played a number of popular selections, the 
young lady sang and the pair danced off 
to a medley of semi-popular numbers. 

Howard Langford, with all the marks 
of a Broadway musical comedy comedian 
and with considerable more assurance than 
the average vaudeville entertainer, as- 
sisted by Anna Fredericks, showed the 
familiar song and dance playlet, "Shop- 
ping." There is considerable good ma- 
terial in the little piece and Miss Fred- 
ericks makes an excellent foil for the 
clever Langford. 

Henry Sylvester and Maida Vance, also- 
a clever comedian and singing assistant, 
followed, and their act, in so far as prin- 
cipals and work are concerned, so closely 
runs in the channels of the Langford act 
that one .wonders why they were booked in 
their respective' positions. They .were, 
however, so comparisons were inevitable. 

Sylvester iB clever and made the most 
out of some clever, songs and comedy bits. 
The act, however, is not as well put to- 
gether as it might have been, as the 
strongest parts axe in the beginning, 
corking comedy song called "Laughing 
Water" was sung early in the act and 
scored one of the big hits of the offering. 
Miss Vance did some excellent work and 
' a lot of applause rewarded their efforts. 

Mosconi Brothers and Elsie La Mont 
cleaned up the first half with some clever 
singing' (yes, Max Hart has taught the 
boys a song) and their familiar dancing. 
Miss La Mont dances well and is a bright 
spot in the act, but, naturally, the hip 
feature is the really wonderful dancing 
of the boys. 

After "Topics of the Day, 1 ' which fol- 
lowed the intermission period, Helen _Trix 
and her sister Josephine scored a hit of 
big proportions with some finely rendered 
special numbers ■written by .Misa ' Trix. 
Both girts sing well and Miss Trix plavs 
the accompaniments of her sister, who 
does most of the solo work, with i-eal 
charm. All the songs are good, melodious 
and of exceptional lyri-al merit. 

Harriet Kempel's sketch, "Tarrv Town," 
a rustic olaylet dealing with the home- 
coming of a man who. vears before, had 
left his country home to go to the city 
and seek his foitune. dragged badly in 
■-.nota and. as a result, did not hold in- 
terest until the finish. The story is that 
of a man, grown old and wealthy, who, 
by chance, returns to his old town and 
passes the house in which he was born. 
A young girl and boy on their way to a 
masquerade meet-him in the yard, and in 
them he sees himself and his boyhood 
sweetheart from whom he had separated 
many years before. The dialogue deals 
with the plan of the girl to sell the house 
and form a corporation, the business of 
which is to hunt up the early homes of 
successful business men and sell them 
at a big price. Of course, she knew sll 
the time that she was talking with the 
right party . and 'made the sale. Her 
mother comes' from the house. reco<»i>i»es 
her childhood sweetheart and all ends hap- 
pily. 

Moss and Frye are not telling about 
"How High Is Up?" but they have a 
score or more of clever nonsensical say- 
ings, the greater part of which aroused 
all sorts of laughter and apnlause. 

Burke and Valda,' a dancing a-t with 
a pianist, closed the show.- The team is 
a eoot. one -and, considering the late soot, 
did well. W. V. 



NEW BRIGHTON 

Of piano acts, the" program had plenty. 
Lew Pollack, unbilled, assisted the Creole 
Fashion Plate; Harry Carroll was' in evi- 
dence with Anna Wheaton; Felix Bernard 
tickled the ivories to the shivering of Jack 
Duffy, and a newcomer, who will be heard 
from in the future, is Sidney Marion, who 
jazzed an upright and a grand piano in ' 
'■Chicken Chow-Mien," not to forget Fitz- 
gibbons, of Marconi and Fitzgibbons, who 
is no slouch at the piano himself. ' 

Catherine Powell, who generously gives 
her maid space on the program under, the 
name of Adele, opened the show with an 
exhibition of terpsichoreau art that will 
soon land her beyond, the opening acts 
( lar.s. She '. offered an eccentric Spanish 
Tango, a French Pom-Pom, then did a 
good impersonation of Pavlowa's. "Death 
of the. Swan," and closed with a patriotic 
number. Miss Powell possesses personal- 
ity and dances exceedingly well. ','.'.' 

Marconi and Fitzgibbons offered a cycle 
of music on the.accordeon, xylophone and 
piano. The boys play well and gave a good 
acount of themselves. They would- do 
well, however, to add one or two more 
jazz numbers to their repertoire. 

The Creole Fashion -Plate, assisted by 
Lew Pollack at the . piano ' unbilled, was 
the surprise hit of the show. His female 
impersonation is excellent,, his poise and 
voice all that . could be desired, and, in 
addition. to this, he wears his gowns nicely; 
When he removed his wig, he caused a buzz 
of surprise that lasted, for three minutes. 
He is 'now featuring one of Lew Pollack's 
Oriental numbers and delivers it in a good 
manner. Pollack deserves some billing, 
however. ■ . 

Toney and Norman, minus ' their, well- 
known knock-kneed .dance, filled in for 
Konita and Lew Ahearh. . Toney's actions 
will cause anyone to laugh, and, judging 
by the joyful sounds emitted from the 
audience, there is no such animal as a 
"Blue Monday." Ann Norman's, comedy in 
the "hare-lip'' patter- was dandy and her 
laugh contagious. They received a big 
hand, but refused to take an encore. 

Anna Wheaton and Harry Carroll, a 
classy little team, - offered a number -of 
songs, old and new. by Carrol], and scored 
a solid hit in closing -the first half. A 
new act by this clever pair would be, wel- 
come as they have been showing the same 
offering for months. 

Beni. Roberts selected a Victor Herbert 
tune from "-The. Red Mill," whi?h his or- 
chestra rendered well. 

"Chicken Chow-Mein," .featuring Jay 
Gould and Flo Lewis, together with a cast 
of twenty, ran' for forty minutes and 
proved to be one of the big hits: of the 
bill. Flo Lewis is featuring her -baby- 
talk, which she does very naturally,: and 
some dancing. The latter did not contain 
much of the shimmy, but she can dance 
pleadingly enough to do without it. Gould 
does a lot of clown in?, is the chief come- 
dian and does a few. dances himself. Men- 
tion must also be made of Sidney Marion, 
who, though not billed, does excellent 
work not only as a pianist, hut as a per- 
former of merit. Two other men and a 
chorus . of eieht make up the rest of the 
act. which will be -found under New Acts. 

Jack Duff and Felix Bernard, on next to 
closing position, had the Coney Island 
jazz, fiends shrieking with delight at Duf- 
fy's .back-breaking wiggles. . Duffy is safe 
as long as the shimmy craze lasts, but the 
moment a new fad sets in — beware ! ■ Ber- 
nard did well at the piano and in his 
closing dance. The boys would do well 
to put some new numbers into their rou- 
time in place of their opening songs. 

The Rinaldo Brothers closed with' a good 
exhibition of strong-man work, done with 
silver make-up. .. ' • •" " G. Jv H. 



ORPHEUM 

The Dancing Kennedys, a man and 
woman, opened with a dance act that in- 
cluded a weak effort at comedy. The dance 
routine is fairly good, although it shows 
nothing novel. That portion centered 
about the shifting of the spotlight, proba- 
bly Intended for a laugh of 'two, fell flat, 
as it did at another house last week. Why 
the' Kennedys include it is probably. 'best 
known to themselves. Without it the of- 
fering would be vastly improved. 

': Duval and Symonds are a duo that pre- 
sent a neat appearance, and, although they 
work in a quiet manner, make the most 
of their material. "Their First Quarrel" 
is a clever vehicle and it is handled so as 
to get. numerous laughs. 

Louis Carter and Company, in a dra- 
matic sketch entitled "For Him," main- 
tained '. interest and registered heavily. 
Miss Carter, in the role of the old mother, 
was excellent, and the man who has the 
part of her son held his end up most ef- 
fectively. The third member of the cast 
also did well. In writing the act, the 
author probably found some difficulty in 
avoiding a tragic conclusion. The manner 
in which she steered clear of one is clever, 
and,, although it leaves a few unimportant 
incongruities, the playlet is acceptable and 
a suitable offering for any programme. 

The Dixie Duo, composed of Lieutenant 
Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake, at the con- 
clusion of their singing act received a 
round of applause that was a great ovation. 
After taking, two encores, they completely 
stopped the show. With- reach nunfber they 
sang, the audience seemed to want more, 
and they probably could have gone on in- 
definitely. ... 

The Mann ein Sisters, Mirian and Irene, 
and . David . Schooler, have a finely staged 
and nicely costumed dance and piano act, 
which closed the initial section of the 
show. The girls dance well and Schooler 
is one of the best pianists in vaudeville. 
There were a few of the ignorant crowd, 
who, for some weeks have been absent, 
present and they tried to disturb. 

Joseph L,. Browning has a monologue 
which consists of numerous clever bits, 

• some in rhyme, as well as a -, few ditties 
which he includes. In addition to handling 
his material in expert fashion, he adds a 

" broad grin, which he invariably injects at 
the psychological moment and which helps 
greatly in putting the act over.' He con- 
fines bis talk to three subjects, woman, 
man and love, in the order given, and al- 
though much has been said about these 
three, on the- vaudeville stage. Browning 
has, .-apparently, found a few new remarks 
.about them. Browning's "Timely Sermon" 
is very funny. ..^ 

Henri Scott, who sang with the Metro- 
politan Opera Company last season, and 
is now presenting < a singing act in the 
variety houses, is . finding that vaudeville 
audiences, if properly handled, will ap- 
plaud and appreciate classic music. He is 
a well-appearing performer, with a strong 
personality and. a voice of power and pleas- 
ing qualities. He injects a few remarks 
.between -his selections, very .wisely chosen, 
and keeps the audience well in hand at all 
times. He took two encores at this per- 
formance and. might have taken another 
had he so desired.' -...- 

Venita-' Gould imitated various stage 
celebrities and, in the semi-wjnd-np, scored 
a hit that brought a sustained outburst 
of applause. . Her. imitations of Grace 
I. a Rue. Jack Norwnrth, Lenore Ulricb. 
Bert Williams, Fay- Bainter,- Julian 
Eltinge, Mary Nash, George M: Cohan and 
Eva Tang way. were for the greater part, 
faithful. 

The Asahi Troupe, -a; -company of 
Japanese performers, have a splendidly put 
on magical act and held the crowd in un- 
til the very- end. The 'act is one of the 
best of its kind in vaudeville and the dif- 
ferent stunts' drew forth both astonishment 
and applause. I.S. 



August 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




HENDERSON'S 

Arthur H. Hill showed the folks, a few 
stunts on the velocipede, unicycle and cart- 
wheel. He is a rather heavily built man 
who gives an impression of being anything 
but an acrobat. His act is entertaining, 
and he got over nicely. He was assisted 
by a .young lady from the audience. 

Keegan and Edwards called . their act 
"Jazz as Is." Why, the writer doesn't 
know. The turn consists of a few patter 
numbers with a couple of steps thrown. in 
for good measure. . One thing we must say 
in favor of these boys: They have dis- 
covered the art of. how to get their stuff 
over. The imitation of Frisco was a riot. 
They had to take an encore. <■-.. 

James C. Morton, like a rare . vintage, 
gets better the older he gets. Morton 
and his family. amused the people out front 
immensely and . succeeded in stopping the 
show. He is a rough and tumble comedian 
and a tumble artist. His family render 
capable assistance. Every bit of business, 
every gag, every fall, was so put over 
as to bring forth unstinted laughter from 
the audience. 

Boby O'Neill, assisted by Evelyn Keller, 
a pretty blonde, offered "A Song and 
Dance Elopement" which pleased. -The 
only thing that spoiled the act was a 
mishap. O'Neill tripped on a wet spot 
left by Morton while doing a dance. The 
act concerns the courtship of a young 
couple set to music. They worked hard 
to please and succeeded admirably. They 
had to take several bows before leaving. 

The Four Meyakos are billed as "A 
Surprise From the Orient," and, what's 
more, they are. The act opens with some 
exceedingly difficult' contortion stunts by 
the two girls. And it may be said in 
their favor that they do them a whole 
lot better than a good many men could. 
The boy then follows with several violin 
selections and is joined by the girls in a 
string instrumental offering. They close 
with singing and dancing of the American 
style and were a riot. They had to re- 
spond to an encore, and even then the 
folks were not satisfied. 

Ed and Birdie Conrad offered their 
Honey Songs. The act is a medley of 
numbers dealing with love. They have 
pleasing voices, which blend nicely. The 
numbers are tuneful, catchy and well put 
oyer. Ed offered several bits of comedy 
business that won laughs. ■ The close, 
in which he changes costumes in front of 
the audience, for a corking Chinese num- 
ber, took the audience by storm and sent 
the act over for a huge hit. They declined 
•n encore. 

Gallagher and Rolley, following, required 
a complete resetting of the stage and, 
naturally^ held up the Bhow for several 
minutes. Their act is' a military burlesque 
called "The Battle of Whatstheuse." Gal- 
lagher is an officer and Rolley his orderly. 
Several burlesque . bits on military life 
were very funny and. as there were a 
large number of ex-soldiers in the audi- 
ence, they went like wildfire. 

Mile. Diane and Jan Rubini, assisted 
by a male .pianist, offered a musical act 
that was received with favor. Mile. Diane 
is an exponent of the latest French fad 
in dress, which appeals strongly ' to the 
male element of the audience. Her sing- 
ing and Rubin i's 'playing went over nicely 
and they scored a hit. 

The DeWolf Girls, Georgette and Capi- 
toia,- i offered their well known act, 
"Clothes, Clothes, Clothes," showintr -the 
life of a modern miss from dawn till sun- 
set. The girls have likable personalities 
and a clever act, whi»h they handle well, 
with the only natural outcome possible — 
a hit. 

Bert Fitzgibbons. the Original Daffydil, 
fooled and sang his way into a hit. He 
is a clever nut comedian and his stuff 
went over smoothly. His tomfoolery woii 
many laughs and he had to respond to an 
encore. ' ■"■' - 

The Upside Down Millets closed with a 
rhuWT equilibristi? noveltv on the rraneze 
tliat held them in till the 'finish. S. K. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



■ (Continued on pat* ») 






FIFTH AVENUE 

De Lano and Pike occupied the initial 
spot with an act, the greater part of which 
consisted of acrobatic stunts. They opened 
with a bit of a dance," and then one of 
them did some club juggling while he 
essayed a few steps alone. Some lifts and 
whirls, usual to strong man acts, followed. 
The feat of turning " somersaults with his 
hands tied behind his back was then ex- 
ecuted by one of them. They closed with 
a few stunts, using what looked like a 
small see-saw, to help them. 

Bernard and Merritt, two girls, pre- 
sented a musical 1 act that consisted of 
some work on the accordeon and saxophone, 
and also included a vocal solo. The play- 
ing of the two is fairly good and the one 
who sang was in good voice. There is 
nothing unusual about the offering, it being 
just one of a number of similar musical 
acts that do not attract special attention, 
but manage to find work. In fairness to 
the girls, it must be said that they held 
their own here. 

Goslar and Lusby, a man and woman, 
the former playing the piano and singing, 
while the latter danced and also sang a 
bit, worked zealously, but did not find the 
gcing entirely to their liking. The man has 
only a fair, singing voice, but, with the 
proper partner, he would probably be able 
to get along. The same goes for the girl, 
who dances acceptably. The two do not 
appear to team well, however. During the 
act the man rendered vocally several pop- 
ular selections, and his teammate did 
"several dances that were applauded. 

Billy Schoen scored a laughing hit with 
some talk about married life - and a few 
comedy songs, dealing with the same sub- 
ject and a baby carriage in which reposed 
his triplets. He made his appearance 
wheeling out the vehicle, in which were- 
three dolls, sat down, and got right into 
his work. A feature, of the turn which 
got him several laughs wsb' the crying of 
the "Babes," the sounds provoking much 
mirth. Some of Schoen 's talk is clever 
and a good deal of it is not quite ao much 
so, but he handled it well, and the crowd 
at this performance devoured everything 
he fed it with evident relish. 

Hermine Shone,' Jack Denny and Com- 
pany have an offering that includes some 
comedy talking, work on the piano, sing- 
ing, a dramatic recitation, and the feature 
of having two members of the organiza- 
tion "planted" in. one of the upper boxes. 
There are several bits included that are 
very funny, and the turn, generally, 
possesses sufficient variety to hold inter- 
est. Hermine Shone is a girl with a pleas- 
ing personality, Denny holds his end up 
well and the other two members do all 
that is expected of them. '-.'•■•' 

Marino and Maley, ''Wop" comedians, 
occupied ' the next-to-closing peg and 
scored the.big hit of the HDL They stopped 
the show after taking a few encores in the 
form of talk' and songs and then had to 
beg off.! The outburst of applause and 
whistling . at the finish was spontaneous, 
and they could have remained on almost 
indefinitely. They opened with some slap- 
stick comedy centered about the moving 
of a piano, and then drifted from that to 
talk on various matters. There ■ is much 
in the act that could be dropped to ad- 
vantage. The boys are a capable pair of 
fun-makers and do excellently with ma- 
terial that would not go as well if handled 
by less able performers. 

The Four Boises, three men and a girl, 
closed with an acrobatic act that was 
enjoyed by those who stayed until the 
finish. One of the men. a sort of light' 
comedian, did some thrilling feats, and 
the other members of the company also 
performed well. Holding them in after 
the preceding act was not an easy feat. 
but this quartet accomplished it. I. S. 



RIALTO 

(Chicago) 

La toy Brothers opened the program at 
the Rialto with a display, of nonsensical 
bits and a series of falls and tumbling 
that won attention. The comedian has a 
knack of putting over his bits, so as to 
win. laughs throughout. His drunk droll 
and actions caused incessant laughter. 

Harvey aqd Hanlon, man and woman, 
introduced, somewhat of a rube comedian 
and a fly actress. They carry a special 
drop depicting a countrified railroad choir- 
ing. There is considerable talk, some get- 
ting laughs. The man works as if the 
character is somewhat new to him. The 
lady is a good foil, doing well with talk 
and making little impression with her sing. 
ing voice. . , 

Izetta, a syncopated accordionist, opened 
with Sousa's "Stars and Stripes" which 
she plays in a masterful manner. She 
-then wandered into a. tuneful ballad fol- 
lowed with a raggy song, which was well 
sung, the number and her manner of ren- 
dering it called for big applause. This 
was followed by an instrumental number, 
"Dallas Blues" which also hit home. An 
encore was offered in which Miss Izetta 
sang "Have A Smile." Her costuming has 
been well looked after and her appearance 
is immaculate. The act scored distinctly. 

Weier and King, twp men, sang in splen- 
did voices and seemed to hit home with 
their audience instantly. They have some 
comedy talk which netted laughter. They 
finished with a yodel song, that sent them 
away to big returns. The boys make a 
neat appearance and proved u standard 
turn. 

The Quaker City Four brings back some- 
thing that vaudeville has needed for some 
time; a good singing quartette. The mem- 
bers dress as blacksmiths and work in an 
interior scene of a blacksmith shon. They 
onened with a. number entitled "Familiar 
Faces" whi"h was well sung and then ren- 
dered the "^nvilChoruij," using an electri- 
fied anvil for effect. Their individual 
voices are strong and in their solo numbers 
each individual registered. The Swede 
comedian in the act has a natural accent 
and is truly funny. His Swede song was 
splendidly rendered. The Quaker City 
Four are a welcomed come-back for vaude- 
ville as the field has missed acts of its 
kind. The act was roundly applauded and 
won out distinctly on merits. 

Hal and Francis -is a duo formed by a 
t'H': girl and a dashing young fellow. The 
sirl portrays the character of a country 
la<-.8, while the man plays the smart city 
chap. They have a cleverly written line of 
rross-fire talk that . contains laughter 
throughout. The irirl's song "The Sweet- 
est Story Ever Told." went over instantly. 
She noHsesses a clear, f.trong voice and 
knowledge of how to use it. The man is 
an excellent straight and carries himself 
well. The act made a strong impression, 
scoring bis returns. 

The Beatrice Morrell Sextette proved an 
entertaining set of feminine instrumental- 
ists" and soloists. Their opening, in which 
they are garbed in royal h\ne costumes 
and wearing white wigs, made a striking 
send-off. The sirieim; numbers were verv 
well don*, whi'e th°ir instrumental work 
v-a» entertaining indeed. There wa-» onlv 
one faw to be discovered and that wart 
a f«-w of the eirla evidently put their 
*«ake-uo on wi«h a mitty knife. However, 
thev dosed the first show in tip-too 
fashion a"d were rewarded with a solid 
shower of applause. . 



GOING INTO NEW THEATRE 
[AjrbMC. Au«. 1«> — Matheson Lane has 
entered into i»n arran^m-nt with Miss 
M«rv Moore (I«odr Wyndh'am) by which 
he will occupy the New Theatre, for a 
.•oas"n. ' 



BUSHWICK 

Frank and Milt Brittan opened with a 
lot of pep and, in the opening spot, were 
compelled to take an encore. The boys 
style themselves jazx-honnds and the man- 
ner in which they bounded jazz on the 
xylophone, trombone and cornet, certainly 
proved their right to the title. Both make 
a neat appearance and play well. 

Kerr and Weston; man and woman, of- 
fered songs and dances belonging to the 
same family as the numbers offered by the 
preceding act. While neither of the two 
is the possessor of a good voice, they de- 
liver their numbers fairly well, although 
more at. home when dancing. The dancing 
is along the lines of acrobatic and eccen- 
tric work and they have a nifty line of 
steps which they put over with a good 
deal of pep. The act has a very snappy 
and sensational finish, which sent them 
off to a big hand here. 

Dorothy Shoemaker * and Jack Rose- 
leigh. assisted by a Japanese valet, offered 
a comedy sketch that pleased. The offer- 
ing is weak in spots and the acting also 
leaves something to be desired. The play- 
let tells of a young couple who have been 
separated for a year and the time of the 
action is on the second anniversary of their 
marriage. The man goes into his room to 
retire and Just after he leaves' the parlor, 
his wife enters. He re-enters and finds her 
there. 

After a lot of talk, she tells him that 
she has fallen in love with another person 
who will come up to see him. She also 
says that she loves both the new party and 
himself equally. He threatens to shoot the 
new party on sight and she sends for him. 
But he turns out to be their baby, born 
while they were separated. 

Hallen and Hnnter offered a lot of patter 
and some violin playing by the lady mem- 
ber of the team. Hallen, who does the 
patter end of the act, is a dandy comedian, 
and the proof of it is the enormous amount 
of laughs which he garnered from the audi- 
>ence with some exceptionally old gags. 
, His delivery, however, is original and very 
clever. He would do well to get new gags 
and make his material 'entirely clever. He 
took an encore here and told a number of 
other jokes in his own style. The lady Is 
attractive and pleases with her violin play- 
ing. 

Ernestine Myers and Paisley Noon, as- 
sisted at the piano by Grant McKay, started 
their offering with an announcement by 
Noon, following which he and Miss Myers 
went through a pretty eccentric waltz. Miss 
Myers then offered her '•Hell-Cat" dance, 
which is some kind qf n Spanish affair. 
Noon followed with a jazz dance on which 
he c o"ld e'aborate a good deal, for he has 
already done much better than this par- 
ticular dance allows him to. The surprise 
dance of the offering came with Miss Myer's 
Oriental number, in which she wears what 
would be termed an' extremely startling 
costume for vaudeville. The dance, how- 
ever, as done by Miss Myer, is an artistic 
treat and the incense which is used in it 
lends a dreamy atmosphere to the number. 
A solo by McKay and a fast dance by both 
Noon and Myers, completed the' offering. 

Craig Campbell onened the second half 
with an aria from an Italian opera and im- 
mediately found favor. A selection from 
the "Bohemian Girl" and a rollicking sailor 
song also won great applause. His pianist 
rendered the quartette from "Rigoletto" 
and nlayed it well. He dosed with "Mad- 
elon." but wa« compelled to take an encore 
and rendered "PagliaccL". 

The Am nut Brothers, fiddling clowns 
who have advanced from the position of a 
closing act to having their name in lights in 
front of the theatre, gave a good account 
of themselves. The audence here liked their 
style of comedy and was not slow with its 
applanse. The whistling bit at the close of 
the act is very clever and scored a hit. 

Martin and Webb, the "wop" comedians, 
dosed the show and not only held the house, 
but took an encore and quite a few bows 
in the bargain. The boys work their 
"idant" trick with' good comedy effect and 
also sing and play their instruments well. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 20, 1919 




"CHICKEN CHOW-MEIN" 

Theatre — New Brighton. 

Style — if utical comedy. 

Time — Forty minutes. 

Setting — Full stage (special). 

Herman Timbers, Inc., Chef, is the 
billing under the name of the act, which, 
evidently, means that he ■ is the cook. 
Jay Gould and Flo Lewis have their 
names featured above that of the act, 
and, in fact, make up most of the offer- 
ing. 

But, Timber?, in cooking his dish, neg- 
lected to brown it nicely, for the act has 
a weak finish,' and had better be baked 
a while longer. And while the meal is 
being nwumed, he would do well to 
look at a few spots in the offering that 
need a little more rel i sh to give them 
better taste. 

Bat, as a whole, the offering will get 
over. Gould opens in a chefs costume 
with an announcement about the act in 
which be mentions quite a few courses. 
This is made in one and when the set- 
ting changes to full stage, he and Sidney 
Marion, who is a comer in the theatrical 
game, abow the audience how a song is 
written. Tie chorus of eight make a 
very good impression, for they are all 
pretty and, in addition, do their work 
well. The final setting shows the inter- ■ 
ior of a Chinese cabaret, and it is here 
that Flo Lewis is introduced with Gould 
in applying for a job. The two dance 
and poll a few gags which get over be- 
cause of the manner in which they are 
delivered. 

Incidentally, the chorus girls Imitate 
Loretta McDermott, Era Tanguay, Al 
Jolson, Ethel Barrymore, a "Follies", 
girl and a girl from Heisenwebera. And, 
although the imitations are not startling 
— what of it? The girls are pretty — the 
costumes exceedingly go, jazz is offered 
and that's what gets over. Flo Lewis 
later offers "some curious chatter com- 
monly called "baby-talk," any -one who 
has seen Flo wfl admit that she gets 
away with it. ■'■'. ■". 

They also have a "coke fiend's" dream 
"pat into verse by Gould and Lewis, who 
tell of some startling things. One of 
the girls does a pretty toe-dance and 
plays the violin at the same time. ' 

There is a bit of a plot to the offer- 
ing. Flo is a Philadelphia girl who has 
run away from her home to go on the 
stage, and Jay is her vaudeville partner. 
The owner of the Chinese place is a 
policeman, .who ia after Flo, as is the 
Chinese .waiter, who speaks with a 
.brogue. Her sweetheart also finds refuge 
in a Chinese make-up In banting for her. 
When she Is discovered, her sweetheart, 
Sidney Marion, and "Jay, dispose of 'the 
other two, and play checkers to see who 
gets her, using the girls for checkers. 
The finish is what is supposed to be an 
extempore burlesque on a melodrama, 
which has a few clever spots, to it, bat 
needs a lot of strengthening. The one 
thing that wiD make the offering a suc- 
cess is the cast that is handling it. 

G. J. H. 



NEW ACTS AND REAPPEARANCES 



SUE SMITH 

Theatre— Proctor's Twenty-third St. 

Style — Singing and Talking. 

Time — Ttcefoe minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

Sue Smith ia a capable comedienne. 
She has a pleasing personality, a sing- 
ing voice that will enable her to bold 
her own in the variety houses and, gen- 
erally, gives a most satisfactory per- 
formance. She ia nicely costumed, 
works with apparent seal and gives an 
excellent account of herself. At this 
house she scored a good-sized hit that 
was folly deserved. 

She opened with a popular tune and 
then went into some patter which was 
well delivered. Then came a light selec- 
tion, followed by some more talk. She 
closed with another song which went 
over well. The routine, while somewhat 
short was pleasing. I- S. 



Mcdonald and McIlaine 

Theatre — Jersey City. 

Style — Singing, Talking, Whittling. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting— in one. '. 

McDonald and McIlaine, a man and 
woman team, should be able to play all 
of the small time hereabouts with suc- 
cess. There is nothing unusual about 
the offering, bat both handle their ma- 
terial well and work in a showmanlike 
manner. There is not viry much talking 
in the act and that seems to be where 
they err, for they give the impression 
that they could put dialogue over well. 
The singing is fairly good and the man's 
imitations will hold interest. 

They opened with a doable song, 
coupled with some patter, indicating a 
quarrel between them. The woman fol- 
lowed with an operatic selection which 
she rendered in Italian. The man then 
reappeared and, after a bit of patter,' 
went into a cumber of imitations of 
birds and a number of "imitations" in- 
tended for comedy purposes. Some of 
these were good. A doable song closed 
and sent the act off in good shape. 

With some clever talk added and one 
or two good songs included, the act 
would be improved vastly, and probably 
be able to reach - the better houses. 

L S. 



STANTON AND WHITE 

Theatre — Uarlem- Opera House. 

Style-^-Tutking. 

Time — fourteen minutes. 

Setting — In one (.Special). 

Man and woman constitute the act. 
The man works as a Civil War veteran 
who ia now known by the sign in front 
of his home, "Uncle Tobey, Saviour of 
Souls," which means, according to his 
explanation, that he ia a shoemaker. 

The woman is from California, and is 
supposed to pat some kind of plot to the 
offering. She is supposed to be looking 
for her grandfather whom. she has never 
seen. Her father is the veteran's son 
and ran away from home years, ago. She 
has come to take her grandfather to her 
home. The plot is brought in at the 
beginning, and at the end of the'. act, 
between a lot of conversation which con- 
tains a great many exceedingly poor and 
very old gags. They finally discover who 
each one of them is. While they handle 
.their material well, the. act itself will 
never allow than to get beyond the 
three-a-day. -,.•, G.J. H 



O'CONNOR AND DIXON 

Theatre — Yonkers. 

Style — Talking and Comedy. 

Time- — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — In' one. 

O'Connor -and Dixon have a pleasing 
comedy skit that will find the going easy 
on the better small time. One of them 
starts the offering with a dramatic an- 
nouncement and then goes into an at- 
tempt at a dramatic recitation. The 
other, as a stage-hand, interrupts him by 
chairing soap which slips from bis hands 
every time he gets hold of it. 

A lot of patter and comedy of the 
"nut" type follows and is handled in a. 
laugh-provoking manner. The two do 
some comedy singing and dancing, and 
while they have one or two old gags in 
their material, the act, as a whole, ia en- 
tertaining and should get plenty of 
bookings. G. J. H. 



GREEN AND MYRA 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. , ■ ■ - 

Style — Violins. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

Green and Myra, a man and woman 
combination, have something novel in 
violin acts. The turn is nicely staged, 
and the performers look well and play 
well, having an act that hag been judi- 
ciously arranged and appears to be ready 
for a swing over the big time. . , 

When the curtain rises the man is 
seen sitting in one corner, the setting 
being in two. A partition in the drop is 
then made and the girl is seen standing 
upon a sort of -pedestal "and holding a 
violin. The man plays Drigo's "Harle- 
quin's Serenade" before her. She then 
steps forward and they play the number 
together, stepping nicely off stage. The 
girl then makes a change of costume and 
renders a "shimmey" song, ' doing a bit 
of dance with a few hand-springs, which, 
while contrasting sharply with the rest 
of the offering, appears to meet with ap- 
proval. The male member of the duo 
then renders a number, after which he 
plays the popular waltz from "May time." 
The girl reappears and, with both seated 
at opposite ends of the stage, they hold 
a sort of conversation, playing snatches 
of popular tunes, which suggest the 
words- This number has not been ar- 
ranged as well as it might have been, 
and the effects are not the ones desired. 
They finish, playing a number of current 
- ni ta t ogether and dance off stage. 

With a few slow spots bolstered up, 
the turn will have little trouble in the 
two-day-theatres. Green and Myra 
are a clever duo and have a good act. 

IS. 



GYPSY TRIO 

Theatre — -Harlem Opera House, 

Style — Dancing. 

Time- — Twelve minute*. 

Setting— Full stage {Special). 

Two men and a girl constitute this 
act . • • 

When the curtain rises a special drop 
is shown at the rear of ; the stage. 
Through a screen in the center of the 
drop two men can be seen playing cards. 
The girl enters, invites one to dance 
with her and what follows is very well 
done. The opening dance is snappy and 
sets a fast . pace, which is maintained 
throughout for the rest of the act. -A 
Russian dance by the other of the men 
is excellently done, and the -girl follows 
with a fair toe-dance. After a dance by 
both men, together the three close with 
a fast' number. 

The dancing is good from start to fin- 
ish and the one thing that is impressed 
upon the viewer's mind is the snap and 
vim with which they do their work. , The 
act should do for the better houses. 

G. J. H . 



SHERLOCK. SISTERS IN ENGLAND 

London, Eng, Aug. 15. — The Sherlock 
Sisters and Clinton, who have been ap- 
pearing in Copenhagen, Denmark, at the 
Scala Theatre, for the last four months, 
have signed a sixteen weeks' contract for 
a tour of London and the provinces. 



AL JEROME 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Magic and Juggling. 

Time — Ten minute*. 

Setting— In two {Special). ■ v 

Al Jerome has a special drop, and tries 
to make his act appear out of the ordi- 
nary, bat the actual stunts necessary 
to 'a good -magical act are lacking. 

He also does a few ordinary juggling 
stunts with halls. His tricks in magic 
consist of a few stunts with a handker- 
chief, a number of them with eggs and a 
few simple palming feats. Even some 
of the simple tricks he did none too well, 
for they were quickly seen through by 
the audience. The act is of small time 
calibre. G. J. H. 



FREMONT, BENTON & CO. 

Theatre— -Keith's, Jersey City. 

Style— Comedy Playlet. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. . . 

Setting — Full stage. 
This playlet, entitled "Breakfast for 
Two," reminds one of the large limousine 
which runs, short of gasoline daring its 
trip, and has to be dragged on by a 
. team of mules. The author had a clever 
idea to begin with and might have 
worked ap a sketch which would have 
done credit to anyone, but, after getting 
the idea, be fell short and not only failed 
to conclude -it in a clever manner, bat 
did not supply it with clever lines. 
Whatever - situations there are . lack 
action, and the offering, generally, drags. 
■ In addition; the cast is not up to the 
mark. The two principals fall to inject 
a punch into their work. Bat they are 
not entirely responsible for that, for the 
vehicle is not such as to enable a per- 
former to : display very much energy. 
The two minor characters are horribly 
exaggerated. Bat what they -have to do 
is of little importance. In its present 
condition, the small time will not be 
easy going for the act. Why the author 
saw fit to- call it "Breakfast for Two" is 
not very clear. The breakfast, portion 
of the act is of little significance, and 
certainly not of much importance. 

As the curtain rises, a young man is 
seen conversing with his servant. He is 
in his apartment and, suddenly, a young 
woman walks in and announces that 
she has spent the evening there and that 
she had waited for him' till it was late, 
but, due to the fact that he had been 
out all night, she had been forced to re- 
tire before his arrival She explains her 
action by telling him that she has told 
his brother she was married to him. 
.Further talk makes/ it clear that the 
brother,. Anthony by name, had courted 
the young woman. - 

Meanwhile, it is discovered that An- 
thony has spread the news and tele- 
grams come in, congratulating the young 
"couple." The girl takes it with a 
laugh, but the man, Jim by name,- ia 
angered. '■ 

. Matters are made worse when Jim's 
aristocratic mother and his uncle arrive. 
Mother treats the girl with coldness, 
but the latter returns similar treatment. 
Jim, .who happened to be out of the 
room when his mother came in, returns 
and it is explained that they have not 
been married. Mother decides • that they 
win have to be married to avoid scandal. 
She- leaves -'with uncle when the sugges- 
tion "is made that she do so. 15ti - 

The girl's mother, meanwhile,'- has 
married Anthony, as was explained in a 
telegram. She and Jim have a"', love 
scene. Jim flashes a marriage lit«use. 
The girl resents his having procured it 
without her consent, bnt finally remarks 
that she will- never look at another man. 

LB. 



ELSIE SCHUYLER 

Theatre — Proctor's Twenty-third St. 
Style — Singing and Talking. 
Time — Eighteen' minute*. 

Setting — Special. 

Elsie Schuyler is a personable girl 
who has a nicely staged song offering. 
The turn has been put on in true show- 
manlike manner, and has some pretty 
effects. Miss Schuyler delivers her 
numbers in a convincing way, and has 
an offering which, if cut a bit, win reach 
the better houses. 

She opened with some verse in which 
she declared that "It isn't what yon 
wear, but how you wear it." A partition 
in the drop, before which she was work- 
ing, was then made and another girl 
acts, as model, while the principal 
manipulated a few. devices whereby vari- 
ous sorts of wearing apparel were shown. 
There were several other vocal numbers 
by the principal, all rendered in a light 
manner that won favor. L S. 



August 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




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NEW YORK, AUGUST 20, 1919. 



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CONFESS AND MAKE UP 

{From the N. Y. Timet) 

If it can be established that there are 
faults on both sides in the warfare be- 
tween actors and managers, a long step 
will be taken toward theatrical peace— 
which, with such amiable and generous if 
temperamental people, must eventually 
mean reconciliation. And as far as one 
can gather from the published statements, 
errors are pretty evenly divided. 

In any other trade or profession it 
is inconceivable that men and women 
should work for four and even six weeks 
without pay, as actors have had to do 
while rehearsing. Conditions in the the- 
atre are admittedly peculiar, yet players, 
like other folk, find it advisable to eat, 
and have need of a roof and clothing. 

The contention of the actors that they 
should be paid for any rehearsals beyond 
a stipulated - three or four weeks seems 
moderate in the extreme. Their further 
contention that they should receive pro 
rata pay for extra performances on holi- 
days and Sundays is likewise in accord 
with all sound precedent and sensible opin- 
ion.. 

Bat the managers refused .both requests; 
and when the actors offered to leave the 
question to competent outside judgement, 
securing Mr. Taft and Mr. Hughes as 
referees, the proposal was rejected. Most 
people who are in touch with modern ad- 
vances in the condition of employment 
will conclude that the managers have 
been swayed by an ancient and selfish cus- 
tom, which is as obviously outgrown as it 
is bad. 

Tl the actors had rested their ease on 
the "l»i«»»« thus stated, they must event- 
ually have won. Their contention is di- 
rectly in line with a great world move- 
ment. Unfortunately, they seem to have 
suffered no less than the managers from 
intemperate counsel and bad leadership. In 
spite of all their explanations, it still 
appears that they had no right to call out 
members who were playing under Equity 
contracts. The' argument that the con- 
tracts called for arbitration, and that the 
managers, by refusing arbitration; ren- 
dered the contracts void, has a plausible 
sound, but, for all that has yet been said, 
it plainly confuses two issues which are 
utterly distinct. The arbitration stipu- 



lated for in the Equity contracts relates 
to individual differences, arising between 
actor and manager during the engagement 
covered by the contract. If any manager 
has refused such arbitration, the fact has 
not yet been made public. 

The ; arbitration which the .managers 
have refused (and moat unwisely, as it 
seems) concerns pay for rehearsals and " 
extra pert ormancea — matters wholly in the 
future and totally unrelated to any exist- 
ing contract. Doubtless the actors have 
been self-deceived, beguiled by a telling 
phrase; but doubtless, also, their action 
in closing theatre after theatre has worked 
a great hardship upon managers and 
authors, upon their fellow-actors, and 
upon the amusement-loviner public. This 
is the obvious conclusion from the facts 
as thus far published. 

The chance that reason will prevail 
seems, at this hectic hour, to be not 
bright. On both sides well-Intended ad- 
vances toward an understanding have al- 
ready been made and rebuffed. Old friend- 
ships are sundered; hitherto loyal dub- 
mates have parted in bitterness. The 
actors have staged their strike with tell- 
ing dramatic effect, and the managers have 
played their role of unrelenting parent 
with indomitable zeal. But all this is not 
necessarily fatal to eventual reconcilia- 
tion. Artistically there must be vast sat- 
isfaction in the performance thus far. 
And, last as first, are they not artists — 
managers and actors both? 

Only one thing remains to a perfect 
production — the happy ending which they 
both know to be essential to a truly pop- 
ular success. Let the unrelenting parent 
relent and welcome ■ the wandering child 
— granting generously that, in spite of his 
wayward conduct, his heart all along has 
been right. Curtain, and a stirring march 
from the musicians — who are also glad to 
be back in touch' with the pay envelope. . 

Both sides have already suffered grave 
and irreparable losses. The. legal situa- 
tion presents features which are at pres- 
ent undetermined — indeterminable.' If the 
worst comes, it will be bad, indeed. The 
public, too, has. its rights. It was di- 
verted for a time by the sidewalk per- 
formances; but interest in that died soon. 
It has need of amusement and is learning 
to find it elsewhere. Verbum sap. 

THE BATTLE OF BROADWAY 

(New York Herald.) 

Some call it the Battle of Broadway, but 
it is far more than that — it is a nation- 
wide battle of the actors and managers. 
It has gone beyond the white lights of New 
York and entered the amusement heart 
of every great dry in the land. It is .an- 
other phase of the world struggle between 
employers and employed, labor and capital. 
For the first time in the history of the 
theatre many of the stars who have 
amused, instructed and thrilled the public 
have adopted the popular method of secur- 
ing what they consider their right* — strfk- 
. lug; that is, refusing, to work until the 
managers and producers recognize the Act- 
ors' Equity Association, which is the 
actors' union. The issue seems to be 
solely one of recognition. 

Both sides say they will win; the pub- 
lic wants the right to win. Wherein the 
right rests will be for arbitrators to de- 
termine. There should be some sensible 
way to settle the controversy before it 
reaches a stage of bitterness that cannot 
be overcome. The situation would seem 
to present an excellent opportunity to test 
the efficiency of arbitration. Anger and 
word battles never settle a dispute. It is 
the belief of the public that the time has 
come for conciliation. The public has 
something to say in the matter in the last 
analysis, for it furnishes the money upon 
which managers and actors alike live and 
wax fat 'and grow prosperous — when they 
do. 



Answers to Queries 



STRIKING HUMOR 



.,— I 



For many actors, the strike is just 
better excuse for being out of work. 



T. 



Shades of "Diamond" Jim Brady ! What 
aide would he have allied himself with in 
the strike? 



Around the Lamb's dub, the saying 
"As peaceful as a Lamb" doesn't mean ' 
much these days. 

We looked in vain for pickets outside of 
the Lexington Theatre when the actors 
opened their show. 

This actors' strike is the first thing the 
actor ever attempted that the press agent 
doesn't take credit for. 

Wonder what that sign in the lobby of 
the "Listen Lester" show means: "Entire 
new cast of principles." 



While the managers were holding their 
meeting on Saturday, a pianist with more 
or less technique was playing "Nearer My 
God to Thee" in the office upstairs and the 
strains drifted through the open windows 
to the meeting below. 

A newspaper reporter hands us this 
ditty: 

Press agents now can ne'er demand 

A high and fancy wage ; 
For now the actors without help 

Have landed the first page. 



Lieutenant Colonel- Earl Booth has 
done more marching in the actors' strike 
than he ever did in France. 



"Strike while the iron is hot" is not 
quite as appropriate at this time as 
"Strike while the weather is hot." 



" Tjjghtnin' has struck," the actors an- 
nounce. Why not open the Gaiety ajain, 
for l i gh tn in ' never strikes the same place 
twice? 



In the parade on Monday, a lone woman 
carried the banner "Too Many Husbands," 
and behind her marched almost a whole 
platoon of men. 



In direct proportion to the number of 
shows dosed, the cigarettes and — -er — other 
things in the managerial publicity depart- 
ment have shown a decrease. 



Funny that Gordon Whyte, who dishes 
out the Equity publicity, hasn't tried to- 
make us believe that the car strikers walked 
out in sympathy with the actors. 



These' dark shows live up to their names. 
"A Voice in the Dark" is silent. "Those 
Who Walk in Darkness" has stopped walk- 
ing altogether. "Dark Bosaleen" is. 



Since the strike began, it. has become 
fashionable among the actor-folk to wear 
clothes closely resembling the costumes 
worn by motormen and condnctorettes. 



Tell me not in mournful numbers 
Life is but ah empty dream, 

For the soul is dead that slumbers 
When the pickets start to scream. 

It was suggested at an Equity meeting 
that if George M- Cohan was to make good 
his threat- about running an elevator, he 
would have to join the Elevatormen'a 
Union. - v:: 



We hear that the names of some of the 
new plays now read 'as follows: "A Voice 
They Made Dark," "They Would and They 
Did* "Oh, What a Walkout," and "The 
Disloyal Vagabonds." 

. When one of the managers heard for the 
first time that William Shakespeare was 
an actor-manager,' be wanted to know why 
Shakespeare wasn't a member of the Man- 
agers' Protective Association. 



After the parade, Eddie Cantor and a 
couple of girls, w ere s een going into a drug 
store for a soda. "When Eddie came oat, he 
said, "I asked the waiter to give' us sep- 
arate checks. Work is work, and a strike 
is a strike." 



J. F. B. — The act to which you refer is 
"Tom Walker in Dixie." John B. Hymer, 
the author of- the act, plays the principal 
role in it. Read the Cupper's "Next 
Week's Bills" and as soon as . the season 
opens you can find where it is playing. 



No more can "Smutty Stories" magazine 
have tales about the innocent young chorus 
girl and the crafty manager, for, in the 
clim a x , when he has her in his power-r-r-r, 
all she win have to say is, "Stop, or TH 
tell my union.** 



Eddie Cantor sprung some new verses to 
a popular "blues" song at the actors' 
benefit. One of the verses goes like this : 

Ashes to ashes; 

Dust to dost; 

Show me a manager 

An actor can trust! 



A bit of humor was thrown into ft recant 
Equity meeting when Billy Kent told a 
story on the Glorias, a «*«•"** "lg team that 
had appeared in "Shubert'a Gftjiitiei'* and 
had not walked, out. They rang up the. 
Shuberta last week and frantically told 
Lee that -their Uvea had- been threatened 
by Kent. 

Kent's version of. .the story is that he 
and the Glorias trade at ' the same deli- 
catessen store and that, on the night of 
the Gaieties'' walkout, he had jokingly 
said to the storekeeper: 

"If you don't put poison in the Glorias' 
salami, I'm going to stop trading here." 

Th delicatessen man repeated the threat 
to the Glorias, and that is how it hap- 
pened. 

When Ed Wynn spoke at the Astor 
meeting following such a galaxy of stars, 
he said it reminded him of the scriptures: 
"After the golden offering, came tna sac* 
istns" 

"Why did you strike, Ed!** Wynn was 
asked by his manager. "Well, it was this 
way," Wynn explained. "Every night, - 
when Fd go to my dressing room I'd be 
followed by one of the other principals or 
a member of the chorus who would sit 
down and pour out troubles to me about 
the 'run-ins' they were having with you. 
And I grew so tired of entertaining the 
cast in my two by four and listening to 
their grievances that I decided to strike 
in the hopes of winning the privacy of my 
dressing room." 

Place: 45th street. Scene: An Equity 
meeting. Time: Any night. Cast: Any 
Speaker and The'Howling Mob. He rises 
on the table and says: "Fellow strikers: 
I. am an actor. (Great applause.) I am 
with you because you are right. (Cheers 
-and stamping 'of feet and umbrellas.) 
Stick! (The Howling Mob rises to its 
feet and waves' its hat in the air while 
Any Speaker . wonders why he did not run 
for office instead of running for a Shubert 
contract.) Stick!! (Same business is 
repeated with even . greater gusto.) 
STICK!!! (The Howling Mob shrieks 
itself hoarse, while the advertising man 
of a large glue concern who happens to be 
present thinks of using the speech In his 
next "ad" copy.) 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Lucy Daly was with "The Passing 
Show" at the Casino, New York. 

"And Her Golden Hair Was Hang ing 
Down Her Back" was issued by the Eng- 
lish Song Co. 

H. R. Jacobs controlled the Academy of 
Music, The Alhambra, and The Clark 
Street Theatre in Chicago. 

A. O. Duncan, ventriloquist, composed 
two songs entitled, ."The Butterfly and 
The Rose" and "After the Curtain Falls." 

Dbllie Harding died at San Francisco. 

"My Pearl's A Bowery Girl" by William 
Jerome and Andrew Mack, was published, 
by T. B. Harms and Company. 

Lalloo was with the Barnum and Bailey 
show. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 20, 1919 



FOREIGN NEWS 



GOVERNMENT REFUSES TO 

EXCLUDE AMERICAN ACTS 



STOCK AND REPERTOIRE 



ACTORS' EQUITY ISSUES 

NEW CONTRACT FOR STOCK 



Variety Artistes' Federation Angered by Refusal to Take Meas- 
ures Curbing Invasion — Federation Claims Foreigners 
' Are Taking Jobs from Soldier Performers. 



Latest Form of Agreement, Which Is Being Used by Many 

Agencies, Provides for Settlement of Differences by 

Arbitration, Along with Other Features. 



London, England, Aug. 17.— The latest 
attempt of the Variety Artistes' Federa- 
tion to exclude American and other for- 
eign artistes has met with failure. 

The federation made application to the 
Ministry of Labor, requesting it to apply 
the "Alien Labor Exclusion Bill" in the 
case and thus force managers and agents 
to refrain from importing foreign acts. 
The reply of the Government Labor Min- 
ister was as follows: 

"I am directed by the Minister of Labor 
to refer to his: letter on the subject of 
the issue of permissions under the Aliens 
Restriction Order to enable variety ar- 
tistes to come to this country for - em- 
ployment. I am now to inform you that 
the Minister has caused the - questions 
raised in your letter to be considered 
by the Aliens and Nationality Commit- 
tee which has been appointed to consider 
all matters affecting the position of aliens 
in this country. The committee in ques- 
tion fully concurs in the opinion. expressed 
by you that foreign artists should not be 
introduced for the performance of serv- 
ices which could equally well be rendered 
by British performers already in the coun- 
try. ■ . ; •'■-■■- 

"The view is, however, taken that the 
introduction into the United Kingdom Of 



members of the theatrical profession and 
the services which they perform cannot 
be regarded in the same light as the in- 
troduction of alien labor for employment, 
in industrial occupations, having regard to 
the fact that the functions which foreign 
artistes perform are frequently of a high- 
ly specialized and in some cases of a 
unique character, and the circumstance 
that unemployed members of the profes- 
sion are available in this country does 
not necessarily imply that they are 
capable of rendering the peculiar services 
for which the foreign artistes are re- 
quired. 

"In these circumstances the Minister is 
of opinion tbat where aliens possessing 
professional qualifications of a specialized 
character desire to come to this country 
for employment, no obstacle should, in 
general, be placed in their way." 

Although the influx of foreign acts is 
not as great as was anticipated, the Fed- - 
eration has raised a hue and cry against 
their importation, claiming that many dis- 
charged soldiers, who are variety perform- 
ers, have been unable to get work, pref- 
erence being given to foreign artistes. On 
the strength of this, they appealed to 
have the law invoked in their favor. 



MARIE AMBROSE SUED 
London, Eng.. Ang. 15. — Malcolm Stan- 
ley .Mackiiilay, proprietor of 8 vocal train- 
ing academy, has sued Marie Ambrose, her 
father, Jacob Tromp, and her husband, 
William Henry Bathurst. for an account 
of his commissions as business manager 
and trainer of Marie for the last seven 
years. 

Mackinlay undertook: to train Miss 
Ambrose when she ' was a child in 1913. 
Due to his training she became popular as 
a singer. In 1914. a contract was ar- 
ranged whereby Mackinlay was to receive 
commissions for all contracts that Miss 
Ambrose received. 

In July, 1918,. she was married to 
Bathurst and broke her contract. Mack- 
inlay sued. Justice Astbury, who heard 
the case, said that although the contract 
entered into between Tromp and Mackin- 
lay was rather severe, Mackinlay was en- 
titled to costs. As the singer was now 
working for nothing, however, the justice 
held that .Mackinlay could not collect costs. 



"LILAC DOMINO" CHORUS BACK 

London, Eng., Aug. 10. — The chorus of 
"The Lilac Domino," which is appearing 
a*, the Empire Theatre, here, under the 
management of J. L. Sacks, went out. on 
strike recently when a member of the 
actors' association, who was In the show, 
was dismissed. Sacks proved that the dis- 
missal had nothing to do with the man's 
being an association member, as be was 
dismissed because he had not lived up to 
the rules of the theatre. The association 
council advised the girls to return to work. 
They did so.. 



LADDIE CUFF WRITES PLAY 

London, Eng., Aug. 15. — Laddie Cliff, 
the variety, artist who has made several 
appearances in America,' has turned play- 
wright, having written a piece called "Live 
and Let Live." He . is now- playing the 
leading male role in "His Little Widows." 
E. Lewis Waller has acquired the play and 
will produce it, with Marie Blanche as the 
lead. .'■'.'-.-*". 



ARRESTED AS THE1F 
London, Eng., Aug. 15. — May Seymour, 
a variety performer, was arrested in Pic- 
cadilly Circus recently on a charge of being 
implicated, with' Louis Goldberg, in the 
theft of $445 worth of jewelry from Regina 
Singer, a dancer. Goldberg, it is said, 
had been living with Regina Singer and 
took some jewelry, which he gave to the 
Seymour woman, saying he had bought it 
for her. She smashed the jewelry in 'a 
lit of anger. The defendant was remanded 
by the court at Marylebone. 

BIG CASTS RETURNING 
London, Eng.. Aug. 15. — The managers 
of productions have again commenced to 
employ large casts. During the war they 
made a practice of employing only the 
smallest casts possible, with gratifying 
success. Now, however, that the war is 
over, they are commencing to spread out, 
as can be attested by the following, "Kiss- 
ing Time," at the Winter Garden, has 
thirty-nine principals; "Eastward Ho" has 
twenty principals and one hundred chorus 
girls, and Henry Ainsley's forthcoming 
Tolstoy drama employs thirty people. 



"DADDIES" OPENS SEPT. 2 

London. Eng., Ang. 10. — "Daddies," the 
Belasco production, will be presented here 
at the Haymarket Theatre by. Frederick 
Harrison, through arrangement with 
Messrs. Courtneidge and Mollison'Kidd, on 
September 2. "Uncle Sam," now at the 
Haymarket, passed its 200th performance' 
a week ago Thursday. 



MAY WEAR POLICE UNIFORMS 

London. Eng.. Aug. 14. — The standing 
committee of the House of Commons has 
passed a new police provision by means of 
which it is illegal to wear a police uni- 
form without proper authority. Exception 
has been made, however, in the case of 
theatrical, music hall and circus perform- 
ances. 



PAYS EXTRA DIVIDEND 

Manchester, Eng., Aug. 14. — An extra 
positive dividend of 10 per cent has been 
declared by the directorate of the Man- 
chester Palace of Varieties, which now 
brings the year's totals so 'far up to 15 
per cent. 



Paul Scott and several other agencies 
last week pasted up on their bulletin boards 
a new stock contract issued by the Actors' 
Equity -Association. This contract has 
never been made public, and many of the 
agencies have been unaware of its exist- 
ence. It provides, among other things, for 
the settlement of disputes as to interpreta- 
tion of orders of the management, or terms 
of the contract by arbitration. It stipu- 
lates that the actor shall furnish certain 
necessities in clothes and the manager 
others. 

A copy of the contract is printed below. 



STOCK CONTRACT 
ACTORS" EQUITY ASSOCIATION 
; LONGACRE BUILDING 
NEW YORK 



AGREEMENT made and entered into this 

t .... day of 19 . 

by and between 

party of the first part (hereinafter called 

"Manager"), and 

party of the second part (hereinafter called 

"Actor"). 

AGREEMENT OP HIKING 

1. For and In consideration of the sum 
'of One Dollar' paid by each party to the 
other and the mutual promises herein con- 
tained, the manager hereby hires and en- 
gages the actor to render services as such, 
and the actor hereby accepts the said en- 
gasrment; such hiring- and such engage- 
ment to be subject to the terms and con- 
ditions hereinafter set forth. .' 

2. It Is agreed that the actor Is to play 

(insert line* of parts.)' 

'"■' term"'' 

3. It is agreed that the term of this em- 
ployment shall commence not later than the 

; day* of 

19 . and shall continue until the 

day of 19....; and there- 
after as next provided. If the season of 
the Stock Company of the Manager herein 
shall extend beyond said latter date, then 
the employment hereunder shall continue 
for said season of said Stock Company and 
said season shall not end until terminated 
by one week's notice given by the manager 
to the actor. If the last date In this para- 
graph la not filled In, It Is understood that 
the minimum guaranteed employment here- 
under is two weeks. If both dates In this 
paragraph -are filled in, then the provisions 
of paragraph 5 shall not apply during the 
term of employment agreed upon. 

PAYMENT 

4. The manager hereby agrees to pay 

the actor the sum of v. 

Dollars each week during the term of the 
engagement and on the Saturday of each 
such week. 

TERMINATION BY NOTICE. ETC. 

5. Either party may. by giving two' 
weeks' notice In writing to the other, at any 
time after performances have begun, term- 
inate this contract. Said termination to 
be effective at the end of two weeks after 
said notice is given. 

'6. If this contract Is entered into with 
the actor, he being In the City of New 
York, the manager agrees to pay tbe fare 
of the actor from New York to the place of 
performance and back to New York from 
said place. If this contract Is entered Into 
with the actor, he being outside of the 
City of New York, the manager agrees tc 
pay the fare from that place to the place 
of performance and return. 



Transportation Includes the cost of trans- 
porting the baggage of the actor also, but 
not sleeper and parlor-car fare. 

If this contract is terminated by the man- 
ager he shall pay the fare as hereinabove 
provided to place of performance and re- 
turn. If the actor shall terminate this con- 
tract he shall not, only pay his own fare 
back but also the fare of the actor en- 
gaged to take hut place, not exceeding in 
amount his own return fare. 

NUMBER OF PERFORMANCES 

7. A week's work shall consist of not 
more than performances. 

DUTIES OF THE ACTOR 

8. The actor hereby agrees to perform 
his services In a competent and painstak- 
ing manner, to pay strict regard to make- 
up and dress, and to abide ( by all reason- 
able rules and regulations which the man- 
ager may make, and aa long as the man- 
ager fully performs his part, to render ser- 
vices to him exclusively. 

CLOTHES 

9. The actor Is to pay for such morning, 
afternoon and evening clothes customarily 
worn by civilians of this country at the 
present time, together with wigs and shoes 
appurtenant thereto as may be needed: All 
other clothes, costumes, appurtenances (in- 
cluding those peculiar to any particular 
trade, occupation or sport) 'and all "Props." 
shall be furnished by the . manager. • 

EXCEPTIONS 

10. It is hereby agreed that If the actor 
Is unable to render or Incapacitated from 
rendering services through sickness or 
otherwise, or If the company cannot per- 
form because of fire, accident. Act of God 
or the public enemy, then the actor is not 
to receive . any salary for the time during 
which such services shall not, for such rea- 
son or reasons, be rendered. 

NOTICES 

11. All rules, regulations and notices 
shall be in writing and shall be delivered 
to the actdr personally, except matters 
which refer to the company in general, 
which may be posted on the Call Hoard. 
Notice to the manager may be given in 
writing by handing the same to him per- 
sonally, or to the person who pays the sal- 
aries of the company. 

12. In the event any dispute shall arise 
between the. parties — 

(1) as to any matter or thing covered 
by this contract 

(2) as to the meaning of the contract 
or Its application to any state of facts 
which may arise: then said dispute or claim 
shall be arbitrated. . The manager shalt 
choose one arbitrator and the Actors' Eq- 
uity Association the second. If within three 
days these arbitrators shall not be able to 
agree, then within that time they shall 
choose a third, who' shall not In any way 
be connected with the theatrical profession. 
If they fall to do so - ; ) . f , .■ 

or hla appointee shall be the third. 
The arbitrators shall hear the parties and 
within ten days shall decide the dispute 
or claim. Said decision shall be final. Tbe 
arbitrators shall determine by whom and 
In what proportion tbe cost of arbitration. 
If any, shall be paid. The parties hereby 
appoint said Board its agents, and with 
full power to finally settle said dispute or 
claim, and agree that Its decision shall con- 
stitute an' agreement between them, hav- 
ing the same binding force as if agreed 
upon by the parties themselves. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, we have here- 
unto set our hands the day and year first 
above written. 

-•-'• '....MANAGER 

■•- • ...... .i.. ACTOR 



SEEK WM. E. CULHANE 
John Culhane, father of Wm. E. Culhane, 
is reported to be dying at big home in 
Rochester, X. Y. 



ROSE O'NEILL ON VACATION 

Rose O'Neill, of the American Play Com-. 
pauy, is on a two weeks' vacation. 

SIGN WITH POU 

Marie Sinclair and Florence Reynolds 
have signed for a special engagement with 
the Bali Stock Players. 



HAVERHILL OPENS LABOR DAY 

Haverhill, Mass., Arig. 16.— The Acad- 
emy of Music, this city, is to have a 
Winter season of stock under the direction 
of Jack White. The house will open 
Labor Day with "Happiness." Irene Snm- 
nierly and Alfred Sweuson have, been en- 
gaged for the leads, and tbe rest of the 
company will include well known actors. 

SHORT JOINS LEWIS AND W1RTH 
Dallas, Texas, Aug. 16.— William Short 
is with the Lewis "and Wirth Stock Co. 



Stock News Continued on Page 35 



August 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 



ragps 




IL/Jg! 



IDENTIFY MAN FOUND DEAD 
IN CEME TERY AS ANDY LEWIS 

Comedian Had Been Missing Several Days and Police Had Been 

Making Search — Revolver Found on Body, 

Which Was Unrecognizable. 



After being missing several days, during 
which time an alarm Tiad been sent out by 
the police and a general search made, the 
body of a man identified by • bis sister as 
that of Andy Lewis, the burlesque come- 
dian, was found laying on the grave of 
his daughter 'in Mount Washington Cem- 
e'ery last week.- There; was a revolver 
en the body and a note addressed to his 
sister. The body was badly decomposed. 
' With the note to his sister as a clue, the 
pclice called upon her to identify the body. 
This she did, with the assistance of Ben- 
j-niin Hides, who lives in the some house 
with her at 1217 • Fifty-seventh street, 
Brooklyn. They identified him by means- 
of a diamond' ring 'and pin and his 
Masonic card. He was buried at Mount 
Carmel Cemetery under the rites of the 



grand order of Free Masons, Munn Lodge,' 
Xo. lflrt, of which he was a member. 

Lewis was for many years,. with Al 
Reeves in his. shows, and had also. 'appeared 
in shows backed' by- Reeves and William 
S. Campbell. He worked the show over 
the Columbia Circuit, . appearing with his 
wife at that time. Maude Elliot. The show 
was called "The Marde Gras Beauties/' 
Later, he took out a show over the Progres- 
sive Circuit. .. but - when that failed, he 
closed the show, and went into vaudeville 
With 'Vera George and several other' part- 
ners, presenting new acts from time to time, ' 
but never attaining the popularity he had 
in burlesque. 

No reasons for the death were given and 
no information could be obtained further 
than what has been printed: 



JIM LAKE LEASES HOTEL 

Wabkixctox. D. C, Aug. 18. — Jim 
Lake has taken over the lease of the 
Rochester Hotel, which is around the cof- 
hit from the Unyety Theatre. He will 
ctutinue to cater to theatrical folk. • He 
also v ill rnn the Carcll House, anotlu-r 
theatrical hotel. 

Lake was to have placed a show "on the 
National Burlesque Circuit this season- 
but decided to remain out of the show 
business in order to look after his other 
interests.' ' ■ 

% *V.jC«J» ■'•'. .:--.r-i ." . . ,---■■ .- 

■LID LIFTERS" GET $6,000 

CLEVELAXn, Ohio, Aug. 18. — Lew Tal- 1 
bct's.:"Lid LSfters" broke all records for 1 
< pchintrx at the Empire, this city, last 
v " - ■<-■!:. - and- ' without nn extra attraction. 
Th-J> did $11,000. It's a corking good 
si aSv :-• •' :; • ." !' 



MINSKY OPENS SATURDAY 

The Minsky Brothers' will open their 
National Winter -Garden on Saturday 
night. .In the cast will' be George T. 
Walsh, James X. Francis,' Jack Shargel, 
Harry Bentley, Eddie and May Kantor, 
Bdbe Wellington, Louise Pearson, Mae 
[veurns and Frankle Lloyd. - 

Francis. will nor: open until Monday, as 
he dees not. close at the Union Square until 
Saturday ' night. . Jack ' Perry will produce 
the shows, while . Solly Fields will stage 
the numbers. Minsky is paying his girls 
$20 this season. 



LEA'S ROSTER NEARLY FILLED 

The roster of Mark Lea's "Cheer Up 
Girls" on the National Circuit will be 
Harry Seyon, Billy Benden. Al. Stokes, 
Bernie Clark, Harry Carr, Blanche Par- 
quette, Sadie Rose and the ingenue to 
Mgn. Lea will manage the show. 

PLAYING LAST BURLESQUE 

Harry K. ; Morton and Zclla Russell 
started an eight weeks' engagement, which 
will end their burlesque career, at the 
Casino, Brooklyn, last Saturday night. 
They are going with a big show after that. 



KAHN GOING FISHING 

Ten Knl.ii. outer cf the Union Squared 

Ihcalrc, l:aves New . York to-day 

(Wct'nCfday) for the Eay of Naples, 

.Vniiii', « he e he will spend ten days fluh- 

.ing.' Mrs. Kalin will also take the trip. 

WILL MANAGE "FLO FLO" . 

Frank Livingston, manager of Watson's 
£eef Trust last season.- will manage the 
Southern company of "Flo Flo" this sea- 
son. . It will open at Frederick, Md., on 
September 13. 

-CHARLIE W1LKINS CLOSES 

Charlie Wilkins has dosed with James 
E. Coopers' "Blue Birds" on the American 
Circuit. Ja;k Miller, who recently re- 
turned- from France, lias replaced him. 



"ALL JAZZ REVUE" OPENS 

Fremont, Ohio, Aug. 17.— Irons and 
damage's "AH Jazz Revue" opened here 
today. They are here for one. day only, 
opening in Cleveland tomorrow/ In the 
cast are Lou Powers and Margie Catlin, 
who are featured. Others are Pat Daly, 
Ray Kelly, Charles Glick, Bob Wolfe, 
Moretti Sisters, Pearl Hamilton, Nadine 
Grey and the Jazz Quartet. 

Sam I {eider is the inn nn kit, Joe Mack 
agent, Joe Heidlicka musical director, Ed 
Brietenback carpenter, and A. Turner 
props.' ' ' '. ' ''.'"'. '"" '""'' 



GUGGENHEIM WONT HAVE SHOW 

Dan Guggenheim will not put a show 
on the National Circuit this season, as be 
will not be able to get it ready in time 
for the opening. He will remain in charge 
of the Lyceum, Paterson. 



GOES INTO PITTSBURGH STOCK 

Maud Rockwell has been booked as 
prima donna of the Academy Stock Com- 
pany, at Pittsburgh, by Roehm and Rieh- 
ards. She will open next week. . ' .' ' 

"BIFF' CLARK TO MANAGE 
William "Biff Clark has been engaged 
by Sam Howe to manage his "Sport Girls" 
on the American Burlesque Circuit. He re- 
places Lou Sidman, resigned. 



WORKING IN CABARET 

Henri and Lizell, last season with 
Strouse and Franklyn'a "Pirates," are now 
working in the revue at Churchill's. 



. "BLUCH" COOPER VERY SICK 

James E.("BIuch") Cooper, owner of 
four shows on' the Columbia Circuit and 
one on the American, ia. confined to his 
home in Yonkera with - pneumonia. 'He 
was taken ill Monday night of last week 
while in Bcsfon,- where he had gone 'to see 
his "Sight Seers," which had just opened 
at Waldron's Casino. Without seeing his 
"show, he was rushed back to bia home here. 

His condition . late ' Monday was very 
serious, two doctors and two nurses being 
in constant attendance upon him. 
4 '- '. ■ Irrr — ' '/ ' — '■ '■■ 

GRACE FITZGERALD DIVORCED 

Jersey Citt, Aug. 14. — A divorce has 
been granted Louis A. Nendel, of 85 Mer- 
cer street, this city, from Grace Fitzgerald 
. Nendel, known on the stage as Grace Fitz- 
gerald: ' The case was 'heard before Special 
Master William R. Barrickle. Young and 
Margolies represented Nendel. 
- Mrs.. Nendel, who was formerly a mem- 
ber of the "Bon Tons" on the Columbia 
Burlesque . Circuit, failed to contest the 
-■nit. -. -v,..-;;- ...,:;:•• .-■*. 



BILLY LEWIS CLOSES 

Billy Lewis closed with "Edmond 
Hayes' Own Show" during rehearsal last 
week. - 



REPLACES GUSSIE WHITE 

Kitty Madison has been engaged to re- 
place . Gusaie White as soubrette with 
"Girls de Looks." She opened in Baltimore 
Monday.' 

RUBY LUSBY CLOSING 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Aug. 18. — Ruby Lusby 
and Nina Rochester will close at the Acad- 
emy here next Saturday night. 



« 



JAZZ BABIES" LOOKS THE GOODS 



GOES TO HOSPITAL 

I'atkkson. -N. J* Aug. 14. — Peggy Men- 
del, a member of Billy Watson's "Parisian 
Whirl." was taken to the hospital here to- 
day to be operated on for an abscess. She 
will rejoin her. show when she is able. 



'The "Jazz Babies." Peck and Jennings' 
new show, had its Inttial opening- last 
Saturday night at the Olympic. While the 
show was not set, the performances given 
left no doubt that It' will be onn of the lead- 
ing offerings on the American Circuit this 
season. ■ The programme states that lion 
Clark Is responsible for the book and num- 
bers and credit should be given for the ex- 
cellent entertainment he has furnished. The 
book Is full of good comedy scenes and the 
numbers have been carefully staged.. 

The owners of the ahow have also equip- 
ped It well with scenery that Is bright and 
Dl easing to the eye. The costumes worn 
by both principals and chorua are likewise 
very attractive. They are prettily designed 
and In good color scheme. 

Frank X. Silk featured in the offering, 
was extremely funny as a tramp. He has 
an easy way of working that Is pleasing 
and a smile that assists him in winning his 
way into favor. He makes a number of 
changes during the performance. 

Don Clark, one of our very best light 
comedians, was never seen to better advan- 
tage. He "fed" the comedians capably and 
his all round work was commendable. He 
offered a very neat wardrobe and made a 
number of changes. He had several num- 
bers that he put over very welL 



George Carroll Is doing second comedy, 
using a tramp make-up. He Is an earnest, 
fast worker. He does good team work with 
Silk. 

Sonny Lawrence, the juvenile. Is In a' 
. number of scenes and does very well. He 
has a half dozen numbers that were gen- 
erously encored. 

Krneat Stone does a good English butler 
as well as several other characters. 

Florence Whltford gave a good account of 
herself In the soubrette role. She has Im- 
proved greatly since last season, and Is 
putting her numbers over with a snap. She 
also reads her lines well and offers a very 
Y>retty wardrobe. 

May De Lisle, as Susette. handled the 
part finely, but. In the character of the old 
lady and her eccentric comedy role, she 
stood out. Her wardrobe pleased. 

Rena Vlvienne Is the prima donna and 
was in excellent voice last Saturday night 
for she had no "trouble in getting good re- 
sults. She also did nicely in the scenes. 
Her gowns were in good taste. 

With a few minor changes which every 
show needs after the opening, the "Jazs 
Babies" will be In shape to withstand the 
severe criticism it will be subjected to dur- 
ing the season. As it Is now. It Is a credit 
to the circuit. SID. 



Burlesque News continued on Page 29 



LEW KELLY PUTS 

OVER GOOD SHOW 

AT THE COLUMBIA 

The lew Kelly Show 'was selected for the 
opening »f the Colombia this season and the 
popularity of this comedian was shown ' by 
the big audience that packed the house. Mon- 
day atternoon. 

Kelly has n new show. Tile hook Is called 
"Tup Submarine Man." by A. Douglas Le:irltt, 
anil It wiik staged by ton iiunc.ni according 
in the programme. Ameta l\.vnen staged the 
numbers. 

The material offered Is cowl and just 
suited to Kelly. Hot a lot of It sounded as 
though It originated In the brain of Kelly 
himself, as none can think uny better In this 
line than he. -■■-■- 

. Kelly has a line of "dope" bits that arc 
new this season. They are extremely funny 
and be knows how to put them over. He 
m fces his entrance with a large rooster un- 
der his arm. The bird Is "ltowr ' this sea- 
son. He Is .ml using any of the material he 
ever, nsed before either. line ran hardly 
imagine tow all this "nnf stuff can be 
ground out. He Is u derided bit and a most 
amusing fellow; 

rii -rim It ijimiini |* again with Kelly and 
he worked Monday with all the conUdence a 
man can have, and nobody would think the 

part was new to him. lie is a great 

•■straight" man, being a hard worker and 
"fceillng" . Kelly the right way. Ills ward- 
robe Is classy also and he makes a number of 

change*. . 

Arthur i'litiiniii. whom we have known In - 
the past rs a "straight". nun.- has an excel- 
lent comedy port, when protraytn,j a "legit." 
which he does throughout the performance. 
Ills make-up Is good, his rolce deep and 
..ulicd to the part, and he dresses the part as 
It should be. He does nut overdo the char- 
acter, but bandies It in a true sense of 
humor. 

Larry - Leewood Is doing a Mark face. He 
seemed rather uervous Monday, but will, no 
doubt, overcome this before many shows have 
pissed, as he has a good part and It can be 
worked -up greatly. '. 

Dudley Farnwarth Is the juvenile. He Is a 
licit looking chap. 'dresses well and ran put 
n number over. 

Jeanette Buckley breezed right Into favor 
otter several seasons In vaudeville. She 
looks great, has a most pleasing personality, 
known bow to rend lines and "feeds" the 
comedian nicely. Miss Buckley has a good 
talking and singing voire and she easily got 
all her numbers over for encores. Her cos- 
tumes are bountiful and. in tights, she looks 
charming. Miss Buckley's return to bur- 
lesque Is n welcome one as htr performance 
wan delightful. 

Helen Lloyd, a dancing and shapely little 
soubrette. had seme good numbers, which she 
put over very well. She does well In scenes 
and looks great from the front Her dresses 
are also pretty. 

Annette Hhaw Is nn Ingenue who can both 
sing and dance. She has a pleasing per- 
sonality and costumes that are simple but 
must atti-ctlve. 

The "coffin" bit was well worked up by 
Putnam and I-eewood. 

A -loifln :. talking and dancing specialty 
wsb offered In one by Hank Brown and Coin- 
piny, a min and woman. Brown Is a clever 
fellow and got Tils stuff over well, but the 
woman In only fair. 

The third scene In the first act. showing 

the submarine passing by the hotel, was well 

worked up. It was the finish or a rare be- 

. tween Raymond in one subtn-irtne and Kelly 

In the other, the latte.- winning. 

A table scene here with Kelly and Mlse 
Buckley at one, Putnam at the other and 
Leewood as the waiter, offered plenty of 
laughs. 

As a tinnle. Hoy mood offered a good num- 
ber, assisted by the chorus and all the prin- 
cipals. It wca well worked out and proved 
great. To carry It oht. the producer had the 
girls costumed In purple and orange, to blend 
with the color of the scenery which had a 
purple color scheme. 'The principals' cos- 
tomes also were of purple, giving a wonder- 
ful effec*. 

Fa rn worth and Miss l.lovd offered a neat 
singing and dsnclng specialty that pleased 
. early In the second act. 

The "love* bit. between Raymond and Miss 
Buckley was amusing, with Kelly, I'utnam 
and Leewood working it up. 

The "Chinese collection'' bit pleased as It 
was offered by Kelly, Raymond, Putnam and 
the Misses Buckley and Lloyd. . ; 

Miss Shaw, assisted by the musical di- 
rector, offered a slmrlng specialty that went 
over big. It ended with a corking good 
•dancing number. < 

The court scene In one. with all the prin- 
cipals, was well staged and proved an excel- 
lent comedy scene, which turned out later to 
be n dream by Kelly. , 

Some of the girls In the chorus are blondes, 
some are brunettes, while others are aubarn 
haired. They are all pretty and shapely. 
They work in the numbers; which were pret- 
tily staged, as though they liked to. And 
t w can slur also. .. , 

The costumes are a harmonious blending 
of colors, and the scenery Is pleasing to tht 
eye In coloring and design. BID 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 20, 1919 






SINGING ACTS 
RAVE OVER IT 




Nature's Own Joy Tune 



DANCING ACTS 
RAVE OVER IT 




The Bluebird Tune That Brings Joy 



MUSICAL ACTS 
RAVE OVER IT 






The Joy Tune That Makes 'em Rave 



BOSTON 
1S1 T, 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Lyric 



SEATTLE 
301 CUdnrinc Hall 

NEW ORLEANS 
US P hh— % PUc* 



ST. LOUIS 

Chanet Smkfin* CHICAGO 

SAN FRANCISCO Grand Open Hooaa MMjg 

Pantaffaa AhM SmVBi^ 



II 8EVI 



A SUne's Throw From the Palace Tbeflb 



August 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



IS 







■ 



DUMB ACTS 
RAVE OVER IT 




The Joy Tune That Brings Encores 



MUSICAL DIRECTORS 
RAVE OVER IT 




The Champion Joy Tune Off the Year 



THE PUBLIC 
RAVE OVER IT 







A Novel Wenrich Joy Tune Fox Trot 



> 



, i 



Next To the Columbia Theatre 



CLEVELAND 



PITTSBURGH 



PHILADELPHIA 
Glob* Tbaatr* Bo&finc 



312 



BUFFALO 
485 Main StrMt 



DETROIT 

213 Woodwin At*, 



KANSAS CITY 
CUywty Thaatr* BalUmg 

LOS ANGELES 

836 Su FmumJo Bmlifin*- 



16 



T HE NEW YORK C LIP PE R 



August 20, 1919 



^^^v^^^j^i^^^^^— 2£2~~^i^^ 






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INC. 



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pill open offices to manage WS^^^I^^^^^^ 
artists, in every branch of the 










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Legitimate -Vaudeville - Motion Pictures 



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r I All business will be transacted along legitimate 
lines, a square deal for both manager and artisti 

; -Bpoking^e absolutely independent^ 

Legitimate actors contemplating a vaudeville 
engagement will be supplied with suitable 
material, their acts rehearsed and thfe ei^^e 
production prepared for the stage. ^ 

|Sfew Stars for Pictures. New Atets ; vf or;5^|^jS|P 
v31e, New faces for '"'thfe legitimate. 

All under 
well. 



m 



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■ t-; i . UpykfliAMfaCtt 






*:a^i,*'H"'Xs>. 




m . m ■ 



direction of Joe. 



Temporary Address, 5 West 63rd St., New York 



■ %» 



''.>• v ; f :. ■' ■■" : ''-. ; " --. 



"><^. -.**«• - 



August 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



. 17 



Soscha Beaumont has been. engaged -for 

"Bitchy Koo." -. 



George Sofranski is at Atlantic City, 
spending his" vacation. ' ..' 

N. T. Granlund, Marcus Loew's publicity 
manager, is on a fishing trip. . . , 

Doraldina is to be starred in a film ver- 
sion of "Sumuran." 

Doc Lynn and ' Viola Allen recently be- 
came the parents of a baby girl. 

Jobs MacFarlane has signed with Rita 
CHcott, to appear in "Luamore." • 

; R. George Burnett has been engaged by 
the Shnberts for "The Dancer." 



Monte Bine has signed a long term 
contract with Famous Players. 

Eva La Gallienne has been engaged by 
Mrs. Rita CHcott for "Lusmore." ■ . 



Laiar and Dale replaced Eranz and La 
Salle at the Riverside last week. 



(Florence Heutti has changed her name to 
Florence Court, her family name. 

-Will S. Rising has volunteered to sing 
at the Barney Fagan testimonial. ; 

Anna Berger Sullivan's mother, Mrs.: H. 
S. Harris), died in Chicago recently ■ 

?* -^ . -. >■••■ '■■■ * 

'■ Dagmar Oakland was married to Captain 
Garnette Rotan'.in Chicago recently. 

,5 : > ■•■ v -— — ^- .; r ;!.;';;'/■.■ -■..• ':.-■■- 

Hackett and Delmar are not working, 
due to a slight injury to Delmar's leg. • 

Billy Gould has returned from France, 
where be was entertaining the troops'. % 

Margaret White has been .engaged 'for 
the soubrette role in "Hello 'Alexander." 



'Charles Gillen, formerly accompanist for 
Grace La Rue, is the father of a baby girl. 

Johnny Morris has the leading role in 
one of Marty Brooks forthcoming girl acts. 

Richard Pyle is staging two revues at 
tiw Terrace and Marigold .Gardens, Chi- 
cago. :,: : : ^■■■■'. 



Mile. Diane and Jan Robini substituted 
for Ryan and Healy at Henderson's this 
week. ■ iJ'-t-S: .". ".:'■'■ 



Harry Sloane is now doing .the press' 
work for George White's' "Scandals of 

1919." ::-;;• v > 



; Dolores has been signed' by F. Zeigfeld 
for his new edition of "The Midnight 
Frolic." 

r 



Tom Jones cut his vacation short be- 
cause of the weather and arrived home on 
Saturday. 

Robert H. Russell baa been engaged for 
the Mclntyre and Heath sbow "Hello 
Alexander." 



Benny Freidburg, formerly with N. S. 
Feldman is now with The A. & A. Produc- 
ing Company. 

Jack Campbell, who has been. over, in 
France helping to entertain the troops, has 
returned home. 



Jennie Jacobs, after being operated on 
at Mrs. Alston's sanitarium, returned 
home last week. 



John Burke is to produce the shows at 
The Dauphine Theatre, New Orleans, and 
not John Block. 

Arthur Klein's ten-year-old daughter, 
Eleanor, is recovering after an operation 
for appendicitis. 

Kenny and McCune have a new song and 
talk act which is being handled by Charley 
I ltzpatrick. It opened Monday on the Fox 
time. £■£ •/:■ .. - :.'"■-■ 3 ■ "wZSp*? -• ' ■", '■: ' 



ABOUT YOU! AND YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



. Felix Adler is to play one of the leads 
in '^Frivolities of 1919" which G. M. Ander- 
son is to produce. 

Edgar Nelson has signed with Joe Klaw 
to create the role of Waldemar Timing in 
"Double Harness." 



Joe Flynn is in Boston for. Arthur Hem- 
merstein, heralding the charms of "Some- 
body's Sweetheart. ' 

Betty Varey and Richard Allen Carey, 
'the latter not a member of the profession, 
have been married. . 



Nat Holt, manager of the Los Angeles. 
Hippodrome, entertained 300 newsboys at 
his house last week. 



Mrs. Beatrice Hubbel Palmer, a San 
Francisco musician, is to make a six 
months' tour of China. 



Boyce Combes was out of the bill at the 
Majestic, Chicago, last week. Donald 
Roberts replaced him. 

Ray Hess, formerly of the Hess Sisters 
and now Mrs. Nathan Kamnitz, is the 
mother of a baby girl. . 

Robert H. Russell was signed last week 
for a leading role in "Hello Alexander" 

with -Mclntyre and Heath. 

: Charles Herttmann, formerly with Corn- 
stock and Gest, is'now with Universal as 
publicity, manager at. Universal City. 

Foster- and Bines did not appear at Mc- 
Vicker*s, Chicago, last .week. They were 
replaced by Ed and Lillian Roach. 

Dan Quinland and his daughter Gerald- 
ine have been engaged for "Hello Alex- 
ander" with Mclntyre and Heath. 



Bert Snow and Luda McMillan, who in 
private life is Mrs. Snow, have returned 
from entertaining the boys in France. 

Reneo Adorce has signed' to appear in 
"The Dancer," Edward Locke's new com- 
edy now in preparation. 

BUly Lang is the featured performer in 
a new girl act with a cast of eight people, 
presented by Marty Brooks. ' 

Vera Royer has returned to New York 
after spending a vacation in Canada. ' She 
will shortly go into pictures again. 

Fred Ward and Legotie Hoover have 
signed to appear in a new musical play 
entitled "The Magic Melody." 

Vera Meyers, daughter of Jake Meyers, 
billpoBter for Klaw and Erlanger, is a 
soloist at the Rial to this week., 

Kelly and Boyd are featured in a new 
girl act with eight people which has not 
as yet been given a title. ■'.,•■< 

Farnnm and Farnnm are with -the Red 
Cross unit playing the hospitals in the 
East. They were at Otisville last week. 

Jennie Delmar has opened in Tom Mc- 
Reas new vaudeville act, the '"Beauty 
Shop," playing Keith time. 

Paul Dickey and Inez Plummer last 
week announced the .fact that -they had 
been married since June 26th. ■ 



Ethel Clifton, who has been in France, 
entertaining troops, has just arrived home 
and is at work on a new play. 

Mona Morgan, grand-niece of Robt. E. 
Lee, will appear in a new production soon 
in support of a well-known actor. 



Silvio Hein, the composer, was arrested 
charged with driving his car on -the curb 
at Broadway and Eighty-first Street, last 
week. : 

Lottie Seick, seen in several Mclntyre 
and Heath productions, will appear in 
'"Hello Alexander," their forthcoming 
show. 



Harold Whalen has replaced Clarence 
Nordstrom in the '•Over Seas Revue," 
which will open on the Orpheum Time 
shortly. 

Ethel Ban y more is to been seen in a 
series 'of pictures made for International 
and released through Famous Players- 
Lasky. * ■ 



Roi Cooper Megrue has applied for let- 
ters . of administration of the estate of 
Harry H. Cooper .who died last May, in- 
testate. 



. Harold de Becker has been engaged by 
John' Cort to appear in. a new comedy by 
Earl Der Biggers, called "Three's a 
Crowd." 



Bonita and Lew Abeam are out of the 
New Brighton bill this week due to ill- 
ness. Jim Toney and Ann Norman are 
filling in. 



J. F. Marlow is with the Pauline 
McLean Players, at Akron, Ohio, where 
that organization is now playing an en- 
gagement. 

Frank Walsh and Sylvia De Frahkie 
have been added to the cast of "Fifty- 
Fifty Ltd.," which opens in Washington, 
August 31. '' . - . 

Alfred KappfJcr, . seen here recently in 
"Tillie," is recovering from an operation 
for- appendicitis at Sunnydale Farm, Marl- 
boro, Mass. 

Mabel A. BneU, the scenic artist, has 
been commissioned by Anton Sabilia to 
paint the scenery ' for his forthcoming 
production. 



Dayton Stoddard, formerly dramatic 
critic for the Evening Sun, has joined the 
publicity staff' of Henry W. Savage. 

Barry Melton and Bobby Bliss have been 
engaged for. a new musical piece by the 
Popular Productions, Inc. ' .--■•--• ■ ■■-• 

-. Sydney Sbielda has signed a three-year 
contract with Walter Hast to appear in 
"A Daughter of Two Worlds." ■■'.' 



PhiL E. Adams," in "The Owl," has been 
routed for a return engagement over the 
Pantages and Loew time. He opens 
October 5th. 

Leo Cahn, who was reported killed in 
action, has been discharged -from the army. 
He is back with the Joe Woods offices at 
1416 Broadway. •-■'-..■ •' ■ ; 

Eddie Clark, who wrote and staged "Oh, 
What A Girl," has been engaged to pro- 
duce "The Lady in Red" for its road tour, 
which starts Sept. 8. -".,. : '-j-:' ; . ' 

. Davie Beige and her husband, Marechel 
des LogU E. P. Hendrirkr, of the Belgian 
Mission, -have just returned from a honey- 
moon trip in Belgium. 

-' Rachel Dana has gone over from musical 
comedy to the drama and is now ap- 
pearing as ingenue with the Fritz and 
Lawler Players Company. 

Janet Beecher, sister of Olive Wyndham, 
and formerly the wife"of Harry R. Guggen- 
heimer, . was married to Doctor Richard 
Horace Hoffman, last week. 

Del and Edna Elliott, after playing over 
300 performances for the soldiers in France 
and Germany, expect to return in the near 
future, to the United States. 



WUner-Romberg musical production which 
will go into rehearsals shortly. '"' 

Lou Alter, whose last appearance on the 
stage was in Milwaukee with the English 
Modern Players in "Such Is Life," two 
years ago, will, return to the stage this 
season. : 



Robert Lawrence is a member of a new- 
ly organized dramatic company which 
opened at the Airdrome Theatre, Vallejo, 
hist week for an indefinite run. 



Arthur Huebner has several "tabs" be is 
booking down through Oklahoma. They 
are called the "Military Maids," "Liberty' 
Girls," "American Follies" and the "Allied 
Follies." 



Senorita Elenita Supulvida, a Spanish, 
singer who has been making a hit in Log 
Angeles with the Royal Italian Marine 
Band, has been routed over the Orpheum 
and Keith time. 



Margaret Maloy, of Rochester, is recov- 
ering from a serious mastoid operation;, 
which she underwent some weeks ago. 
She was with Cooper's "Belt Show," on 
tour last season. 

» 

w« H. Mnenster will produce a new play 

called "It's Up to You" written by C. Doty 

Hobart and Leonidas Westervelt. It is 

planned to bring the play to Broadway 

- later in the season. 



Rosemary Sill, the . sixteen-year-old 
daughter of William Raymond Sill, press 
representative for Lew Fields, made her 
stage debut last week with Lew Fields, in 
"A Lonely Romeo." 



Claude Badcliff is appearing with the 
Mac Stock Company in Brazil, Indiana. 
He was with the "Mile A Minute Girls'* 
on the American Circuit last season. The 
company will tour the South. 

A. B. Kaye is en route to America to 
stage the English play, "Luck of the 
Navy" at the Manhattan Opera House. It 
will open .on October 0. Kaye is general 
director of the Queen's Theatre, London. 

' .Charles Tbursby, Bn English actor, will 
make his first appearance in America in 
The Petroleum Prince." He is well 
known in England and is at present spend- 
ing a vacation of. a month in San Fran- 
cisco. 



William Sock and Frances White have 
returned from London where they have 
been playing since May. They will start 
o- their contract with Flo Ziegfeld in his 
Nine O'clock Revue" and the "Midnight 
Frolic." , 

J! t 2 rtam Lech l e »V who until recently was 
utility cashier in the B. S. Moss theatres, 
has been engaged by the Famous Players- 
Lasky people to work in a like capacity in 
their. Rialto and Rivoli theatres and is at 
present working at the Rialto. 

Helen Carrie, private secretary and 
playreader to David Belasco, has been en- 
gaged by Joe Klaw to appear in "Double 
Harness." She will be understudy to the 
»**« feminine members of the company in 
addition to playing her own role. 

Kathryn Hart, one of the principals in 
the Shubert "Gaieties of 1919" has retired 
from the stage to marry Dr. Henry Hoff-' 
man, of Chicago. Miss Hart also hails 

:[ 0n L, th . e i W i ld J r Gt y> *•* "Ppearance in 
the "Gaieties" being her first In New York. 

Louie Kxeig, manager of the Gayety 
Theatre, Brooklyn, during the Summer 
months, built the scenery for the follow- 
ing shows: Mollie Williams Show on the' 
Columbia Circuit and Strouse and Frank- 
ly™' 8 *y° American Circuit shows, the 
Girls From the Follies" and "Round the 
Town." 



Rae Kossar, but seen in "Monte Cristo, 
Jr.," has been cast for a part in the new 



IThit it not a Fact Powder) • ~ •• 



18 



'•^m^AiW^j 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 20/1919 



: lWS»*.xrf? 



Absolutely, Positively Marvelous 



GET ABOAAD-SAIL INTO A BIG HIT 



$pgn$ 



[^ 



THE OHLY S0KG OF ITS KIM ON THE MARKET 







By KENDIS & BROCKMAN, Writers Off 
"I'M FOREVER BLOWING BUBBLES" 



I 



19 

I ■ 



KENDIS-BROCKMAN MUSIC CO., Inc. 145 West 45th St., Now York City 



August 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 





1 MUSIC MEN SEE END 

■ - OF TEN-CENT MUSIC 



:":V 



^£ »5M8 



Enormoui Increame in Production Cost 
Expected toKiiw Rata* Far Above 

■"; Existing Figures 

Publishers who have been in- the music 
line for years and who have qualified aa 
successful business men are' unhesitatingly . 
predicting the end of the ten-cent musical 
publication. During the past : two years 
the production cost has mcrJeased'' over 100 I 
per cent, and all indications are that a still 
further increase can be expected. - > 

..-Printers are already stating that with-' 

.the arrival of the fall season a higher rate 
will go into effect The cost of paper, in- ■ 
stead of coming -down with the ending of. 
the war, is being raised, and the condition ' 
of the labor market is such: that even the 

' most optimistic are not predicting . any • 
good news from- that quarter. 

... The ten-cent publication is sold at whole- 
sale to the ten-cent stores at a rate which 
commences at six and one-half cents, and 
scales downward as far as clever buying 
on the part of the syndicate' music buyer 
U able to force it. At this price leaders 
in the industry with the slightest idea of 
production cost state that- there- is no- • 
money in the sale and that he has only 
been able to do so on account of his me- 
chanical royalties or by making up the 
losses in this department by bis high priced 
music sales. 

Nearly every music publisher now has in 
his catalogue several of the songs which 
retail at thirty cents, and the experience of 
each one has 'been that it is practically 
as easy to sell at this price aa at ten. This 
discovery is responsible for the. appearance 
of scores of the high priced numbers, and 
singularly the majority of the season's bis. 
hits are numbers of this type. This con- 
dition which prevails in the music business 
has placed the syndicates which have a top 
retail price of ten cents on every article in 
their stores in a rather unfortunate posi- 
tion as they .can not ''compete with the 
music departments of other stores whose 
price is higher, and can therefore feature 
the high priced numbers. 

The solution at present is rather dif- 
ficult, but it seems that in view of the fact 

' that the public willingly pays the high price 
for musical hits a raise' to fifteen cents 
in the music departments of the ten-cent 
stores would be an easy and sensible plan. 
This may be contrary to the store rules, 
but the war and its after effects has been 
responsible for the breaking of more im- 
portant rules than this one, and the flve- 
and ten-cent stores would do well to give 
the matter serious consideration. 



:" : :' 




•'. - 






■'.-^:"*l 


-■" "• ; * 






1 --; 



WENR1CH HAS A BIG HIT 
Percy Wenrich, the composer, whose 
"Tulip'* song broke many a big sales ree- 
odr, has a new number out which promises 
to outsell that famous success. It is 
called "By the Campfire" and is issued 
both as a song and an instrumental num- 
ber. 



ENGLAND LEADS IN 

SONG EXPLOITATION 



Publisher Will Give Any Singer Intro- 
ducing His New Song, an Afar Trip • 

•tr 



FEIST SONGS IN 'TOST' AD 

'.Last week's issue of the Saturday Eve- 
ning Post carried a display ad. of Leo 
Feist featuring four of tho current songs 
issued by this house. They are "Friends," 
"IKnow What It Means To Be Lonesome," 
"Alabama Lullaby" and "Anything Is Nice 
If It Domes From Dixieland." • 

"HOME" SONG SCORES QUICKLY 

"When I Come Hoine to You," a new 
song by Will J. Callahan and Frank H. 
Grey, has scored a ' quick success and is 
being featured by many well-known sing- 
ers. It is published by Huntzinger A Dil- 
worth. " 



... AI_ GILBERT PUBLISHING 
AL Gilbert, the lyric writer, is one of 
the latest to join the ranks of music pub- 
lishers and has opened offices at No. 240 
West 48th St. His first publication! 
are songs entitled "Oh Caroline"' and 
"Peaches."- : . ^ '. 



MUSIC MEN ON OUTING 

The annual outing and shore dinner of 
the Greater New York Music Publishers 
and Dealers' Association, was held on 
Tuesday of this week at Massapequa Inn, 
I* /I. A big delegation of music mdn* at- 
tended, t/'ji •.•■'■■.■;.".- 



America has long been in the lead in 
devising new and novel ways to introduce 
a popular song. Before, the Music Bub-: 
Ushers' Protective Association • came into; 
existence the quickest" way. was to find a 
singer and pay him & good fee to introduce 

.the number. A big price and a large sized 
, bankroll got quick action, and competition 

•' became so keen that the publisher with the 
moat money .usually won and .the- singers' 
got, all the profits. ' "'..-;, ■ 

:■'.: The formation of the society ended all 
that, and now other means have been found 
to ..get Quick popularization of new 
songs. The soldiers in the army camps 
and abroad helped to pat many, a song 
over and scores of other means in addition 
to the professional singers are utilized. 

The Lawrence Wright Music Co. of Lon- 
don, however, is away 'in the lead in this, 
as it advertises that any singer 
who sings a Horatio Nicholls' ballad at 

I any Blackpool theatre or Music Hall and 
wishes an air trip can get one by communi- 
cating with them. Flying trips over Lon- 
don are being made daily and scores of the 
singers have taken them. 
It surely is, a new arid novel way in 

which -to get a song introduced. . . 



RAY WALKER COMING HOME : ; 

Ray "Walker, of the "Gloom' Chasers" 
Y. M. C. A entertaining unit, is now in 
Paris and expects to sail for home shortly. 
Walker has been with the soldiers for ' 
the longest period of any of the enter-' 
tainers. 



CARL LAMONT ON WAY TO FRISCO 

Carl Lamont, of the Harry Von Tiber 

house left on Monday for .San Francisco, 

Wher he is to open a branch, office for his 

firm. On the way West he- will stop in 
Chicago, Denver, Salt Lake, and Los 

Angeles. -■;•;; '■:'-■• '•'■'•"?- .■■■■■'-. 



"JAMES" BOYS HAVE NEW SONG % 

' Kendis and Brockman, the "James'* . 
boys,' have released a new- song called 

■ "I'm like a Ship. Without- a Sail." This 
£ number is the fourth which they have pre- 
dicted will score a sure-fire hit. Their - 
previous predictions regarding songs hav»- 

' ail come true. They wrote and picked 
"Bubbles" for a sure-fire. They sold it 
to J. H. Remick & Co., who up to date, at 
the 'high price, have disposed of over a 
million copies. The second, 'T rynow 
What.lt Means To Be Lonesome," sold 
several weeks ago to Leo Feist, is one of 
the big sellers of the season. "Golden 
Gate," also sold to the Feist house, is 
already , an ' established success, and pub- 
lishers are looking on with interest re- 
garding the future of the "Sail". song. 

DAVID WRITES SPECIAL SONG 

Lee David has written a song entitled' 

"Dancing on the Maodalay" as a special 



GOODWIN BACK WITH STERN A CO^ 

Harry: Goodwin, ^■f^.-^-'v^Ji^^e^mS3tt^''tm^:fhB Delaware" Zti'Sad- 
ftfcMSHF" been •» ^'P'* ***»- #fc non a 8. Co. David; received a large wwh 

A TC W - has ruw,tDo^ M« >,,rx„^«Kl» Aim-. 1 * m _ _ a_# _ __ aJ __ ae. _J S . , a 



SONG AND PICTURE SCORE 

One of. the moat successful of the many 
Mary Piekford pictures is "Daddy Long 
Legs-'' This photo play has bruta' ■cores 
of attendance records on the big film houses 
and has been booked for return showings in 
many of the large «ty theatres. The 
Broadway Music Corp. song of the same ■ 
name is also meeting'. with much success 
'and bids fair to rival the popularity of 
the famous picture. . » ■'•' '■-••; 

HILUAM PLACING MANY SONGS 

Laent. B. C. HUliam, of the English 
army, is placing a number of songs with 
local publishers, A number .have been 
given to well known headline singers, with 
the "right to exclusively ■ use them for a 
period of weeks, while Others will be re- 
leased outright to the profession. In addi- 
tion to the songs, the lieutenant has com- 
pleted the score for two ' new musical 



E. F.' has received his honorable dis- 
charge and is back in his old position in 
the Jos. W. Stern & Co. advertising de- 
partment. 



MACK HAS A NEW SONG .. 

Happy Mack, the singing song-writer, 
has just completed a new song and soft- 
shoe dance entitled "Mandy Loo, I Lore 
Y'.a." The number is dedicated to the 
National Vaudeville Association. *! ' 



HARRY TENNY PROMOTED 
-. - Harry Tenny has been -promoted to the 
position of general professional manager of 
the Joe. W. Stern ft Co. house. He will 
have charge of both eastern and Western 
i professional departments Of the company. 

H V SAM FOX IN LOS ANGELES 

Sam Fox, tile Cleveland-music publisher, 
is now in Los Angeles, and for the next 
five or six weeks will exploit his publica- 
tions along the western coast. J - r,y. 

CHORUS SELECTS SONG' 
The big Community Chorus has selected 
the Harry Von Tilser song "Carolina Sun- 
shine" ' and wiH feature it during their 
coming concerts. 

CHURCH OPENS INNEW YORK ]:■ 

C. O. Church ft Co. the Hartford, Conn-, 
music publishers* have opened a branch: 

: office it Na 163 West 48th street, New 

■Yc*'.'K v.''-.-;, . - : ".:'^:v 



consideration from the company, which is ' 
to distribute 100,000 .copies. These free 
copies are to be used as an advertisement' 
for the steamship company and the B. C. 
Nice Co., Mr. David's publishers. A dem- 
onstration Is' ."to be given on board, the 
steamer. ■'.;■£<: ;■'>:'*■ ■'. 

FRIEDLAND FREELANCING j 
Anatol Friedland^ formerly of the Gilbert 
ft Friedland Co., has, since he withdrew 
from the publishing business, been doing 
considerable writing, and his songs will be 
issued by various bouses, "as* up to date 
he has not allied himself with any of the 
publishing firms. 



MttJLS OPEN IN ATLANTIC CITY 

Jack Mills has opened a branch office in 
Atlantic dtyy ; Eddie Mack is in eharge. 



NEW BALLAD SCORES HIT 

"Granny," a new song recently issued 
by the "Gilbert & Friedland Company, is 
being successfully featured by a number 
of well known singers. Gilbert, who Is 
now in vaudeville, sings it with fine effect, 
and after hearing him, other acts on the 
bill invariably write for it 

W1TMARK SONG AT PALACE 

Joe. Morris, of Morris and Campbell, 

playing- this week at the Palace, success- 
fully introduced the new Wttmark song, 
"Give Me the Snjtan'a Harem-" This 
number, which is being widely exploited 
by the Witmark concern, is by Alex Gather 
and Abner Silver. ,' 



SYLVESTER ft VANCE SCORE 
Sylvester ft Vance, an act that has met 
with much success" in vaudeville through- 
out the entire country and particularly in 
New York are receiving much" praise for 
their clever rendition of a number of Wit- 
mark songa' '" 

The work of this, -team la clever and 
clean cut and they have invariably a hard 
time getting off after the insistent applause 
that greets their work. They are partieo- 
larly gifted in song rendition and every- 
thing they sing is given an individual 
touch that tin delightful. Among their 
greatest song successes are "Desert. Love,-* 
and "That Wonderful Mother of Mine," 
both of which; are published by M. Wit- 
mark ft Sou. At the Boyal and Bushwick 
theatres the past two weeks,- Sylvester and 
Vance held the audience enthralled and 
they are doing- the same at the Riverside 
this week.: . 

ARTHUR HALL WITH MdUNLEY 
Arthur Hall, a well known phonograph 
singer, who is recording for a number of 
the big companies, has joined the staff of 
the McKinley Music Co. He is represent- 
ing the firm at various out of town picture 
theatres in connection with the showing of 
the Paramount picture "The White 
Heather," singing the song of the same 
name. '• • - - ' ■" ■ ' 

DETROIT WRITERS IN NEW YORK: 

Alma M . " Sanders and '■ Monte Carlo, 
composers of "Every Tear is A Smile In 
An Irishman'! Heart," tie In New York on 
a visit from Detroit. They are negotiating 
with a prominent firm for the production 
of a new musical comedy which they have 
recently -written. '. , 

VON TILZER WRITES A SHOW ';■ 
Harry Von Tilser, the songwriter and 
publisher ia wr iting tho musical score for a 
new farce by William OoUlaon, co-author 
of "Up In Mabel's Boom," and "The OH 
in the Limousine." It will be produced by 
a well known manager after tho holiday* 

WESTERN SONG POPULAR j 

"My Aminola," a new song issued by 
the Peter Madura Music House of Hihbfag, 
Minn, is meeting with considerable popu- 
larity throughout the West It la waB 
written, nulodious, and ia being used by 
many singers. 

EDELHEIT WITH FISHER CO.. 
Harry Edelheit, formerly with the 
Waterson. Berlin ft Snyder Co., and re- 
cently discharged from the- army has) 
joined the McCarthy ft Fisher staff. He is 
manager of the band and orchestra depart- 
ment- : . ■ k 

FARRAR TO GIVE RECITALS '•': 

. Los AnoexxB, CaL, Aug. 16.— Ceraldina 
Farrar is to give a series of eighteen re- 
citals while making her trip across the 
continent to join the Metropolitan Opera 
Company. Her first will be In Los . An- 
geles at the Trinity Auditorium on Oct a 

AL. HUN Of NEW YORK 

AL .BeUIll, western manager of the 

Broadway Music Corp. made a flying visit 
to New York but week arriving la tow* 
on Saturday. • '...•*.■- ■' "• --Vi 

BOXY LANG PROMOTED . : Jji 
Billy Lang has been appointed New 
England manager of the -Br o a d w ay Muste 
Corp. with headquarters at Boston. - 

HENRY STERN ON A VACATION 
Henry B. Stem, of Jos. W. Stern ft Go. 
is spending a -fwo weeks' vacation in the 

Adirondack mountain*. _ 



PLANS NOVELTY IN ENGLISH SHOW 

Lohdow, Eng., Aug. &— Percy Hatchl- 

aon, who is to produce "Tho Lack of the 
Navy" at the Manhattan Opera House, 

New York, on October 5, plan, to treat 
American audiences/ to the sight of a Zep- 
pelin falling in flames from the sky. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 20, 1919 



100% CATALOGUE 
EVERY SONG A HIT 



BROAD 



WORDS BY LEW BROWN 



■9i 




IT TILL Y< 





Here's that comedy song you've been looking for to rill that spot in your act. It is so easy that 



AI_. VO-. - IL2ER 



WOROS BY 
BOBBY JONES 



• • ■ r 



MUSIC BY 

RUBY COWAN and 
WILL DONALDSON 



. ". . -_ - --- -^ i.TS m ..... ' 




..;*':.* - - 



DEAR OLD 

DADDY 
LONG LEGS 



■ te ■■ 






. 



EVERYBODY'S 

CRAZY 

OVER DIXIE 



■he:vvon;der;song OF Tt 



c s_ a-.vT 



S HEAR FRO - 



WE'RE JUST AS TIRED LISTENING TO "DIXIE" SONGS AS YOU ARE. 
HOWEVER YOU NEED ONE, THE PUBLIC DEMANDS ONE, SO WHY 

' NOT USE THE BEST ONE PUBL1SHEDIN YEARS? THIS IS IT. . 

r • -fit * 

' ;.^~ • ft a- __ 



WORDS BY EDWARD LASKA 





This song has no competitors. The others have all come and gone a long time ago. ALCOHOLIC BLUES has had * 



240 Tremont Street, 
"Boston, Mass. 



37 South 9th Street, 
Philadelphia; Pai 



BROADWAY MUSI 

WILL VON TILZ 

145 West 45th Stn 



August 20 r 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



AY'S 



100% CATALOGUE 
EVERY SONG A HIT 



GET THEM 




I not claim any credit for making it—any little .publisher in the business could put It over. 



PS BY 



■ 

: 



; :- ; 

I 

I ■ ' -•■: 

- r - .... 



MUSIC BY 
• JACK STERN 

'.'-. • ■■--'•:; .■'■'■■ -. ■•• 

... • •• '""•'■ 

■ :- r •■*'•• •---■■ '---5? :■ ' i- ■ i'* : - ■ ■■.';•.'.# j ■ -; ■■-•■ .- ■ 
■: . 5**^fPp|£i ,#rfv?::w: .it*.;--. : • ■ 



.. .-. ,.. . . 
-~ - — ■ 



■ : 



H- • • - v- -: v.- .v.. -, ,•■.:•. --< •:,-• 

• ■•:.-'■: n ■-'■"- >'»*.* i;'st.;trft :■■;!' ■. : : ■ 
VOU HEARD THE MELODY OF THIS ONE? IT WILL HAUNT 
MEAT. FOR DANCING ACTS. MUSICAL ACTS AND DUMB ACTS. 



,'/ - ..." i ■ ' "■■ . '.'- -r-V' *«*?■■ -•-.■■-■ ," 

- ■ -Ah .::-■= . >v:^;w%:;^:.; v. 








mimous approval stamped on it by both the profession and the public Lots of unique and funny versions 



ORPORATION 



tsident 



ew York City 



Cak :Tiet Building, 
St. Louis, Mo. 



State Lake Theatre Bldg. 
Chicago, III. 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 20, 1919 



• - %$4 ■■' ■"" 






. -vit-v-C 5 ^ 



■.0j- •a''.-"- ■ > 





AS 



.. . - 



.•-■•.- 










THE DISTINGUISHED FRENCH TENOR 



- 



■ 



. ' sSsS&afc 






. - 



Assisted byftPAfiF HARRIS 

IN A NEW COMEDY OFFERING IN ONE SPECIAL SCENERY 



■:? 



A New Novelty Absolutely NEW The Thrill of Thrillers 

REYNOLDS DONEG AN COMPANY 

Playing B. F. Keith PALAGE THEATRE This Week Auk. 18th 

A New Act with Four— THE ^QRLD'S GREATEST and Incomparable 'M^^^SM 
HELEN REYNOLDS ^ ; ^M@@ ,^- ' I- 






:*?V, 



fiscr-- 



***** MAUDIE REYNOLDS 

• - ■ k v. i ..,;. ,.•■.-.':; . ••.'.• »■'. - ■ «*• .' 

i .'zt, ;■;,.-.-. ■ -r-sRJ.-.-T.'-.-.-- . •■ '' ■' "' ! - '■ 
LAST Word in Class, 






iffe 






■"/-•*** .>^. r ;-*''>&ii 



'-*-*.'.■ ^jf**'"!.'«. , '. r ^v * 



a ud Daring 



A} r . j . 



EARLE REYNOLDS^ 4 

■'■'-' -A"?-.-: ■. : '' , p'*- , »'(-v..4. 

".".■v-::'.-'.y7-J»;C;.r. -V 






A Happy Combination of Dancing and Skating, Interpolated with the Moet Daring, and Hazardous Feats Upon Any Stage 
Direction: Gladys F. Brown of Wm. S. Hennessy Agency ; f vi^03 Palace Theatre 



FRANK 



MILT 



,.-. . ■-,......- 

■ ■ ■ 



v.- •• 




TWO 
"JAZZ-BOYS" 



Direction, THOS. J. FTTZPATR1CK 7" ?> 

This Week (Aug. 18) KEITH'S BUSHWICK, BKLYN. 






.'■ ! :/( 



August 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



** 



B. F. KEITH VAUDE. EXCHANGE 

:>'"■.;■' ':,' r: . ^mr nu^onft ■ 

Fn l a oo P. a. Glee Club— Leona La HU- 
(Otber* to All). ' 

Blrerslde— I. Mtddleton— "Overseae Be»le*r"— 
Walter Ww m l m & Healer — lbs Kennedy*. 

H » Ha llon * Hunter — Roland TreTen On.— 
Mullen A Fronde— 8am Leibert Co. 
BBOOBXTH, S. T. 

3 Orf hetnn— Fallon 4 Brown — Munro* A Mack — 

Arthur Hani * Co.— Catherine Powell. 

Buehwlck — Gygl A Verdi — Olaxk * Bergman— 
Miller A Hack— Llghtnera ft Alex. 

nonrleraon'a — Jlmmle Lucas ft Oo. — Jlmmle 
Hnesey ft Co. — Henry Lewis. 

-Haw Brighton — Dorothy Tore ft Slater — Tana 
Comedy Four. -_-_-..',.,■.-,:.; 

.Bookaway— IMoaconl Brother*. 

BALTIMORE, HD. 

Olaen ft Jobnaon S— T rarer* ft Douglas — Julia 
Curtis— Stella Mayhew— Eddie Borden Co.— Creole 
Fsshlon Plates— Adolpheus ft Co. — Daley * Berbjw 
~&. C. Falkner. • ■ '■■•■' !. 

BOSTOH, MASS. 

.Kelth'e— arWestor : ft Va nee— Eekoma— Dorothy 

Shoemaker Co.— Bert Lory — Al Raymond— Joe. I» 

Browning— Kerr ft Weaton. -..-.•■.'. 

BTJTPALO, H. T. 

aaVae's— LIda MrMnllen A Co.— Jo* Towle—Mar- 
mein Sla. ft Sen.— Transfleld Slater*. 

r_ COLTJarBUB OHIO. 

Kelth'e— Prosper ft Marat 




For Next WMfc 



Hi p podrome L eon Vart ara— Lady oiga Towsgs. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Temple— Elinor* Williams— P. LaVar ft Brother 
—Jane Courtlope — Allan Soger*— Flnlay ft Hill — 
Artistic Treat — Ann Oray — Emerson ft Baldwin. 
OSAHD RAPIDS. hOOK. 
B a m ana Park— Onukl— Young; ft Wheeler— Im- 
boff, Conn, Cor.— The Plckfords— Chris. Richards. 
HAMILTON. OHT. 
Kelth'e— Diamond ft Brennan— Wallace ft Oilrla 
— McCart ft Bradford— Cool In ft Glass. 
. LOWZLL. MASS. 
s Xatth'a— LeVare— Jaxaland Octette— Morgan ft 
Kloeter— Pletel ft dishing— Felix ft Fisher— Bodl- 
noff— Mildred Valmore. 

MONTREAX, O AHADA. 
Kelth'e— Ben .ft Basel Mann— Ward ft Brothers 
— Plctro— Winston's Lions — Wayne ft Warner Qlila 
-IMcATOy ft Wl laon. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 
DaTia— Sherman. V. ft Hymsn — Wright ft Diet- 
rich. ■■ 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 
Balti's — Mrs. W.'a Surprise — Myrtle ft J erne* 
Dnnedln— Craig Campbell — Green ft Mjra — 
D" Amour ft Dooglaa — Moakoraa Ballet — The 
Brtsnts — Montgomery ft Allan— Julia Kslety. 
FOBTLAHD. 
Keith's — Emily Darrell — Florense Dno — Bra 
Taylor ft Oratton— Foley ft O'Neill -m™ Prince- 
ton oirls— a Oota. ' '■.:.-, 
TORONTO, "'^tTPB 
■haa'a— Dawson Sisters— "Man Hnnt"— Adelaide 
Bell Co.— Chaa. Erwln — Fern ft Darls. 

WABHTKGTOH, D. O. .... 
Keith's— Arnant Brothers— Willie Hale ft Brother 
—Belle Blatera— Bay as mocle . 

yoTjiioeTowu, OHIO. 
Keith's — Yates ft Bead — Briscoe ft Bauh — 
Joggling Nelsons — Tennessee Ten — Emma Oaraa 
Co. — Dale Brothers — Emmett By an ft Co. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

OHICAOO, tt.t. 

Majastlo— Grace La Roe — Ayon Barkoff ft Oo. — 
■neat Brane ft Co. — Jerome ft Herbert — Georgia 
Price — Francla Beynold — Josephine Barnard ft Co. 
— Bddy Dno. 

State lake— "At the Girlies' Clab"— Moran ft 
Wiser— Donoran ft Lee — Sam Hearn— Kobsn Jape. 
CALGARY AHD VICTORIA, OABADA. 

Orpkamn — Longford ft Fredericks— Ted Doner— 
Dnnham * O'Mallcy— Kay Snow— The Beeback*— 
Boss King ft Co. 

DO Hoiiras, IOWA. 

Orphenm — U. S. Jaxa Band — iNcwhoff ft Phelps— 
William Boa — Color Game— Carl Bmmy'a 
Kanaiawa Jape— Sbarroeka. 

DEHVIE, COLO. 

Orphetun — An American Ace — Heraobel, 
ft Co. — Dunham ft Bdwarda — Dare Ferguson ft Co. 
— Williams ft M itchell— Th ree Jabns. 
DTJLUTU, XXHK. 
Orphenm— Mrs. Gene Hughes ft Co.— Seven Honey 
Boys — Tip, Yip Yapbankers — Norton ft Lee — 
Msleta Bonconl— Bell ft Wood— Sytnf Van*. - • 
KAHBAB CSTY, MO. 
Orphetun — Blossom Seeley ft Co. — Clecollnl — 
Stereos ft HoUlatcr— Jimmy 8sto A Co.— BrgottTS 
LMMpntlsmt MabensarA An bnm— Lydell ft Mary. 
LIHOOLH, HEB. 
Orphenm — Frank Dobaon ft Sirens — Branson ft 
Baldwin— Clifford Walker— Bepe ft Dutton— Aerial 
Shawn— Swift ft Keller — QsrclnetU Brothers. 
LOS AHOELEB, BeVe) 
Orphenm— Harry Watson, Jr.' ft Co.— "Plano- 
Tflle"— Smiling Billy Mason ft Forreat— The 
Brsdaas— Murphy ft White— MUe. Nsdjs— ollrer 
ft Olp— Chinese Brass Band. 

.' MJX.-WAVILXM, WO, 
Orphenm — .Bra Shirley — Harry Or sen ft Co.— 
DoUy Kay— Bob Hall— Jenka ft Allen— Van Osiioa 
— Collins A Hart. - .. 

MXSaTXAPOLIS. afXaTjs. 
Orphenm— "Hot Yet. Maria"— Farrell Taylor A 
Co.— Martelle— Sidney ft Lownley— Kane, Moray * 
alodra— Donald Hoberta— Jack Morrlaaay ft Co. 
MEMPH I S . TEH ST. 
Orphsnm — Lambert A Ball — "Heart of Annie 
Wood"— Bd A Lottie Ford— Dainty Marie— Henry 
B. Toomer A Co. — Ha rry Jol e on— F risco. 

Ml LWATnCEE, WIS. 
. Orphenm — Oertrnde HoftTnan— Petri oola— Mr. A 
Mrs. Melbourne — Sidney Phillips — Whltefleld ft 
Ireland— Cnmmlngs ft White— Bender ft Meehan 
Bnos Fraser. 

OMAHA, HEB. 
Orphenm Mo rg an Daneera— Great Lester— Harry 
Hoimsn ft Co.— Lloyd ft Wllla— Mlta Jobnaon— 
Brodean ft SUrarnjooo— La Bna A Dnpre. 
ST. PATTL, HHTir. 
Orphenm— AVbertlna Bench ft Co.— Ann ft Mary 
Clark— Norwood ft Hsll— Kharum — Melnotte Duo- 
Bob ft Tip— "flweetlee." 

BAH FBAHCIBOO, CAL. 
. Orphenm — Margoerlta Byira— hm Barnlea ft Oa. 
- !HsHim Harrla — Bailey ft Cowan — MTIIIrePt 
Mower A Marie Hart— Bmma Halg ft Waidron. 



SEATTLE, WASH, - 
Orphenm — Bessie Clayton ft Co. — "Onxrent of 
Fan" — Blanebe A Jlmmle Onlghton — <Taatinf 
Wards — Haydon ft Brcclle — Harmon ft MoManna — 
Lambertl. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
. Orphenm— Trixle Frtganga — Janls A Ohaptow — 
Harry nines — Shelah Terry ft Co. — Clifford ft 
Wills — Nathano Hroth era— "B lrda of a Feather." 
■ ▼AHOOU V JtK, B. O. ' 
Orphenm — Jnllna Tannan— Will Ward ft Girls— 
Bryan A Broderlek— Gna Kellay ft Co.— Frankle 
Heath — Boyal Caecolgnes. 

■ WUtaflPBO, OAUADA. 
Orphenm— Mme. Bills — Belgium Trio— Begay ft 

Lorraine Slaters — Ja Dm Trio— Burt ft Bosedale. 

F. F. PROCTOR CIRCUIT 
(Weak of Harab II) . 
HEW TOBJC orx'X. 
sut Bt. -"Gin In the Air"— Francis A Oearbolt 
— Chaa. Upson Oo. — Pollard — Elrera Bisters — Kegel 
ft Mack— Henry A Adelaide— Corinthians. 

Rath St.— Anderson ft Yoel— Bert Barl ft Girls- 
Stanley (Upside Down Boy]— Simpson ft Moon — 
M. ft A. Clark— Bramlnoa— Helen Oleaaon Oo. — Al 
Sbayne — BI Tern sisters — Oordon ft Del mar— Tom 



W . HTDIANAPOLIB, IBS. 
Wilbur A Lyke— Yonng A Wheeler— Xarly Lalght 
Co.— Radio ft Bamiderj — Tronelle Three. 
JXBSXT* cm, B. J, 
Jaa. "Fat" Thompson — Otto A Sheridan — V. 
Beftsro ft Co.— Geo. JeaseH— Magee ft Anit a Cos 
lay ft Lnaby — Jobnaon, Baker A Tohnonn DaTllMl 
ft Pike. 

LASCASTEK. PA. 
Musical Hunters — Law Stoddard — Leonard ft 
WU lard— Madame Herman — Paul Brady — Earl A 
Cnrtns—DeLyte Girls— Maxwell Fire. 
HEW LOHDOV, OOHaT, 
Lillian Rockwell— Marfo A Hunter— Searl Allen 
ft Co.— Fern ft Lltt— Faber Brothers— Maria— A. ft 
D. LeBoj— Willard A Hamilton. 
sTTWABJt, H. ». 
Art Deacon — "ttn. Welllugton'a Surprise" — 
Man Broii. A Co.— Brook a A George— Nippon Two 
— 'afcFarland Slater*— Dotaon— M. Montgomaay. 
OTTAWA, oawADa. 
MeAToy A Wilson— Conlln A Glass— lavreon ft 
Cross — Wayne ft- Warren Qtrle— Magleya. 



Vlotoria. (First Half)— Laddy ft Tofstr asssBassl 
A Robles— Carlisle ft Boemer— Grace BaassosSai 
Scanlan. Deno 4-flcsnlsn. (Lett Half)— Brown's 
Dogs — Helen IfontU — Bthel Mae Hall ft Co.— 
Well a ft. Croat— b Wolf* Gilbert. 

BBOOBXTH, ». T. 

MetropoUtan (First Half)— Two Whit* Btapoor* 
— Millard A Doyle— Martin ft Courtney— u Wolfe 
Gilbert— Mrs Musical HIaaea. (Latt HaH)— Mor- 
ton Brother* — Foley A Xax Tore — ••rsshVms da 
Vogue" — Baxnea A Freeman — Minnie Bark* ft 
Band. 

Deatalb (First Half)— Al Rleaido — labor • 
McGowan— Argonno Fire. (Last Half ) — Cooper ft 
Lacay — McDarmott ft Char lott* — Armstrong ft 
Smith — June Mills ft Co. — Brown, Osrdnee as 



VaUoO (First Half)— Ttrralll. (Last Half) — 
WUUe Smii— "Janet of France" — Mnmford ft 

Stlllls**'. ^*"a**cr^" . • , . . 

Warwick (First Half) — Brown's Dog* — Dst* 

Thnraoy— GUlanOarleton Co.— Clark ft Crawford— 

Stanley 1 ft Masle Uugba*. (Last Half )— Ford ft 

Goodrldge— Ted Beady — "Dawn oa tb* Farm." . . 

*»aT—wssM*i • *rr» , 

Jim Baynolda — Howar A Jenkins — Taylor assssasal 
— Flea Petmwaa. 

(tint Half)—. Mas ft Mack— Worth ft Hart— 
Francis ft Hacket t tMai asssbai JaassasS * 
Smith— Tore* Daring filatara. (Last Half)— 
Francla ft Wllaon— Tbornton ft ~ 
raored A Co.— Peerlaao Trio. 



gstfajaj Opera House — Dotaon— Bush Brother*— 
Bluebird Three— M. Montgomery — Clinton A Boonay 
—Art Deagon — Hat Jerome Co. 

Grand Opera House — JnrenUe Folllea — Oopeland 
A McOlOBd— Flo Tlmponl— Ernest DuplUe — Boatlna 
A Barrett— Petrowae. 

Fifth Arenue— Delano A Pike— Coaler ft Lnaby— 
Three Bolsea— Merino A Maley— Mra. Wellington's 
Surprise — Chinese Jass TWO. 

Uftth St.— Oopeland ft McKlssllck— "Msrrled VU 
Wireless"— Bart Earl ft Girls— Otto A Sheridan. 

Mra St. — Nat Jerome Co. — Wohlman A Cooper 
A. ft. B. Lolber— Magee ft Anita. 
TOHKKBS, K. T. 

Helen Gleaaon Co. — Al Sbayne — Hippodrome 
FOur— Bronaon A Buoo — ZeUa Slaters— Nippon Two 
—Mario * An. Clark— Four Bolsea — Bnah Brothers 
— Fremont Benton Co. 

MT. VERS OH, H. T. 

Chlneae Jass Two — Clinton ft Booney — Booney 
A Bent — Hippodrome Foot. 

BBOOBXTH, H. T. 

Greenpolst — A. A B, Lelber— Johnson. Baker ft 
Jobnaon — Frisco Three — Magflye — Tracy A McBrlde 
-Jaw. "Fat" Thompson. 

Prospect — Booney ft Bent — Lee Jardya — Bill 
Dooley. 

Halsey— Fred Bldrldge— Merrlllca ft Dorla— Pearl 
Abbott Co.— BuaaeU A Derttt— Green ft La Bell— • 
Three Nltos— Francis ft orerholt— Corlno TU fun 
"Very Good, Eddie." 

AXLjeBTOWH, PA. 

Dancing Dlraas — Solly A Houghton — Marlon 
Weeks— J. B. Jobnaon Co. — Gert Morgan — Dobbs A 
Welch — Hooper A Bnrkhart— Bd Jans ft Co. 
AIXBOHXHT. FA. 

Al White's Heme — Hager A Pochard— MnUen A 
tnncla— Wheeler A Potter. 

ALBANY, at. Y. 

Selms Brats— Millard Brother*— Kelso A Leigh- 
ton — Helen Colon* Co. — Erie Zardo— Wyaf * Lade 
A Lassies— Monroe Brothers— Hope Vernon— Mary 
Howard A Co. — Harrey, Heney A Grace — Lucky at 
Harrla— Hackett ft Delmer. 

BIHOHAMTOH, H. T. 

Frank Joha* — Gerard a Monkeya — Chaa. Bartholo- 
mew — Weston A Bllne. 

OKESTEK, PA. 

B. ft. B. Boas— Lear Bdmnadeon ft Oo. — Arthur 
Rasal Co.— Bob Randell— "The Owl"— CoreUo'o 
Circus — Altboff Sisters — Morgan A Gray — Alexan- 
dria— Three Twins. 

OAMDZV, V. J. 

GoreUl's Circus — Altboff Sisters— 'Morgan A Gray . 
—Alexandria— Three Twins— 8. ft B. Boss Bags' 
Bdmnndaon Co.— Arthur flaval Co. — Bob BandeB — 

"The Owr." .• ■ i^ f,\ 

OLHOlaTHATZ, OHIO. •' 

*aor Boas* Faro ft Richards— Msey ft Arch— 
Bddle Herome. CO. — Onsrla* Martin — KlUmurm 
Jan*. 

- DAYTOH. OHIO. 

McNntt ft Brelyn— Howard A Scott— K. Smiley 
Co.— Strand Three — Bomas T..'an.a ejnasaajesfa, ft 
White— Princess Hal Tsl-Wllcos LeCwsr Co,— 

Jerome ft Herbert— Black ft White Bern*. 

EABTOH, PA. 
The Brad*— Hooper ft Bnrkhart— Done ft Welch 
— Harry Jolsoo Co. — Ed Jans ft Co. — Dancing 
Dorians Sab ine ft Goodwin— Solly ft «n«g*.«"» — 
Jack IngUs — Charles Abrean Troupe. 
KEADOfO, PA. 
Walman A Berry — M. A Jno. Dora— Billy Mc- 
Dannott — Weber A Badnor J. B, Johnson On, — 
Bans** ft Bafrd. 
ITT FXIKABITH. M. J. 

Garrisons—Jack AnUmas) .Co.— Bearal A Mack— 
"Very Good, Bddle"— Hadji Bamholt— gall* Nerada 
—Marino A Maley— "Fun of Pen." 

STTisfTBd. V. T. 
. Melo ft Blair— Charles Bartholomew— Weaton A 
Ellne — "Ob, SweeUe" — Orbea A Dixie — Barue 
Comedy Four — Krsns ft Wllaon— Canton Three. 
KABTTOBS, OOHH. 
"Hero ft There"— Cnba Crutch— Henry Cooper 
A Co.— Charles Dtngle Co. — Four Solorea— ■ Clare 
—Pearl Bessy Oo. — Mabel Phil Ins — Basdata — 
Rogers ft Lmnm — White ft Brown. 
nimnmnm pg, 
Oert Morgan — McCarthy ft Fay* — Bens** ft 
Belrd — "Brory Sailor" — M. ft Jno. Dore— Holms* 
ft Ler et a M arlon Weeks. 

HOLYOKX, MASS, 
Adele— Texas Comedy Four— Hamlin ft Mack — 
Geo. Yoemsn — Breen Family. 

KAXELTOH, PA. 
The Young er* S idney Townee— Smith ft larmer 
— Ma jwell Fire— Musical Honiara Lag Stoddard— 
Leonard ft WlUard — Dancing Saronaden. 
ITHACA. V. Y. 
Otben ft Dixie — Berne Comedy Four — Canton 
Three— Jerome ft Newell — Francla Fsy'e Two. 



A. H. Harlan— Three Kings — Wlllsrd ft Hamil- 
ton— MsrU— Worth Way ton Four— Lillian Rock- 
well— Searl Allen Co.— Fern ft Lltt, 

" FAfflSAIO, B. J. 
Rose ft Rice — Dare Olaicr — W. Fisher Co.— 
Augustine Stanley— Masnna Jena— Brandon ft Tay- 
lor — Sastoa ft Farrell — Olympla Four — County 
ofBclalB. 

FATSBBOH, H. t. 
V. Bergere Co. — Barbette — M. ft D. Dunn — 
Wright ft Detrtck — Frisco Three— Barney ft Hayes 

— Phantoe. 

PITTtCBUBO, PA. 
Msttus ft Young — Allen ft Richmond — Arthur 
Browning — Mrs. Bra Fay — Bell A Bel gi a»s Foui 
Dancing Demons — Noodles Fagan Oo. — Fred ft 

Albert. 

HCBAJTTOH, PA. 
Laasr A Dale— Hart ft Helen— Dancing Bero- 
nsders— Sidney Townee— Three asMS raorco ft 
B arke— Page A Gree n. 

SSBAilUSB, H. T. 
Oreaoant— Martin ft Twist— Wlnkel * Dean — 
• Brans A Wilson — H. A. Harlan — Xelb ft Blair— 
Frank Juhaa— "Ob, SweeUe." 

Temple — Hart ft Diamond — Fox A Ward — BIO, 
Bang Three— M. McCarthy A Co.— Frankle Fay ft 
Two— Three Malforda — B. Wayne Desman Holland 
A Bay— Coeds A Verdi— Maggie LeClalr ft Co.— 
Worth Way ten Four— Six Military Maids. ■ 
BCHEBECTADY, B. T. 
Jerome ft Newell— Bernard ft Meyer* Maggie 
Ledslr Co.— OoscU A Verdi— Six Military Mali*—. 
Hart A Diamond-Fox ft Ward— M. McCarthy ft 
CO.— Melnotte ft I^edum— Three Melforda. ■ 
TBZBTOH. B. J. ••• ' 
Paul Brady— DeLyte Girls— Earl A Ourtts— Sa- 
bous A Goodwin — "Decorators" — Juliette Bush— 
Walman A Barry— J. ft A. Garrlaon— Oroes ft 
Lafell — Madame Herman. . " 

TOBOBTO, QUaaYBsa. 
Dixon, Bowers A Dixon — Belle Mm lie gsBsss 
Wilson Co.— BUI Prnltt— "Girl In the Moos." 

TROT, M. I. 

Monroe Brothers — Hope Vernon — Mary Howard 
Co. — Harrey Heney ft Grace— Lack ft Harris— 
Hackett A Dalmar— Selma Brats— Millard Br u tli er o 
— Kelao A Lelgbtoo — Helen Collne A OS. — Brio 
Zardo— Wyatt's Lads and Laaales. 
TOLEDO, OHIO. 

Cummlnga A White— Prince** Nsl Tal — Wilcox 
LeCrolx Co.— JTerome ft Herbert — Black ft White 
Berne — McNott ft Brelyn — B. Smiley ft Co.— 
Strand Three — Romas Troupe. 

WOOsTssOOXXT, B. I. 

Beatles— Lang A Shaw— Foley ft O'NcU OcUto. 
YORK, PA 

Weber A Bldnor— Holmea ft LeVere— Jack IngUe . 
—Chaa. Ahearn Troupe — McOaxthy A Fall Taaai 
ft Dale— "Brery Sailor." 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

BXW TOM CTTT. 

Asiarinan (First Half)— Copland ft Wells— Knox 
A Ionian— Foley A La Tore — Bar. Frank Gorman 
— Minnie Bark A Jass Band— Star* Freds— Ethel 
Mae Han Co.— Barnes ft Freeman— The Valadoaa. 
(Last Half)— Kabn ft Boone— Jsrrow— Moalcsl 
Mis ses Mil dred Rogers— Pesrl Abbott ft Co. 

Bomlsrard (tint Half)— Krayona ft Co.— Me- 
Dermott ft Charlotte— Willie Smith— Wobar, Beck 
ft Fraasr— Fashions de Vogue. (Last Half) — 
Inlands— Manning, Feeley A Knoll— Fabor A Mc- 
Gowan — Grace Cameron — Bernlricl Brothers. 

national (First Half)— Morton Brother*— Care- 
nangh A Franklin— Armstrong ft Smith — Armstrong 
A Jamea— Leo Zarrell A Co. (Last Halt) — Dancing 
McDonalds — Al Blesrdo— Harold Selman ft Co,— 
King A Harrey — Allen A Tasls. 

Orphenm (First Half)— ilualetl Hodfas— Mildred 
Rogers— Newell ft Most— Arthur BoJllTaa ft On.— 
King ft Harrey— Besttlo ft Blome. (Last Half)— 
Foot Cllfforda — McOsabon Sisters — OaTaneagh ft 
Tumklne— Carlialo A Boemer — Anthony ft 11 fill 
The Valodooa. 

Ave. B (First Half)— Gladys K el ton — Ford A 
Goodrldg* — "Down on the Farm" — Mnmford ft 
Stanley. (Last Half)— TureUL 

BelaaoeF St. (First Half) — Lelaada — Kabn ft 
Boone — Bone Garden — Jean Lalgbton'a Bene — 
Welle ft Crest— Stafford A De Ross. (Last Half)— 
Krayona ft Co.— Millard ft Doyle— Henry Frey— 
La Hoea ft Dn Freece— Argonno Fire— Leo Zarrell 
ft Co. 

Greeley So, (First Half) — Cooper ft Tarej Mt 
Msbon Sister*— Manning. Feeley ft Knoll ta Boon 
A Do Freece — Henry Fray — BernlTid Brothers. 
(Last Half)— CapUa ft Wells— Boa* Garden— Jean 
Leigh ton's Berne — Clark ft Crawford — Musical 
Hodge*. . 

Lincoln So, (Flrat HSU)— Four Cliffords— Helen 
Moretu— "Poor Jim"— Anthony ft Deal tlTai ft 
Taxle. (Last Bait)— Karaay'* Myriaphone— Chaa. 
Beniy — Arthur SoBlTan A Co. — Weber, Beck ft 
Fraxer— BeatUe ft Blome. 



FALL KIVBX, 

( First, Hslf) — Francla ft Wilson — Thornton ft 
Thorntol— Betty Blared ft Co. — Peerleee Trio. 
(Lest Half)— Me. A Mack— Francis ft asasgajj 

Four Rube* — Langdon A Smith — Tbre* Dartsai 
Slater*. . 



Banlon ft Arthur— Murphy ft Klein— Utile Lord 
Boberta— Billy Brown— "Lor* A Kisses." 
kTOHTRXAI.. s M gsss ai i 
Yiung ft Leander— Lillian Calrart— Mr. ft Mr*. 
H. Phillip.— Lane ft Moran— lie* Anions. 
BXW BOCHKLLK, H. Y. 
(Flrat Half)— NsUIs Moo t * ''After the Honey- 
moon"— Eraser. Banco ft Hirdlir ftm Monti ft 
Co. (Last Half)— Chaa. Moratt ft Oo. ' 

pROvronrox, i_ l 

(First Half)— Musical Chrystlee— Frsncls ft De 
Mar— McCarthy ft Steruae— Merlin— Bella ft Oray. 
(Last Half)— Ferdinand— Plunkett— dark ft Fraa- 



PAIJBaDlS PAKK. H. J, 
Holden— FIJI Japs— Artoe* 
' Slater*. 

■FRIsTOinELD, MASS. 

(First Half) — Ferdinand — Plnnhett ft II lag 

CUrk A Francis — Adrian. (Last Half) — Musical 

ChrysUsa— Francis A De Mar— McCarthy A Starssd 

— Merlin— Belle A Gray. 

TOBOBTO. CaBtDA. 
Dolly ft Cslam* — L'Eatranga Ml see* — Three. 
Boaellaa— OctaTla Handworth ft Co.— Mel Klaa 
Hanlo ft Clifton. 

INTERSTATE CIRCUIT 

DALLAS. TEXAS. 
Majastlo— McRae A Clegg— Sheldon ft Daley- 
Werner Amoro* Trio— Barnes ft Crawford— Patrt- 
cola A Msyera— Dong Fong On* ft Harry Haw. 



-J, HO. 

•leke (First Half) — Waldeteln A Delay— Donald- 
aon A Gersldln*— "Day* of Long Ago" — Anderson 
ft Coins — La France Brother*. (Last Half )— Great 
Aroneon A Cu.— Starr A Oil more— Charlotte Trie- 
Bob B rown— Kebas tlan Merrill Co, 

OKLAHOMA CTTT, OXLA. - 

Lyrlo (First Half)— Jack ft Bra Arnold— Baa* A 
Bd ge L ouie Hart A Co. (L**t Half)— mis sal 
Vall-Clereland A Fay. asasaj— awa am 

TOFEXA, KAH*. 
Baralty (Flrat Half ) — Hana Hanks — Ward ft 
Dooley— York* ft Marx, (last Half)— Waldataxa 
ft Daley— Anderson ft OoUs— La Franc* Brother* 
—"Day* *f Long Ago''— Donaldson ft Oeraldtn*. 

Frlnoeea (Flrat Hsir) — BOa La Vail— Oswslaad 
A Fay. (Last Half) — Hans Hank* — Ward ft 
Dooley— York* ft Man. 

BUliKHfsELD CIRCUIT 



B1J*« (Ftoat Haif)-Th. Mclntyre* O oo lg ft 
Daffy— "A Corner la Hair" — Lanrsl Lea— Castiag 
Campbells— Date A Lillian. (Last Haln— RlaJt* 
ft launont— Hankal A May— Arthur Bdwarda ft C*. 
—Wayne. Marshsn A Ca ndy— Bngene Troupe 



LAaTHntO, _ 

Bl»» (Flrat Half ) —France* ft ghgaag «fla— 

XaVtn* ft Co.— Pearson Trio— WUUe Hill's CI re**. 

(Last Half)— Ths Mclntyraa— Anna Francla— "A 

laOaiW, MICH, 

SfcS < *S?„ H *i f '— *»"• * Wood—Dal* ft Boyle 
— "Olrla Win Be Glrle"— willing. samssVaT ft 
w. UUB f < iJ L »2J H-U)-Ooot. ft Dan>-Artbn7lav 
Tin* ft Co.— Pearson Trto— Casting n— T s T n. 

KEITH WXSTERW 

WTT.TTWQa) MOKT. 

>ai*k*ak (FBit Hair;— Uarmooy MlVl aaswatal 

BOBTR TABTBA, WISH. 

. ^ B ' in (First Half )—Nliun ft Sanns— Angal ft 
Fulls^-mrrr Watklns— Shrapnel Dodgsis^Stag- 

FOlTLAaTD. OBX 

B 3n po di e a >a (First Half)— Kayl* ft Ooyn*— Oon- 

rad A JenU-Thre. Besutles-Marker ASc^ack— 

Three Fishers. (Lest Half)— "Olrla of •«"— ale 

Blpon— "Dreamland"— t>e A Bennett— Bender ft 

BSwHs 

(Oontln ned on Page ST) 
IThii it met a Fact Ptadtri 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 20, 1919 



GUS HILL'S MINSTRELS 

DID YOU SEE 'EM? HAVE YOU HEARJ) 'EM ? THEY'RE A RIQT ! 

\v()ni>i-hi-:i;l show § | AiAHViiL()us mlsk: 

AGAIN THE MINSTREL KING SCORES A SONJG TRIUMPH! 



HERE ARE SOME 



rlE BACK" 



"SOMEDAY ;V(jI:'L 
"IIHiKS" (Jlv N!auKi 
. To Me) 
"YOC DIDN"] "WANT ME WHEN YOl: 

HAD ME" 
"ITS NH>1«)I)Y\S BC^INKSS BUT Jl\ 

ovv.v 

"KENTl'CKY DREAM" 

"WAIT AND y'EE"' Vshinimli- Fox Trot); 
TAHJAMAH' 
"HIMALAYA" 
"KINKY KOO" 
•IDA-TISHOMINCfQ & IXDIANOEA " 

•HONKYMOON" (Waltz) 



THEY'RE\ 
SINGING] 

STERN'S 
LATEST \ 

HITS! j 

Kvej'y ''one :i hnnhonK' : ; ," 
victory. . I{irc0r - essfgnlore|;: 

all '■'pu]jL'I'shed,ex(:'l , usi.v.ely -nx 



IN THE g AST 
fred freddy | 
rudy willing; 
bobbie weston 

LEE EDMONDS | , 

FRANK 'BRE^ANj 

H ERBE RT Hf I LI J SO N 

: JACK "KENNEDY ; 
EDDIE BRADY 
LEE EDMONDS 



CHICAGO, 11X- 
119 NO. I'l.AKK. ST. 

BOSTON 

1*1 TKEMONT ST. 



JOS. W. STERN & CO. 

1 02^4 West 38th Street, New York 



NEW YORK 

!ROFESSi'ONAL; DEPT. 
. 226 .WEST 4««k ST. 
OnD'oHilr' Nfw X.'V. 



RUTH BUDD 

This Week (Aug. 18) KEITH'S PALACE, New York 
Next Week (Aug. 25) KEITH'S BUSHWICK, Brooklyn 



Frank 



Charlie 



D'AMORE 



AND 



■ It 



UGLAS 



Have Been Honorably Discharged from Service 

THIS WEEK— KEITH'S RIVERSIDE, NEW YORK 

Next Week— Keith's Philadelphia. Open Palais Royal, New York, Sept 10. 

DIR. MORRIS & FEIL 



August. 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



STOCK AND7 REPERTOIRE 

(Continued (ram p«i» li.) 



W1NNEPEG COMPANY REOPENS 

Wi^kpeu. Can., Aug. 17.; — The Winni- 
peg flfernianant Players, of which 0. T. 
Howden is manager, have re-opened their 
fourteenth consecntiye season here at 'the 
Winnepes Theatre. .Only four Of the: Old 
favorites are. with . the company. John' 
Foster. is nssiatant manager and T. Bowers 
McDermott publicity manager.. The com- 
pany . includes r ' Thomas A. Magrane, di- 
rector: George Secord, assistant; Hazele 
Burgess and Jack Hoyden, leads ; Edna 
Earle Andrews, Fred Kirby, Jane Mau- 
rers, Bruce Elmore, Fred Cummings. 
George Earle, Marie Stuart and Walter 
Austman. - .. ' . . '. ; . 



SIGNS WITH COHAN * HARRIS 

Smythe Wallace, who, for the last sea- 
son, hag been heading his own stock com- 
pany in Salem and Brockton, Mass., has 
abandohed the enterprise and been engaged 
by Cohan and Harris for next season. 



WINTHROP RETURNING TO HALIFAX 

John Winthrop, who bag been playing 
leads with the Trent Theatre Stock Com- 
pany, in Trenton, N. J., is returning to 
the Majestic Players,. In Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, as leading mad. 



JOINS CLONINGER COMPANY 

s.u.t I.akk City, Utah, Aug. 17: — Mil- 
ton Goodliand is to be juvenile man with' 
the R'nlpb Clpninser. company here. ,.-;• 



BLANEYS LEASE THE PROSPECT 

; The Blaney interests have acquired the 
Prospect Theatre in the Bronx, formerly a 
Moss vaudeville house, and will present a 
popular ■company of players there, begin- 
ning Labor. Day. Many a last season's' 
Broadway' successes will ' be presented . 



CHICAGO NEWS 



SOTHERN SEEKING MEMBERS 

The first actual concerted move to secure 

■ members for the Actors' Co-operative As- 
sociation, was placed in motion here late 
this week when applications were given to 
every artist in Chicago for membership. 
This application is headed by Edward 
Hughes Southern's telegram, sent early 
this week to all' artists in Chicago, and 
it reads: "Will you join me and others 
of our calling in a new actors' organiza- 
tion for maintaining the dignity and bet- 
tering the condition of. the Amercan the- 
atre!" 

Beneath this, .with space • left for . the 
signatures ami addresses of the, players, 
is this brief statement: '" 

"I shall be pleased to join any organiza- 
tion for the purposes 'suggested in your 
letter." The words "any organization" 
are used, it is said, to "enable the players' 
to sign the- application i without binding 
themselves to join the particular organiza- 
tion being promoted by.Sothern. "Anyor- 
ganizatioir' is deciphered to mean any. or- 
ganization except the Actors' Equity Asso- 

■ ciation. 



PLAN NEW FILM THEATRE 

One of the largest motion picture the- 
atres in the world is to be erected at State 
and Lake streets, on the" site now occupied' 
by the Loop End Building and directly 
across the street from the Xew State Lake 
Theatre. It is said that negotiations for 
the site have been completed by a group 
. Of Chicagonians headed* by Morris Rosen- 
wald, and .that the house will be operated 
by Balaban and Katz. ■'■•;' g ' 

i;The new theatre, an L-shaped structure, 
•ill front sixty-eight feet on State street,' 
cross the alley from the Masonic Temple 
Building and 1 70 .'feet on Lake street. The 
site does not include the holding at the 
southeast corner of . State and Lake 
streets. The Lake street frontage is said 
to have been secured under a long-term 
'lease, but the State street frontage has 
■ been purchased by the promoters of the 
•theatre. ~ ■ ' ■"' ".. .'"''.. • :. 



TROUBLE IN WOOLFOLK SHOW 

There is trouble in the "Honeymoon 
Town" ghow'i and all billing matter con- 
nected with the production now bears the 
name of J. II. Blanehard in place of Boyle 
Woolfolk. Woolfolk. however, still .owns 
in the neighborhood of one-third of the pro- 
duction. ■ . - 

Blanehard is said to be one of .the 
heaviest backers of the piece, and took ex- 
ception to having to remain In the; dark.' 
The production is playing to good business 
at the. La Salle. 



COLORED DAILY FEATURES SHOWS 

A new colored daily paper called Thi- 
Whip, has made its -appearance on the 
South Side and taken a stand against the 
Defender,' another colored paper. The 
Whip caused quite some interest in the- 



atricals due to the fact that it is devoting 
an entire page to news of the profession. 
Many ,. artists and '.newspapermen are con- 
tributing to the new paper, which is al- 
ready winning a number of supporters, both 
among the colored, and white population of 
this city. 



CHANGES IN SHOW 

Albert Brown; formerly leading actor of 
"I .Love Xou," which '■ played an engage- 
ment here <it the Cort Theatre, will return 
to this city at the end of the month to act 
at the Princess Theatre in "Keep It to 
Yourself Arthur. Lipson will be a new 
member of the cast, replacing Macey Har- 
- Ian." Hortense Alden will take up the part 
formerly acted by Helen Holmes and Clara 
Mnekiii will succeed to the part created 
bj Ethel Standard.. 



ILLINOIS FAIR OPENS 

The gates of the Illinois State Fair 
opened at Springfield on Thursday playing 
to the biggest crowd in years.' The auto- 
mobile race, featuring Louis Disbrow, is 
drawing, quite gome attention. M. Davis 
is general manager of the fair this year. 
F. M. Barnes, of Chicago, has signed all 
the" vaudeville and circus acts with the ex- 
position. • 



PREPARED FOR STRIKES 

Izetta was removed from second position 
-on the Miller Theatre, Milwaukee, pro- 
gram last week, to next to closing, chang- 
ing positions with Walter James. The en- 
tire show of nine acts have been routed 
directly into the Rialto Theatre, Chicago, 
this week. It is thought that this move 
was made in case a strike should, close 
up all .theatres in this city, 

EXAMINE STAGE HAND'S SANITY 

.. Charles E; Penn, formerly a stage hand 
and recently discharged from the U. S. 
Army, has been arrested here and is being 
detained until his sanity is looked into. 
He was arrested in .the Planters Hotel, 
when, his peculiar actions caused the at- 
tention of police. 



ASCHERS GET THE CROWN 

- The Crown -Theatre reopened last: week 
as a movie -house under the auspices of 
the - Ascher Brothers. The Crown has 
proven a failure with every brand of en- 
tertainment, having played' vaudeville, 
dramatic, musical comedy and burlesque 
attractions. ..•■•• 



KEDZIE TO RUN VAUDE 

The Kedzie Theatre will reopen the last 
half of next week with vaudeville from 
the W. V. M. A. 



LORIN HOWARD INCORPORATES 
.The Lorin Howard Company has been 
incorporated for $2,500. The incorporators 
are Lorin Howard, Joseph W. Shaw and 
Joseph P. Eamea. '-'• - - 



THE GREATEST NEW SUCCESS OF THE YEAR 




A GONDOLA SONG 

. Vocal and Instrumental 

The Greatest Sensation of the West 

.. Send 15c. for one copy 
Professional copies and orchestration on request 

The Peter Medure Music House 

206 CENTER ST., HTBBING, MENN. 



WANTED 

FOR MARTINHO LOWANDE JR. CIRCUS 

Touring West Indies, Central and South America for one year or more. Big 
Animal Acts, Elephant Act, Trained Seal Act or Any Animal Act suitable for 
one ring show. Riders, with or without stock. Big Wire Act. Big; Acrobatic 
Act. Big Musical Act with 3. or 4 ladies. Troupe of Japs. Bar Performers. 
Spanish-speaking Clowns and a number of Double and Single Acts. Musicians. 
Boss Canvasman. Seat-men. Lightman. Workingmen in all departments. 
Address FRED. J. MARTINS, General Representative, 142 West 46th St., New 
York, N. Y., General Theatrical Exchange. 




TUBERCULOSIS 



It was when physicians said it 
was impossible for J. M. Miller, 
Ohio Druggist, to survive the 
ravages of Tuberculosis, he began 
experimenting on himself, and 
discovered the Home treatment, 
known as ADDILINE. Anyone 
is* rises* latest PMa w j tn coughs showing .tubercular 

tendency or Tuberculosis, may use it under plain directions. Send your name and 
address to ADDILINE, 38 Arcade Building, Columbus, Ohio. 



P 



LAYS - SKETCHES - ~ CTS 



and Exclusive Material. Liberal Terms 

■ W. f. KflSOl PUTWBIIX CO. 



WRITTEN TO ORDER. 
Up to the Minute Original 
Bookings Assured. Calf or write 

tfj 407, 508 fiia tot, far. KM St, I. j, 



MISS SUE OLMSTEAD 

Nicknamed in the A. E. F. as "Irresistible Sue" 



-" CALLAHAN BROS 



BOB 



EAST— LAURENCE SCHWAB 



WEST— C. W. NELSON 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 20, 1919 



=^1 



ANNOUNCEMENT TO MANAGERS 



" " 



" 



■- . - i - 




44 



FORMERLY OF COLE AND JOHNSON 
••* ■ The Originators of Syncopated Songs. Offering a New Act 

SYNCOPATION 

WITH 
EARL BTJMFORD, Tenor, Bandolin, Drums. 
EDDIE RANSOM, Baritone, Piano. 
PETE ZABRISKJE, Bass, Banjo-Guitar. 
P TAYLOR GORDON, Solo Tenor, Bandola. 

WILLIE BUTLER, Violin. 

NO W under the personal direction of M. S. Bentham — Palace Theatre 



99 



■ "... - 



• ■ 



- - - 






■■■:'■ •■■• ■ . 



WANTED 

PROFESSIONAL MAN (Act Getter) 

Representative home wants good man. All communica- 
tions confidential. Address "K. Y;," care of New York 
Clipper, 1604 Broadway, New York. 



UNION ELECTRICIAN 

Preference given to one who can play parts. A Business Repre- 
sentative and Experienced Repertoire People. All week stand in 
best eastern time. CHAS. H. ROSSKAM, Mgr., Chicago Stock 
Co^ address for two weeks, 225 Front St, "Lakemont," Altoona, Pa. 



IN 



DRAWING POPULATION OVER 300,000 





ULVI 



PATERSON'S PERFECT THEATRE, PATERSON, N. J. 

Capacity 1900. Playing only Legitimate Attractions First Three days and 
Popular Price Shows the Last Three Days. For open time apply to 



WANTED QUICK 

for the URBIN STOCK COMPANY, General Business Man and 
Comedian. Address FRANK URBIN, Bucksport, Maine. ■ . 

DO YOU WANT A PROSPEROUS SEASON? 

If So, Get in Touch With Us at Once. We want 10 Musical Tab. Shows for 
New England. Open at once BREWSTER AMUSEMENT CO., 230 Tremont 
St., Boston, Mass. 



Positively 

the Only 

HINDU 

Telepathy 

Act In 
America 



JOYEDMH 

DIRECTION— MAX GORDON 



THE 
MASTER 
MYSTIC 

Always 
Working 



August 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



MOtimnrao. on> 

apl— (First Bait) — Morria Sisters — 
fttnm * Aleiande r — Gray * Jackso n Bmlrt l * 
t. w t»r — Three Maeka. (Last MB afusasinn 
* Vsnce— Miller * King— aeaataaaBaBg W 

jiU ft Purl Hall— Fondelli Trio. - 
BXATTLX, WASH, 
rilif Wlrrpirtlrtrmt (First Halt) — Mabel Fonda 
Irlo— Debome -ft Kllla — Murray ft Papkova— Sid 
L* wis— Fire "■grhtcna. (Lea t Half ) —Billy Wol- 
rs»t— Becker a Dama— Hawthorne Minstrels — Bob 
wilte— Comalli ft WUbnr. >r< 

awn wai3l 

Hippodrome (First Bait) — "Glrla of 'SI" — Alt 
aipca — "Dreamland" — Lee ft Bennett— Bander ft 
hut. (Last Half)— Mabel Fonda Trio— Caters* 
a Blls — Murray ft Papkora — Bid Lewis — Flva 

Nlrbtona. 

TAafCOVTVZB, B. o. 

Columbia (First Bait) — Billy Wolgast— M> 
4 Adams — Hawthorne Minstrels — Bob White — 
Oornalla ft Wilbur. (Last Half)— Jition ft Senna 
—Anarel ft Fuller — Shrapnel Dodgers — Singing 
Trio— Harry Wataana. 

WALLA WALLA. WASH. 

Libsrty (First Half)— The Puppetts— Stratford 
Comedy Four — Can Aheern. (Last Half)— Har- 
awny Malda — Soanlah Trio — Wright ft Davis — 
Sylvia atom ft Co. — "Woman." 

W. V. M. A. CIRCUIT 

TrgV.r.lE lJ 1 1 -V.W VTT- 

Washington (First Half)— Womatt ft Mullen— 
Miller ft Lyle, (Last Halt) — Hector — Bams ft 
Wilson — Degnon ft Clifton. 

CHICAGO. ILL 

American (First Half)— Franda ft PiUllppa— 
Fields ft Forrest — Pat ft Peggy Hooltaa — "Cheer 
De" — Clay CToncn — Bell's Hawaiian*. (Last Bait) 
— Smith ft Keefe— Two Knehna — Cantor's Minstrel 
atlases — Davey Manley. i 

Xedsla (Last Half)— Samaxoff ft Bonis— Dorotliy 
Vsognn— J. 0. Mack ft Co. 

Hippodrome (Last Half)— Three Killarney Qlrls 
—Mew .Leader— Arthur De Toy ft Co. — Marietta's 




WMBPW eV ILLS., CASADA. 
Btrand (Flnt Halt)— Three Bot» and a Girt. 
(Last Bait) — Sherman ft Boee — Bertie Fowler — 
Hash, Xack ft George. 

pantages circuit 

WDTsTrPEO, "«,waTia 
Wolfe ft Patterson— W. B. Whittle— Kilkenny 
Foot — Tenan — Amoros ft Jeannette — Three ftertoa, 
BBBXsTA ABB USXASOOsT. nawAiiA. 
Four Leone— Frank. Ward — Qnigley Q. aTlta- 
gerald — Dance Fantasy — Dunbar ft Tomer — 
Temptation. 

uaatOa rT O aT. OiaTiTtn, 
Boueaetti Troose — Stan ft Mac Laurel — Bevue De 
Vague— Lone ft Ward— Fritehle. 

niT/i isT ffawarta 
O. H. Teddy— Frank Paso — J. Bwayn* Gordon 
ft Co. — Georgia Howard — Three lissom. 

OBXAT FALLS aOP HXLXVft, atOHT. 
Oh. Billy— Hall ft Shapiro— Toe Boberta— Mc- 
Lean ft Co. — Stagpole ft spier — Mosarta. 
BUTTE. afOBT. (F0UU DAYS), AWAOOSDA 
AXD MTSSOTTLA (OBX DAT). 
Honeymoon Inn — Shaw ft Bernard) — Makareaka 
Duo — Marry Livingston — Austin ft Delaney — Bials. 
SPOKAJTE, WASH. 
Cyeno Japa — Clyde Cook — Venetian Gypsies— 
Sllber ft North— Lady Alice's Pets— La Petite 
BIT a. . 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Golden- Troupe — Marie Fltxglbbon — Le Grobs — 
Chlaholm ft Breen — Panama Trio — Lorscb ft 



OOBSI, UTAH. 

Scbeppa Comedy Cl K.u a A llbei Lloyd— 8a maroat 
— Josephine, Darts— Cook ft T nr s r ai T oo tsa Sep- 
tette. 

Taat raT g W^ _ OOLO. 

Helen Jackley— Fay ft Jack Smith— Kajly ems— 
Hager* Ooodwln— Rhode ft " ■— - 



VABOOU VBat. B. C. 
Jerrie Barn — Ad Wohlman— Porter J. Walt* ft 

Co.— Anita Allan— Canfleld ft B oea Morak sisters. 
'■'.I. VICTORIA, B. O. 

Little Lajabe— Better Brothers— Bay Caa ttn— 
Imperial Quintette — Bay ft Emma Dean— Two 
Romanoff. Sisters. 

TOOOsLA, WASH. 
The Shattocke — Bobble Benabaw — GUrern 
Dancers — Rial to Quartette— Joe Jackson — Day lord 
ft Berroo, 

PORTLAND, ORE. 
"Bar Lett Shoolder" — Florence Bayseld— - 
Zleiler Twins ft Co.— Angel ft Fuller— Ball ft 
Bra. 

BAH raAWCTBOO. OAL. 
Broalus ft Brown — Dorothy Lewis — Biehard tna 
Great — Hello. People. Hello — Ball ft West — 
Stewart ft OUre. 

OaaTT.airr). OAL. 
Booth ft Leander— Lawrence ft Bdwards— Beroe 
de Loxe — Leray ft Diesmi rilmiisie Minstrels— 
Harris ft Noland— Singer's MldgeU. 
LOB aUtSsSLZS. war. 
Amoros ft Obex — Betty Brooks — Lots ft Lota- 
Meyers ft Weaaer — Bert Melrose — Sons * Dance 
Berne. 

BaUT DXZOO, OAL. 
Diaz ft Monks— Nsdell ft Pollette— CUft Clark 
— Leila Shaw ft Co. — Umpire Quartette — Joe 
Fenton ft Co. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, 
Monroe ft Grant — Sam ft Ada Beverly — Four 
Bennees— Joe Darcy — Kelly Field Players. 



GOING INTO ROAD SHOW 

Chatatjqtja, N. T.. An*. 16. — Raymond 
WsJburn, who was leading man for The 
Pauline MacITeaa Stock Company dnrinj 
its eight weeks' run here, leaves the com- 
pany when it closes twlgnt, to proceed to 
Mew York, where he la to rehearse with 
Florence Reed in "Roads of Destiny." 



THEATRE 
WANTED 

Wanted to Leas*— A Theatre 
fully equipped for Moving Pic- 
tures, and Stage large enough for 
Road Shows in a town over 10,- 
000. Seating capacity most be 
over 800. Write or wire 8AM 
SCHLUP, Bos 264, Cambridge, 
Ohio. 



Uaoem (Last Half)— Francis ft PhlWpps— Fields 
A Forrest — Pat ft Peggy Hoolton — "Cheer Up" — 

Hugo Lotgena— Bell's Hawaiian*. 

DATKBTfOBT, IOWA, 

Colombia (First Half)— The Sterlings— Virginia 
Belles — Warner ft Palmer — Deltas. Wardens ft 
Delton. (Last Halt) — LUllan'e Dogs— Harry Long- 
don ft Co.— Britt Wood— Mian Babble Oordone. 
DEOATTm, ILL, 

Empress (First Halt) — Lucy Gillette ft Co.— 
Bulle ft Dot— McLaln, Gates ft Co.— "Cabaret de ' 
Luxe." (Last Halt)— Chief Little Elk ft Co. — 
Chick ft Tiny Barrey — Betty Fredericks ft Co.— 
Conway ft Fields — Frear, Baggett ft Freer. 
DTTLTJTH, atTJTS*. 

Bew Omad (First Halt)— Fredericks ft Van— 
"Her Tronssean" — Orpheus Comedy' Four — Sose, 
tins ft Boee. (Last Half) — Kenny, Mason ft 
Sesoll — Harris ft Lyman — Douglas Graves ft Co.— 
Dsyle ft Elaine. 

EAST ST. LOuTB, ILL. 

Erber*a (Flnt Half) — Folsom ft Brown — Wilson 
ft Wilson— Golden Bird. (Last Halt)— Kremka 

Brothers — Black ft O'Donnell. 

EVAsTBVXLXX. 

Hew Sraad (First Half)— Bosie Bide ft Co.— 
Brlerre ft King — Minnie Stanley ft Co. — Gene 
Greene^ — Powell Troupe. (Last Halt) — Lawton — 
Orren ft Drew — Betelle ft Bert Gordon — Bight 
▼aaaar Glrla — Gene Greene — Three U elrin Brothers. 
GRANITE CTTT, ILL, 

Waailngtoa (Sunday Only) — La Sova ft Ollmore 
— Neal AbeL (Monday, Three)— Musical Dewltta 
—Burns ft Wilson. (Thursday. Three) — Howard 
ft Scott— La Boas ft Lane. 

mmnrrr»PQUB, unm. 

Saw Grand — Three Nalos — Keno Keys ft Melrose. 

Sew Palace (First Half) — Bobbie Barker ft 
Stndlo Girls— Odlva. (Last Half)— Pantsar Duo 
-OdlTS. 

ST. LOTTTB, MO. 

OolumHa (First Halt) — Hector — Hanington ft 
Mills— La Sova ft Gil more— Cameron ft Kennedy. 
(Lest Halt)— Golden Bird— Miller ft Lyle. 

BlaltcTTPlret Bait)— Black ft O-Donnen— Han ft 
O'Brien— Chic ft Tiny Harvey— Anna Vivian 'ft Co. 
(Last Halt)— Wilson ft Wilson— McLaln. Gates ft 
Co. — Cameron ft Kennedy. E 

Grand— Crystal. Bell— Burden ft Burden — Lucky 
a lost— Leroy ft Harvey— La Pearl BlondeU ft 
Co.— Barry ft Lelghton. 

Skydrome (Flrat Halt) — Howard ft Scott — 
Bavaria Dso. (Last Half)— Ho watt ft Mullen- 
Hall ft O'Brien — Klotlng's Animals. 
ST. PAT/L, aaaatat, 

Xew Palace (Flrat Half)— Fastser Duo— Ferro ft 
Coulter. (Last Bait) — Davis ft Castle — Bobble 
Barker ft Stndlo Girls— Weir ft King. 
BPBJHOrrFJ.D, HO. 

atajeatlo (First Halt) — Kremka Brothers— Beck 
* Stone — "Onr Family" — Elutlng's Bntertalnera. 
(Last Halt) — Fulton ft Mack — B1U> Miller ft Co.— 
Oay Crouch — Princess »■'■"" ft Co. 
SOUTH BEND. IHD. 

Orpheaaa (First Half)— Samaroff ft Sonla— Burke 
A E ngli sh — James H. Cullea — George BflsaaSatar Sl 
BawaUaBa. (Last Half) — Jeannetta falllrls CeBt 
ton ft Lennlae. - ■ 

- BUPBIUOB, WTfl. 

New Palace (Flnt Halt) — Kenny, Mason ft 
Schol] — Harris ft Lyman — Douglas Graves ft Co. — 
Doile ft Elaine. (Last Salt)— Fredericks ft Van 
— "Ber Tuiiiaasao*' — Orpheus Comedy Four — Rose, 

EUls ft Boee. 

^rwwww ira iiTr Xjrj), 

Hippodrome (First Halt) — Lawton — Orren ft 
Drew — Neal Abel — Bight Vaaaar Girls — Satan* 
A Bert Gordon— Three Meitln Brotaers. (last 
Half) — Bosie Bifle — Brlerre ft King— Minnie Stan- 
ley ft Co. — Powell Troupe. . 



mm 




(This u not a Fact Powirr) 



A LETTER FROM AN ARTIST TO A PUBLISHER 

(LE JONGLEUR SUPERBE) 



a 



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Aug. a, i9i9, r 



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B.t D. v Nice & Co... 
1544 Broadway,. 
New York City. 

Gentlenen: 



Uusie i s so e s b ent i al to my ' ' 
act and when I get two numbers like "Tents 



7v 



of Arabs" and "Romance" I think I ought 
"60 write you a word of praise. 

I can t say more than they are 
•ronderful. Thanking you for submitting 
them to me> 

• ■ -v - ■." ■- 

Best wishes, 






~' . 



'•%:-•-'■ ^. ^ 



'' Tours very truly, • 



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B.D. NICE «& CO. 






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By LEE DAVID 

: Music Publishers 



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1544 Broadway 






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THE N E W YORK CLIPPER 



August 20, 1919 



jjftn ; :. 




RICH "SHORTY" 







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• "v i . ■■'."■ 



• -..■: 



IM O 

HARRY T, 



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With "Step Lively Girls" Columbia Theatre, N. Y., Week of Aug 25 



CALL CALL 

All people engaged for 

Jimmy James 'G rls From Jazzland" 

will kindly report for rehearsal at once at BROSI HALL, 568 Ninth 
Ave., between 41st and 42nd Streets, New York. 

CAN USE A FEW MORE GOOD CHORUS 

GIRLS 

BEST SALARIES TO THE BEST GIRLS 



B. K. KAHN'S 

UNION SQUARE THEATRE 

^ of 6 BURLESQUE TALENT season 

MONEY NO OBJECT FOR RIGHT PEOPLE 

"The Best Is None Too Good" 

We get the money and are willing to spend it. Permanent New 
York City engagement. Road salaries for good Chorus Girls. Six 
days a week— no Sunday shows. 



♦John MacKinnon 



JUVENILE— TENOR 



EDMOND HAYES* OWN SHOW 



CALL 



NOTICE 

All people engaged for 



CALL 



TOM COYNE'S FRENCH BABIES CO. 



•KM 



WITH BILLY WILD 



^ t Rehearsing at Teschmacher's Casino, 618' 9th Ave., corner 44th St. 

MATT KENNEDY JACK RICH MONA FAY 

ED. HULSON FLORENCE BURNS DAINTY MAY BELLE 
GEO. BENTLEY LOUISE ROSE EVA LEWIS 

PLAYING NATIONAL BURLESQUE CIRCUIT . 

Chorus Girls wanted. Best salaries paid, everything furnished. Railroad ' 
I fares paid both ways. Acknowledge call, Room 801, Columbia Theatre Bldg. 



ERNEST MACK VERA HENNICI 



Eccentric Singing and Dancing 
Comedian 



Singing and Dancing Soubrette 
GROWN UP BABIES 
KAHN'S UNION SQUARE 
See ROEHM A RICHARDS 



FLORENCE DEVERE 



SOUBRETTE 



SWEET SWEETIE CURLS 



ETHEL DEVEAUX 



SOUBRETTE 



HASTINGS RAZZLE DAZZLE OF Ml* 



LORETTA AHEARN 

DAINTY SINGING AND DANCING SOUBRETTE— ILMMW DOLLS 



FLORENCE WHITFORD 



SOUBRETTE JAZZ BABBIES 



August 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



LEDERER, FRANCIS AND 
MACKAY PUT PEP INTO 
UNION SQUARE SHOW 

Leo Stevens, who Is putting on the books 
at Kahn'a Union Square, gave the patrons 
of that house the kind of a show they like 
last week. The first part was called "Oh, 
You Married Men" with "At the Fair" as 
the burlesque. Both were good comedy 
hills and the comedians got many laughs. 

The scenery and effects were well put on 
and the girl's costumes looked pretty. Solly 
Fields put on some attractive numbers. 

The comedy in the first part was In the 
hands of Frank Mackey, Lew Lederer and 
James X. Francis. Mackey did an eccentric 
comedy part and handled It very well. He 
works fast and humored his scenes. Mackey 
made several changes of wardrobe. Led- 
erer, -who worked opposite Pat White last 
season on the American Circuit, opened at 
this house last week. He did not have very 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued from page 11) 



much to do in the first part, stood out in 
the second, working up the scenes with 
Mackey for many laughs. Francis did an 
elderly character as one of the husbands 
opposite Mackey in the first part, and car- 
ried it off nicely. Billy Hoberg was the bit 
man. He was in a number of scenes and 
did well. 

Ruth Rolling, wearing : three gowns that 
were very classy In quality and design, 
looked stunning In each. This young lady 
has set a pace for wardrobe which will be 
hard for other women to follow. It Is said 
that her three gowns last week were worth 
nearly 91,000. Miss Rolling is improving in 
her work. Her Chinese number was a suc- 
cess, as well as the "Lonesome" number. 

Grace Howard la fast becoming a great 
favorite here. She has a moat pleasing 
personality and manages to appear in sev- 



eral new dresses each -week. Her wardrobe 
was very pretty last week. She was In many 
scenes and easily held her end up. She 
reads lines nicely and her numbers were 
appreciated on Wednesday afternoon. 

Michelina Perineal had no trouble in tak- 
ing care of herself and, as one of the wives, 
she did nicely. She read her lines well and 
put her numbers over. Her wardrobe looked 
well from the front. 

"Babe" Wellington again danced herself 
Into favor in her numbers and put them 
all over for encores. She also did very well 
as one of the wives. Her "Say it Again" 
number was liked as was the "Cotton 
Town" number.. Miss Wellington's cos- 
tumes became her. "Babe" Qulnn did a 
bell hop In a lively fashion. 

The first part told a story of two men 
trying to get rid of their wives In order to 



have a good time with a couple of girls 
they had met at the beach. They-succeeded 
in getting their wives away for a short 
time but the latter returned and caught 
them. The husbands then had to do a lot 
of lying in order to square themselves. The 
1 boys worked up the comedy situations very 
well. I^ederer had a pantomime drunk scene 
with four girls in which one of them drug- 
ged his drink and they all helped rob him 
of his money and jewelry. It was well done 
and Lederer did not overdo the part. 

Gara Zora appeared at the close of the 
first act in ■ classic snake dance that she 
did moat gracefully. It was uncanny but 
.most fascinating. 

Some real good comedy bits were offered 
In the burlesque. The drink bit or Mackey 
and Lederer, as well as snake bit offered 
by Lederer and Miss Pennette, were very 
amusing. The "bookmaker" bit, with Fran- 
cis as the bookmaker, and Mackey and Led- 
erer as the betters, proved a good comedy 
scene and was .nicely worked up. There 
were a number Of other good scenes that 

went over big. — Sid. 



FRANK X. SILK 

ORIGINAL 

"ATTA BOY HORACE" 

FEATURED WITH THE "JAZZ BABIES" ON THE AMERICAN BURLESQUE CIRCUIT 






Transcript 
"Funniest hobo in burlesque."— Mark Mason. 

OLYMPIC, NEW YORK, THIS WEEK 



Clipper— Jan. 1, 1919 

"A most versatile comedian." — Sro. 



TROCADERO, PHILADELPHIA, NEXT WEEK 



r i v 





IM 



CLARK 



"\A/ O \A/" 

PRODUCER "JAZZ BABIES," OLYMPIC, NEW YORK, THIS WEEK 



, • ■ 'I 








. ■ 

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'"". ". 



SEE US AT THE TROCADERO, PHILADELPHIA, NEXT WEEK 



,. 



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'■ .....,JMM»M»>M»»>, '„..„.«..»„'. :.;J..J..MM»»M?MJy..:.; ... 'SSSSt^ 



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THIS SPACE * LEW LEDERER 
RESERVED BY KAHN'S UNION SQUARE 


m&r RUTH ROLLING m 


soubrette B E TTY RAL.tVI&lR liSti 


soubrette BABE De PALMER "WBKF- 



DOING STRAIGHT 



WITH JACOBS AND JERMON'S BURLESQUE REVIEW 



SHIRLEY MALLETTE 



A Southern Soubrette New tn the East. Signed with 



sad Fraaklyn lor Next 



In, mue Soubrette— SLIDING BILLY WATSON SHOW— Season 1*1»-1«2» 
MANAGEMENT ROEHM end RICHARDS 



WITH PACEMAKERS 



MANACEMENT-HERK. KELLY * DAMSEL 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



August 20, 1919 



LEW FREY 



FROM OVER THERE 

On the L — Tlni ThataVs to C»o. SafUnald 



DuNORD 



In a Classic Dancing Oddity 

DIRECTION— TOM JONES 



CHONG 



SINGER AND 
INSTRUMENTALIST 

The Only Chine** Yodeler in the World 
SPECIAL SCENERY DIRECTION TOM JONES GORGEOUS COSTUMES 



THOMAS P. JACKSON & CO. 

"ONCE A THIEF" 

By LAURENCE GRATTAN IN VAUDEVILLE 



GERTRUDE MORGAN 

The Happy Little Miss 

DIRECTION— MARINELU 



JOSEPHINE 



WILCOX— LaCROIX & CO. 

Now Doing New Act— "COLD COFFEE" 

By CHAS. HOKWITZ DIRECTION-LAWRENCE SCHWAB 



JACK GARDNER 



In Pictures for die Summer 



LOOK US OVER < 

JOHN & NELLIE OLMS 

The Watch Wizards 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



BELLE 



EVELYN 



MONSELLE & WHITESTONE 



SaBjfiAf and Piiao 



la Vauderflle 



AILEKN 



LE ROY & HARVEY 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



ALTHOFF SISTERS 



TWO COILS AND THE PIANO 



DIRECTION-HARRY WEBER 



CIij»j9< 



.-■ 




la m ilsi to avoid nrlstalras and to insure the precept Mtw> of tfco latest* ad i arias id 
la tWo list, a P06TAL CARD mint bo seat requ— tin* a. to tawwd r— ■ tettar. It aaaat 
bo sesaad with, roar (oil nam. mod Uv. «!!■■ to nbltb tbo latter U to bo mm*. and tbe 
liao of IimI followed by tbo tender ahoutd be rnirlnaeil 


Pleeao BBssBJsaa tbo doto 
wore ooVortleod. 


(or mimbw ) «f 


the CLIFFER 


In which tbo letters eent tor 


AlMo, Ton 
Ajuitiacc Clyde 
Brave. Mr. 
Bsaneky. A. 
Bakkr, Bm 
Brent, E. B. 
Croei, Harry 


Camrt. Great 
Cattle, Ju. 

DaDfortb, C. R 
Down. We C 

ruber, Harry 
Yennson, Jot. 
GUajov, Ju. 


HUTCf, X Cn-V- 

enca __■ 
HsjTlnftaG, E, B. 
Kaoxn. Mitt 
Kelso, joe 
Klnfubo, Ltroy 
Karle, ADen 


Lew*. An* 
UtBriiStTBtny 

■mat. flee P. 

ateEoxo. Ed A 
Mlltoo, sober. 
MoBtseaay, 
Marshall 


Newton, Harry tjterwut, Hart 

AiMoe M. 
CDiit, We. Bamna, Wn. R 
0ir*r. Ota Shorten. Al 
■oar, J»ct Wolfe, Barney 
trior. R . ■ 






LAWS 




MB mlrtre, Curlt 
Borland. BeDs 
Clerelmd, Basel 
Clifford. Gats; 
Cardwtll, Mm 
colioo. Jeans C 


Deri*. Lea* 
Dolaner. Mende 

Dm-, BBb 
Beaitr. Bay 

noode, Jons 
Fowler.* Edeaa ■ 


rvnan, Cntt 

onbat A SReee* 
• Hope, Pony 
HiHs. Anne 


Kiln. Flo 
labor, Hataort 
Loan, Hood W. 

MKcsen. Dare 
.Mtthen. Iran 


ItaOor, Berne EnaseU, Vie 
Norrts, Aon Benter. rem 

Oataa. Katbettee Pi bra, rasps 

rnsud. CurdEe Banrajt, Br» 
Ha. Irhsle IMgat, Mrs. Joe 



WANTED QUICKC COLUMBIA STOCK CO. 

Mob for Juvenile* end General Boilneee, also Man for Light ComcdV and General Bnaln— a. 
All photos returned. No specialties. Year's work to the right party. State what yon expect 
' to get, not what you want, for yon set' it here. Chae. Ludwig wire. Week stands in Opera 
Houses, Delaware and Maryland. Address WM. KRALCE, Mgr. Ocean City, Maryland. 



ALVINO DUO 



Jazz Without Jarrs 



500 Fifth Ave, N. Y. C 



DEATHS IN THE PROFESSION 



HARRY (VIOLET) HUDSON, for many 
years well known theatrically In- Louis- 
ville. Kentucky, aB a stage manager. He 
managed the Buckingham, the Avenue and 
Bryant theatres. He was also a bartender 
and a member of the T. M. A. and the 
Eartenders' union. He was flfty-ona y ears 
old and Is . survived by his wife and two 
sons. 

MRS. MEYER COHEN, wife of the well 
known music publisher, died at her home 
In New York on Tuesday, Aug. 5th. after 
a long Illness. The end was audden and 
In spite of her previous condition, unex- 
pected. The burial took place at her sum- 
mer home in Purdy, N. Y. Her husband 
and a married daughter survive her. 

JOHN A. WILKES,' (or fifty yearn wen 
known as a tragedian on the English and 
American stage, died suddenly . last week ... 
at the Self Masters Colony, New. Jersey, at 
the age of eighty. He was born in Ire- 
land and became well known at the time 
when Booth and Barrett were famouB. He 
was a member of the Actors Order of 
Friendship. . '_*- 

LOUISE ARNOT, an actress known In' 
private life as Mrs. Mary Louis Gurm. died 
last week at the age of seventy-six. She 
was the last of the Marsh Troupe of child 
performers that toured the United States 
in the '50b. She played leading male parts 
at the age of 12, as she had a very deep 
voice. 

JAMES E. McBRIDE, connected with the ' 
Fox Film Corporation, and formerly a 
member of the Globe and the New York 
American staffs, died last week at his 
homo at 249 West End Avenue. He was 
at one time president of the Municipal 
Civil Service Commission, appointed by 
Mayor Hyhvn. 

SYDNEY JAMES, who with C. Watkln 
Knight, conducted The Strollers Bureau, 
of 152 Burton Road, Derby, and who was 
well known as a concert artist, died in 
Karachi, India, on July 16, from acute peri- 
tonitis. He was a member of the * Variety 
Artistes Federation, of London. 



JOE ALI, musical director of Hurtlg and 
Seamon's Theatre, died at his home in 
New York last Saturday night of pneumo- 
nia after an illness of two weeks. He was 
sixty-eight years of age. 

All bad been leader for the Hurtlg and 
Seamon firm for twenty-one years. He 
was at the old Music Hall before the pres- 
ent new house opened. Frank Fantile, who 
has been his assistant for years, succeeded 
him as leader. 

MRS. MARY L. QUINN, who had been on 
the stage for forty years .previous to her 
retirement, died last week at her home at 
241 West Thirteenth Street. New . York. 
She was seventy-six years of age. jL •--. 

CHARLES ROCK, one of the best known 
and versatile of English actors, died: at his 
.home near London last week, after a pain- 
ful Illness. He was fifty- four years of age 
and well known In dramatic and film circles. 
He was a faithful charity worker also, and 
was burled in Maryelbone Cemetery, East 
Fincley. 

SAM BENNETT, known to the theatrical 
world ae one of The Musical Bennetts and 
recently as "The Great Barnette." died 
last week at his home in Brooklyn, after 
a brief Illness. He was fifty-one years of 
age, and had been appearing upon the stage 
since he was seventeen. He was a well 
trained musician, a member of the Elks, 
Masons, T. M. A., and "The White Rats." 
He had appeared all over this country and 
Europe. He is survived by his brother, 
Ned. 

J. L. ORAYDON, one of the directors of 
the Palace Theatre, London, died on Satur- 
day at the age of seventy-six. Mr. Gray- 
don was for more than forty years the man- 
ager of the old Middlesex Music Hall. 
known as the "Old Mo." It was under his 
direction that Dan Leno, G. H. McDe'rmott, 
George Leyboume and many others became 
well-known stars. The "Old Mo" was 
changed into the Winter Garden when It 
was rebuilt in 190$. At that time he re- 
tired from the Middlesex Music Hall. 



CHAS. GERARD 



One Arm 

Piaiie Novelty 

DirectiBB— AB FSUtBMG 



August 20, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 





DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 



Route* Must Reach This Office Not Later 
Than Saturday 

"At 9:46" — Playhouse. New York. Indef. 

"Ansel Face" — Colonial. Chicago. Indef. 

"Better "Ole" — Mr. and Mrs. Coborn — Booth. 
N. Y. City. Indef. •_ 

"Boys Will be Boys"— Ford's. Baltimore. 
Md. Aug. 18-25. 

"Buddies" — Park Sq., Boston, Mass.. Indef. 

"Breakfast In Bed" — Plymouth, Boston. 
Indef. 

"Cappy Ricks" — Cort. Chicago. I1L. Indef. 

"Chu Chin Chow" — Century. New York, 
(Closed by strike.) 

"The Challenge"— Selwyn, New York City. 
(Closed by strike.) 

"Crimson Alibi" — Broadhurst, New York, 
Indef. (Closed by strike.) 

Carmelo's Ted. Musical Comedy Co. — Rex, 
Omaha, Neb., Indef. 

"Civilian Clothes"— National, Wash.. D. C 
18-23. 

"East Is West" — Astor, New York City, 
Indef. 

"Every Woman" — Shubert-Garrick, Wash- 
ington. D. C. Aug. 17-22. 

"Five Million, The" — Lyric, New York 
City, Indef. (Closed by actors' strike.) 

Greenwich Village Follies — Greenwich Vil- 
lage. N. Y., indef. 

"Gaieties of 1919 — 44th St.. New York 
City. (Closed by actors' strike.) 

"Honeymoon Town" — La Salle, Chicago, In- 
def. 

"John Ferguson" — Fulton, New York City, 
indef. 

"Lightnto' " — Gayety, New York City, in- 
def. (Closed by actors* strike.) 

"Listen Lester" — Knickerbocker. New York 
City. (Closed by strike.) 

"La La, Lucille"— Henry . Miller's, New 
York City, Indef. 

"Lonely Romeo" — Shubert, New York, In- 
def. 

"Look Who's Here" — National. Wash., D. 

C, 25-SO. 
"Midnight Whirl" — Century, New York 

City. 
"Monte Cristo, Jr." — Winter Garden, New 

York City. 
"Nighty Night"— Princess, New York City. 
Aug. 7, indef. (Closed by-actors' strike.) 
O'Hara Flake — Olympic, Chicago, Aug. 18- 

28. 
"On the Hiring Line" — Blackstone, Chicago, 
Aug. 25, Indef. 

"Ob, What a Girl" — Shubert, New York, 

(Closed by strike.) 
"Oh, My Dear" — Wilbur. Boston, Indef. 
"Peek-a-Boo" — Central, N. Y., Indef. 
"Passing Show of 1918" — Palace, Chicago. 

(Last two weeks.) . * 
*3oyal Vagabond. The" — Cohan & Harris. 

New York City. (Closed by strike.) 
"Scandal" — Garrlck, Chicago, Indef. 
"She's a Good Fellow" — Globe, New York 

City, indef. (Closed by actors' strike.) 
"Scandals of 1919"— Liberty, New York 

City. Indef. 
"See-Saw" — Tremont, Boston, Mass., indef. 
"Three Wise Fools" — Power's, Chicago, 

Aug. 21, Indef. 
"Those Who Walk in Darkness"-^48th St., 

New York City. (Closed by strike.) 
"Take It From Me" — Studebaker, Chicago, 

indef. 
"Thirty-nine East" — Maxlne Elliott. New 

York City. (Closed by strike.) 
"Up In Mabel's Room" — Wood's, Chicago, 

Dl., indef. :■•■-. 

Uncle Tom's Cabin Co. — Ft, Wayne; Ind. 22, 

Lima 23.. Akron 25-26, Canton 27-28, 

Youngstown 29-30. • - , ,- 

"Voice in the Dark. A" — Republic. New 

York. (Closed by strike.) 
"Zlegfeld Follies" — New Amsterdam. 

(Closed by strike.) 

,' STOCKS 

Albee Stock, Providence, R. I., indef. 
Arlington Theatre Co. — Boston, Mass., in- 
def. ■ 
Alcaxax Players — Alcaxar San Francisco, 

SB 

Baker Players — Portland, Ore., indef. 

Blaney Stock— Yorkvllle, New York City. 

Belgrade, Sadie— New Bedford, Mass.. indef. 

Beasey. Jack. Stock— Peoria, 111., Indef. 

Briasac, Virginia, Stock — Strand, San Diego. 
CaL, indef. 

Brown, George, Stock — Whalen Park, Fltch- 
burg, Mass., indef. 

Booth, Nellie, Players— Pittsburgh, Pa., in- 
def.-.." 

Brown ell- Stock— Dayton, O., indef. 

Byers, Fred, Stock — Waverly. N. Y., indef. 

Chicago, Stock — Altoona,' Pa., Indef. 

Crawford. Ed., Stock— Bath. Me.. Indef. 

Colonial Stock— PI ttsfleld. Mass Indef. 

Colonial Stock — Cleveland, O., indef. 

Dominion Players — Winnipeg, Manitoba, 
Can., indef. 

Durkln Stock — Skowhegan, Me., indef. ' 

Desmond, Mae, Players— Scranton, Fa., in- 
def. ""•-../ '■ 

Del Lawrence Co. — Majestic, San Francisco, 
CaL, indef.- - ;..— . - ■.'.>••.. 



Enterprise Stock Co.— Green Bay, Wis., in- 
def. ■• • 
Forest Park Musical Stock— St. Louis, Mo. 

Grand Theatre Stock Co.— Tulsa, Okla., in- 
def. 

Gardner Bros. Stock Co. — Palace, Oklahoma. 
City. Okla., Indef. _ , . ■• 

Glaser, Vaughan, Musical Stock — Cleveland. 
O.. indef. . . 

Hunt's Musical Stock— Boston, Mass., indef. 

Howard-Lorn Stock — National, Bnglewood. 
HL, tadef. . . ' 

Hawkins-Webb Co. — Regent. Muskegon, 
Mich., indef. _ 

Hawkins-Webb Co. (2)— Powers, Grand 
Rapids. Mich.. Indef. 

Keith Stock — Columbus, o., indef. 

Keith Players— Union Hill, N. J- 

Knickerbocker Players — Syracuse, N. Y.. In- 
def. 

Llscomb Players— Majestic, San Francisco, 
CaL. Indef. 

Liberty Players— Strand, San Diego, Cat, 
Indef. 

Liberty Players — Norumbega Park, Mass., 
Indef. 

Lyceum Theatre Stock — Duluth, Minn., in- 
def. 

Lyric Stock — Lincoln, Neb.. Indef. 

Lyric Theatre Players — Hamilton, Can. 

MacLean, Pauline, Stock — Caleron Park, N. 
Y. 

Majestic Theatre Stock — Los Angeles, CaL, 
Indef. 

Manhattan Players — Rochester, N. Y., Indef. 

Marshall Stock — Washington, D. C- indef. 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles. CaL, Indef. 

Mlnturn Stock — Milwaukee, Wis., Indef. 

Orpheum Players — Montreal, Can., Indef. 

Otis OUve Palyers — La Fayette, Ind., Indef. 

Permanent Players Orpheum, Moose Jaw. 
Sask.. Can . indef. 

Piney Theatre Stock Co. — Boise, Idaho, In- 
def. 

Park Theatre Stock— TJtlca, N. Y., indef. , 

Poll Players. Springfield. Mass.. Indef. 

Poll Players — Waterbury, Mass., indef. 

Poll Flayers — Wilkesbarre, Pa., Indef. 

Poll Players — Worcester, Mass., indef. 

Robins Players — Toronto, Can.. Indef. 

Royal Stock Co. — Vancouver. B. C, Indef. 

Shlpman Co., Bert, — Hot Springs, Ark., In- 
def. 

Savoy Players — Hamilton, Can., indef. 

Spooner, Cecil — Miner's Bronx, N. Y. City, 
indef. 

Stevenson Musical Stock— Hartford, Conn., 
indef. 

Taylor Musical Stock— Penaeook, N. H., In- 
def. 

CIRCUS 

EUngllng Bros, and B. & B.— Milwaukee, 
Wis.. 21; Rockford. 111.. 22; Madison, Wis., 
23; Minneapolis, Minn., 25; Mankato, 
Minn.. 26; Sioux Falls, S. D., 27. 




Peek-a-Boo — Gayety, St. Louis. Mo, 31-Sept, 

Roseland Girls — Star. Cleveland, 18-28: BID" 
plre, Toledo, Toledo, 25-30. 

Rose SydeU's London Belles — Gaiety, De- 
troit. 18-23 : Gayety, Toronto, Can., 26-80. 

8am Howe's Show — Casino, Philadelphia, 18- 
23 ; Miner's 140th Street, New York, 25-80. 

Sight Seers — Jacques, Waterbury. Conn. 18- 
28 : New York. 25-30. 

Social Maids— Gayety, Washington, 18-23; 
Gayety, Pittsburgh, 25-30. 

Sporting Widows— Miner*!. 149th Street. 
New York, 18-28; Casino, Brooklyn. 25-80. 

Star and Garter Shows— Star * Garter. Chi- 
cago, 18-28 ; open. 25-30. . 

Step Lively Girls — Qajety. Boston, 18-23; 
Columbia, New York, 25-30. 

Twentieth Century Maids — Columbia, Chi- 
cago, 17-28; Gayety, Detroit, 25-30. __ 

Victory Belles — Empire. Toledo.' 18-23; 
Lyric, Dayton, 26-30. .' 

AMERICAN WHEEL 

All Jan Review — Empire, Cleveland, 18-28; 

Cadillac. Detroit. 25-30. 
Aviator Girls— Gayety, Baltimore, 25-80. ■ 
Broadway Belles — Empire. Indianapolis, 17- 

28 : Gayety, Louisville, 25-80. „ • 

Beauty Revue— Bnglewood, Chicago, 17-28; 

Gayety, Milwaukee, 25-80. 
Blue Birds — Empire. Cleveland, 15-80. 
Cabaret Girls— Standard. St. Louis. 17-23; 

Terre Haute, Ind.. 24; Park. Indianapolis. 

25-30. 
Cracker Jacks — Star, Brooklyn, 10-28; Plasa, 

Springfield, Mass., 25-30. 
Dixon's Big Review — Gayety, Newark, 18-28: 

Wrlghtsown, N. J.. 25-30. 
Edmond Hayes Show — Newburg. N. Y., 21- 

23; Olympic, New York. 25-80. 
Follies of Pleasure — Majestic, Wllkes-Barre. 



Pa.. 18-23; Empire, Hoboken, 25-80. 
French Frolics — Gayety, L 
Lyceum, Columbus, 25-30. 



Sayety. Louisville. 17-23; 



MINSTRELS 

Gus Hill's— Batavia, N. Y.. 21; Rome. 22; 

Watertown, 23; Oneida, 25. 
Al G. Felds — Louisville, Ky.. Sept. 1-6. 

COLUMBIA WHEEL ' 

Al Beeves' Show — Gayety, Omaha, 18-23; 

Gayety, Kansas City, 25-30. 
Abe Reynolds' Revue — Gayety, Pittsburgh, 

18-23; Park. Youngstown, O., : 25-27; 

Grand, Akron, O., 28-30. 
Beat Show In Town — Lay off. 18-23 ; Empire, 

Albany, 25-30. 
Ben Welch's Show — Gayety, St. Louis, 18-28; 

Columbia, Chicago, 26-30. 
Befaman Show— Hur tig & Semen's. New 

York, 18-23; Orpheum. Peterson, 25-80. 
Beauty Trust — Lay off,. 18-23 ; Gayety, 

Omaha, 26-30. 
Bill Watson's Parisian Whirl — Gayety, Buf- 
falo, 18-23; Gayety, Rochester. 25-30. 
Bontons — Olympic. Cincinnati. 18-23: Star 

and Garter, Chicago, 25-30. 
Bowery, Burlesquers — Empire. Brooklyn, 18- 

28; People's, Philadelphia, 25-30.. 
Bostoman's— Oayety, Rochester. N. Y.. 18-23: 

Beatable, Syracuse) 25-27 ; Lumbers, Utica. . 

28-30. 
Burlesque Review — Casino, Brooklyn, 18-23 ; 

Empire, Newark. 26-80. 
Burlesque Wonder Show — People's. Phlladel- 
. phla. 18-23 ; Palace, Baltimore, 25-80. 
Dave Marlon Show — Stamford, Conn., 20 ; 

Park. Bridgeport, 21-28; Yorkvllle. New 

York. 25-30. 
Follies of the Day — Empire. Newark, N. J.. 

18-23; Casino. Philadelphia. 25-30. 
Girls A-La-Carte — Orpheum. Peterson. N. J-. 

18-28; Majestic, Jersey City. 25-30. 
Girls of the U. 8. A — Park. Youngstown. O., 

18-20: Grand Akron, O., 21-23; Star. 

Cleveland. 25-30. 
Golden Crooks— Gayety. Toronto. Out.. 18- 

2S; Gayety. Bucalo. 25-30. 
Harry Hastings' Show — Newburg. Pough- 

keepale, 18-28; Casino. Beston, 25-80. 
Hello, America ! — Gayety. St Louis, 24-80. 
Hip-Hip. Hooray — Beatable, Syracuse, 18-20; 

Lumbers, TJtlca, 21-23; Gayety, Montreal, 

Can.^ 25-30. ■ ' '■ 1, - 

Lew Kelly's Shaw — Columbia. New York, 

18-23: frmplre. Brooklyn, 29-30. 
Liberty Girls— Majestic, Jersey City. N. J., 
•-■'.. 18-28: Perth Amboy. N. J., 25; Plainfleld. 

•3»; Stamford, Conn.. 27; Park, Bridge- 
port. Conn, 28-80. . . ■ _ 
Maids of America — Grand, Hartford, Conn., 

18-28 : Jacques, -waterbury. Conn, 28-30. 
' Million Dollar Dolls— Lyric, Dayton, O. , 18- 



Glrls from the Follies— Penn Circuit, 18-23; 

Majestic- Scranton, 25-30. 
Girls from Joyland — Majestic, -Scranton, 18- 

23; Star. Brooklyn, 25-30. 
Girls, Girls, Girls — Gayety. Newark, 25-80. 
Grown Up Babies — Gayety, Sioux City, la, 

■17-23; Century, Kansas City 25-30. 
Jasx Babies — Olympic. New York, 16-28; 

Trocadero. Philadelphia, 25-80. 
Kewple Dolls — Oayety, Baltimore, 10-28; 

Lyceum, Washington, 25-80. 
Lid Lifters — Cadillac, Detroit. Mich., 18-23: 

Englewood. Chicago, 25-30. 
Midnight Maids — Armory, Blnghamton, N. 

Y., 18-20; International, Niagara Falls. 

N. Y. ; Star. Toronto, Can.. 25-30. 
Mischief Makers — One-nlghters Into ' St. 

Louis, 18-23 : Standard. St. Louis, 25-80. 
Monte Carlo Girls — Englewood. Chicago, 18- 

23; one-nlghters Into St. Louis. 2540. 
"Ob, Frenchy !" — Gayety. Milwaukee, 17-23 ; 

Gayety, . Minneapolis, 25-30. 
Pacemakers — Penn Circuit, 25-30. 
Parisian Flirts — Grand, Worcester, Mass.. 

2540. 
Pat White Show — Gayety, Minneapolis, 18- 

23.: O-iyetv, Sioux City. la.. 25-30. 
Rsszle Dazzle Girls — Bijou. Philadelphia, 18- 

23; Broadway. Camden. N. J, 25-30. 
Record-Breakers — Victoria, Pittsburgh, 2540. 
Bound the Town — Gayety, Brooklyn, 18-23 ; 

Majestic. Wllkes-Barre. 26-30. 
Sliding Billy Watson-^Star. Toronto, Ont, 

16-23 : New Academy, Buffalo. 25-80. 
Social Follies — - Howard, Boston, 18-23 ; Gay- 
ety, Brooklyn, 25-80... 
Some Show — Armory. Blnghamton. N. Y., 

25-27: International. Niagara Falls, 2840. 
Sport Girls — Howard. Boston, 2540. • 
Stone & PlUard's — Gayety, St, Paul. Minn., 

2540. 
Sweet Sweetie Girls— Bijou, Philadelphia, 25- 
SO. 
Tempters — Haymarket, Chicago, 17-23; Gay 
— iraukee. 



ety, Milwauk 



2540. 




NO make-Tip p oi soning! Pure, grati- 
fying, safe, ALBOLENE fa what 
you should use always to- remove 
make-up, because it keeps the skin in 
good condition. 

It has been Irmous for Years as the 
foremost product of its kind. 
For the make-up box 1 and 2 ounce 
tubes. -Also in *- and 1 lb. cans. 

ALBOLENE it told by druagut* 

and dealers in make-up. Writ* 

for free sample. 



McKESSON & ROBBINS 



PENN C 1RCUIT 

Wheeling. W. Va. — Monday. : -". £ ' ■ 
TJniontown, Pa. — Tuesday. , 

Johnstown. Pa. — Wednesday. . --• . -. 
Altoona, Pa. — Thursday. 

WiUlamsport JCb. — Friday. 

York, Pa.— Saturday. ."i • - 

HOTEL NOW PICTURE THEATRE 

! Belfast, Ireland, Aug. 14. — The Grand 
Central Hotel, this city, has been acquired 

by the Provincial Cinematograph, Ltd., 
which will convert it into a picture palace. 



Manufacturing Chemists 

Eat. USS 

91 Fulton Street • New York 



MUSICAL DIRECTOR AT LIBERTY 

Addrees R. S. SMITH. IS W. list St, New 
York CKy. 

JAMES MADISON'S ADDRESS 

from June 20 to Acs. 28 will ba Flatiron BoHmag. 
■44 Market St.. San Francisco. Address him there 
for sets to be written during the Bummer. 

My N. Y. Office open as usual 
WANTED— Lady Trick Cyclist 

First class, with own -wheel, ton in partner- 
»hi P with comedian. "X. Y. Z," care Clipper, 
New York. 

AT LIBERTY 

For stock cofifawDt, western states pre- 
ferred, Al character woman, age 35, ability, 
warstoba. •sperisne*. Spending summer on 
ranch. Write to MarbeH, Goto. Ticket bom 
Denver. Colo. MARY AVER DUFKEE. 



MAIL PIANIST. Address J. J. BOWMAN, 
•3 Gacdac St, PmicUcaansle, New York. 



KOBURN EMPIRE ROBBED 

London, Eng., Aug. 14. — The Kilhnrn 
Empire was entered last Sunday and ? 1,000 
in j cash abstracted from the safe, which 
bad been torn from the wall where It was 
imbedded. The thieves entered either by 
way of the lavatory' or the property door, 
through which some scenery was being car- 
ried in. ■ They made their escape from the 
stage door f/ which was locked on Satur- 
day night, but was found open on Monday 
morning, when the robbery was discovered. 



Catering to the T Profession 

FERDINAND 
BLOCK 

Attorney at Law 

1112-14 dwstwat Stras* 

Philadelphia 



Extracts of tk 

of Paaosyhraaia seat 



<TJkit it no* a Paef-Pawitr) 



23; Olympic, Cincinnati. 23-30. 
Mol lie Williams' Co. — Casino. -Boston, 18-28 ; 

Grand, Hartford, Conn.. 2iH0._--- '•- ■-::•• 
Ohl Girl— Empire. Albany, N. Y-. 18-28; 

Boston, 25-30. 



"HOME A BEAUTY" OPENS AUG. 30 

London, Aug. 16. — "Home and Beauty" 
will' open at the Playhouse on Saturday, 
August 30. The piece is presented by 

Gladys Cooper and Frank' Corson. The 
former will also appear in the cast. Others 

in the cast are: Malcom Cherry, Hubert 
Hsrben, Lyston Lyle, Jean CadeJl and 

Lottie "Venne. . ' -; ^ ..-.-..'-.■..'; ' '•' 1 



BASE BALL 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

POLO GROUNDS 



Aug. 20-22 with St. 

Aug-. 23-26 with PiHsborg 



32 



THE NEW YORK CUPPER 



August 20*; 1919 



J. C. TOOT & PAL 

Original Comeda- Novelty with Soma Dancing Dog 
Toon and Pal fat Ou Direction — JAS. PURSELL 



WILLIAM CONWAY 



THE IRISH PIANIST— IN VAUDEVILLE 



The LittW Magnet in Vaudeville 



LUCY MONROE & CO. 

In "CRANBERRIES" 

DIRECTION— GLADYS F. BROWN, Palaea Theatre BIdg., Now York 



GEORGE 



BOOKED SOLID— LOEWS CIRCUIT 



ISABE1X 



DDL, TOM JONES 



STAGE HANDS STRIKE MAY BE NATIONAL 



D IN A 

DIRECTION— LEW LESLIE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



DAN MICHAELS 

NEW YORK FOLLIES 

la an all star east Musical Comedy EntitW "A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING." 
Two Acta and Twelve Sei 



AL 



MYRTLE 



MARDO & LORENZ 



The Wop and The Girl 



In Vaudeville 



MARION and BILLY 

VAUDEVILLE'S YOUNGEST TEAM 
Singing, Dancing and Talking — In Vaudeville 



EDDIE 



ETHEL 



STAFFORD & WATTS 



THAT CLEVER PAIR 



DDL— MEYER B. NORTH 



JAMES 



CLARENCE 



JOHNSON and PARSON 

"Jazz That's Jazz" 

DIRECTION— PHIL BUSH 



HARRY OAKS & CO. 

In the Comedy Clastic, "Behind the Future" 
BOOKED SOUP KEITH TIME DIRECTION-JACK LEWIS 

ED and EDNA FANTON 

In a dainty aerial oddity. Dir. Sam Baerwiti 



(.Continued 
amount. The show will probably ran all. 
week; Monday night it played to 'abso- 
lute capacity, crowds being turned " away 
from the box-office when no further stand- 
ing room was to be bad. 

A letter from David Horsley, the mov- 
ing picture producer, was received at 
Equity headquarters on Monday, in which 
be lamented George M. Cohan's actions, 
and declared that his sympathy was all 
with the actors. He enclosed an original 
poem, the tenor of which was a reminder 
to Cohan that bis place should be, in. 
Horsley's opinion, with the actors in the 
fight, attention' being called to the. strug- 
gles be bad to win his way against mana- 
gerial opposition. One of the stanzas 
reads : 

Horsley's Poem 

He wrote a song that did a lot to make 
the whole world free. 

We did our share and went abroad across 
the angry sea.' • . 

The flag he loves and waves so much be- 
longs to you and me. 

We spread the freedom that we prize, hu- 
manity to. save. 

And that now we are back again, we ask 
but what we gave. . 

We sure decline to come back home and 
be a showman's slave. 

A letter received Monday from the United 
Board of Business Agents of the Building- 
Trades heartily endorses the stand taken 
by the Equity and tenders moral support. 

Two Federal mediators — Benjamin 
Squires and Rowland D. Mahany came to 
New York from Washington at the incep- 
tion of the strike to investigate the fracas. 
Just what their' Investigations proved, no 
one seems to know. They departed as 
suddenly as they came and. while here, ap- 
parently did nothing. . 

Early this week Sam Harris was consult- 
ing with his attorneys, O'Brien, Malovlnsky 
and Driscoll, about getting a warrant for 
Harry Lambert, for "intrusion on real 
estate." Lambert had previously charged 
Harris with assault. 

It was announced on Monday at Chorus 
headquarters that the .following would be 
demanded In the Chorus Equity contracts: 
Eight performances to constitute a week 
with a minimum salary of thirty-five dol- 
lars while on the road and thirty dollars 
In New York. The managers would be 
obliged to furnish all articles of costume. 
Four weeks of rehearsal would be given 
gratis; the next two weeks would demand 
half salary: and all weeks after six would 
receive full salary. After four weeks of 
rehearsals,, the chorus must receive, under 
this contract, at least two weeks full, sal- 
ary. On night Jumps, the managers must 
furnish sleepers, with only one person in 
berth. This ultimatum, as far as it can 
be ascertained, is Miss Dressler's own idea 
and has not been- voted upon at a chorus 
meeting. 

Speculation Over Crisis 

Much speculation was abroad early this 
week as to when the crucial point In the 
trouble will be reached, managers and ac- 
tors alike Inquiring of all their friends as 
to which side they think will "break" first. 
And there were not a few who were of the 
opinion that it is here at the present time 
and that the Managers' Association will 
be the first to recede from Its position. 

In this regard, a bet was made on Broad- 
way last Monday that A. H. Woods would 
get out within a week. There have been 
many Instances brought to light to show 
that Woods Is anything but antagonistic 
toward the actor, not displaying the hostile 
attitude that is so apparent with some of 
his fellow-managers. 

Woods Buys Picket* Umbrella. 

When the pickets, last week, were busy 
in front of one of his attractions. Woods 
took pity on some of the girls who were 
walking* in the rain and told them to go to 
a nearby umbrella store, equip themselves 
for the storm and charge the bill to him. 

"I don't want you to get pneumonia," he . 
said. "The strike will soon be over and I'll 
need many of you to work for me again." 

His brother, Martin Herman, also shares 
Woods' good nature and has been loaning 
money right and left to striking actors who, 
he says, can pay him back when there Is a 
resumption of the better days. 

"I feel sorry for a lot of these actors," he 
confided, "and I'd feel guilty If I didn't help 
out those of them who are my old friends. 
When it's all over, Al and 1 don't want any 
hard feelings to exist." - - 



frompoge'Sy 'V 4?~ T^ ";:'\V 

* ."', Another, point of a Ign in cance, ■ so far '.as 
-Woods Is concerned, lies In the fact that he, 
seems disinclined to resort to retaliation. 
He has made a number of promises to re- 
open "A Voice in the Dark," but it seems 
no nearer to reopening now with a new cast 
than on the evening. that the strike was first 
called. 

When it comes to actually. balking, how- 
ever, such action would present a ticklish 
- situation, and it is probably easier for the 
members to remain passive and "saw wood" 
than to. butt their heads against a atone 
wall. The situation is practically in the 
hands of the two large booking offices:' the 
Shuberts, and Klaw and Erlanger. If any 
of the. smaller producers balk, they would 
probably find it well nigh Impossible to se- 
cure bookings for their shows in the future; 
and, having no theatres of their own, might 
find themselves In no position to do busi- 
ness. . In any event, the choice routes would 
unquestionably be given to the managers 
who had remained loyal to the managerial 
association. 

George M. Cohan and the Shuberts seem 
to be the chief interests that are keeping 
the association together. The Shuberts have, 
about forty producers dependent upon them 
for the booking of attractions. 

In" both Equity and managerial circles, 
there are many who lay the blame for the 
present situation at the door of the Shu- 
berts. It is pointed out that they have had 
considerable litigation relative to the break - 
. Insr of .contracts and have been extremely 
arbitrary at times In dealing with the ac- 
tor. 

Cohan Forced Situation 

To George M. Cohan belongs the credit 
of making the Managers' Association more 
completely representative now than at the 
time of Its organization, for, at that tune, 
Klaw and Erlanger, Flo Ziegfeld and 
Charles Dillingham were not members. It 
Is said that Cohan went to Erlanger and. 
gave him his choice between Joining his as- 
sociation or losing the booking of the Cohan 
and Harris attractions. 

Erlanger, It is said, -asked Cohan to come 
over and Bee him, but Cohan replied that 
Erlanger knew, where his office was and 
that If he wanted to see him. he could come 
over there. Erlanger, it is reported, then 
went to the Cohan and Harris Theatre, and 
told Cohan that "there must be some mis- 
take about any report that he didn't want 
to Join the association" whereupon Cohan 
Is said to have replied: "That If there was 
a mistake, no harm had been done and. If 
there wasn't for him (Erlanger) to remem- 
ber what he had ' told him." 

Various managers came In for raklnga 
over the coals at the meetings of the Equity 
during the past week. The name of the 
Shuberts has almost invariably brought 
hisses and groans from the strikers. Most 
of the fire, however, was directed toward 
Cohan, and, although nothing could evidently . 
be found to say against him directly, fun 
was poked at his "Over There" song, flip- 
pant remarks, were made upon his threat 
to run an elevator and .oratorical indict- 
ments were made against the man who had 
always been known as the actor's friend 
until his recent stand/ 

However, the flames of the striking ora- 
tors have died down considerably and the 
last few days have "been marked by -more 
allusions to principles and fewer to Indi- 
vidual managers and personalities. Per- 
sonal vilifications are not being encouraged, 
the actors being constantly reminded by ' 
their leaders that they are "ladles and 
gentlemen." •■ 

Throughout the week, there were con- 
stant rumors of overtures of peace from ■ 
both sides of the struggle, but whenever 
they appeared they were Instantly denied. 

A statement from the offices of Comstock 
& Gest was to the effect tbat Paul R. Tur- 
ner, Equity attorney, had approached Mor- 
ris Geat and said both sides were losing a 
great deal of money and there should be 
some basis on which', they could get to- 
gether. The managers regarded this as 
showing that the actors were willing to 
grant concessions,' it was said. 

Turner Explains 

Mr. Turner explained .his action in this 
statement to tbe press: . -• 

"I met Mr. Gest in front of the Police 
Court, where he said he was answering a 
summons, and in the course of the conver- 
sation the strike was referred to. I did 
say to Mr. Gest that I felt- that the present 
situation was in all respects regrettable; 
that although I had made Inquiries of many 




(Thit is not a Face Pou-der) 



Haunting, Dreamy. Sensational tff' 



'!' Waltz Song Success 



HAWAIIAN /nOOtN LIGHT 



Chicago 



McKlNLEY MUSIC- COMPANY 



New York 



August 20, 1919 



THlv NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



■ - r,\y| .-•>,-•*•-,•-,..',> .-—9 

managers and many people connected with ■ 
their offices I was unable' to find the point 
of difference or learn from any Individual 
manager that he felt that the requests of 
the Actors' Equity Association were not 
just ones. .-.■•-■ „..'■■.-• 

"Therefore that I . could not understand 
why a conference could not be had which 
would lead to a settlement. 1 also told Mr. 
Gest that the position the managers were 
taking was robbing them of the respect of. 
organized labor and all , who were In sym- 
pathy with It and that their continued re- 
fusal to arbitrate could only eventually lead 
to a massing against them of all classes of 
people who labor In the amusement world." 

A peace committee from E. H. Sothern's 
society also attempted to bring about peace, 
but, on calling on the managers, they were 
advised that the managers would brook no 
outside interference. 

Frank GUlmore, Equity Secretary of the 
Actors' Equity Association, told reporters 
Dr. Frank Crane had asked him to desig- 
nate an. actor to meet the managers, with 
the Idea of talking over their differences. 

John Draw Selected 

"I designated Mr. Drew," said Mr. Gill- 
more, "because Mr. Drew is not a member 
of the Executive Committee. I have not 
heard from Mr. Drew and don't know 
whether he would accept such a mission." 

The managers, when asked If. they had 
heard from John Drew, said they would be 
pleased to talk to Mr, Drew on any subject 
except the Actors' Equity Association. 
. A group of playwrights, headed by 
George V. Hobart. Guy Bolton, P. C. Wode- 
house, Irvln Cobb, Rot Cooper Megrue. 
George Ade and Harry B. Smith offered 
t'-i'ir services to both the actors and the 
managers In an effort to effect a settle- 
ment. 

Both of these offers were accepted by 
the actors, but the managers, through Ar- 
thur Hopkins, said they would never again 
deal with the Actors' Equity Association. 

A hint of the terms on which the man- 
agers are willing to aid In ending the strike 
was contained In a statement given out 
by Arthur Hopkins on behalf of the Man- 
agers' Association. The managers. Mr. 
Hopkins said, will "submit matters of con- 
tract fulfillment to a Joint board of' actors 
and. managers, with an outside umpire." 

Mr. Hopkins's statement was as follows: 

The Producing Managers' Association 
cannot deal with or recognize the ■ Actors' 
Equity Association, for the reason that It 
has ceased to be the representative of the 
actor and has become his dictator. 

A member of the Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion can no longer ' freely enter Into any 
contract with a manager which he Is cer- 
tain o/ fulfilling. His first obligation Is to 
the Actors' Equity Association. He signs 
an oath and gives a bond that at all times 
he will abide by the dictates of the asso- 
ciation. 

If he Is ordered to break a contract he 
will break It or be expelled from the as- 
■oclntlon and called a "scab." • 

The contract between actor and manager 
ceases to be a contract between two par- 
ties. The Actors' Equity Association Is 
the third party -and the predominant one. 
No matter how profitable and pleasant the 
relations between the Individual actor and 
manager may be. these relations were at all 
times exposed to immediate destruction bv 
a third party. The Actors' Equity Asso- 
ciation has demonstrated that It will not 
hesitate to destroy these relations. The 
present strike Is a complete demonstration 
of that fact. The hundreds of actors work- 
ing peacefully under the Actors' Equity 
were ordered out at an hour's notice. Great 
havoc and great suffering were wrought at 
the Equity Association's nod. 

The theatrical business "Is unlike most 
others. It Is built on special, unique, and 
Individual service. The peaceful continua- 
tion of this service must be removed from 
any danger of Interference or there can 
he no theatre. The Producing Managers' 
Association wants to deal with the actors 
collectively as to the form of contract. It 
welcomes any organization of actors whose 
fundamental principle shall be the fulfill- 
ment under all conditions of the Individual 
contract. 

Wants Dependable Association 

The Producing Managers' Association 
again offers with any dependable actors' 
organization to submit matters of contract 
fulfillment to a joint board of actors and 
managers, with an outside umpire. The 
Producing Managers' Association will bind 
Itself to stand always on the one great 
fundamental that the theatre can only live 
when contracts between Individuals are 
supported In their enforcement by every 
agency of the theatre. 

Bring us an actors' association that Is 
founded on the same principle. We will 
offer It a form of contract that Is better 
than the former Actors' Equity Association 
contract. , 

But it must be an organization In which 
the managers have faith. 

The managers also reported the breaking 
up of a growbn secret service atrlliuted to 
the striking sctors. From the managers' 
offices It was announced that Inn Claire's 
brother, Alan Fnpnn. who has a Job In the 
office of Chamberlain Brown, had been ap- 
proached . .on the matter .of sedition. An 
English actor. -according to the reports, had 
come to Paean and sulci that if he would 
supply the Equity with the names of play- 
ers placed In jobs made vacant by the strike, 
he would be "handsomely: naid." 

"How much, handsomely paid?"- Mr. "Fa- ' 
pan Is reported, as asking. ■ ■ • -, 



■A "Twenty-five dollars a week," was the re- 
ply. " -nd naturally." the bulletin concludes, 
.""Mr, Pagan refused." 

Going into Glob* 

Announcements of - a magician's show go- 
ing Into the . Globe Theatre next week, 
aroused a lot of comment . on Broadway to 
the effect that such things could only bap- 

Sen while a strike was on. Thurston, the 
[ugtclan, with a. company of twenty-six per- 
sons, starts' an engagement there on Mon- 
day, August 25. 

Arrests for picketing were less frequent 
than in the first week of the strike, due, no 
doubt, to the tactful way In which picketing 
Is now being done, the pickets addressing 
their conversations -to each other in' loud 
tones rather than to passersby. - 

Summons and arrest cases which .had to 
do with the strike of the actors when called 
last week In the West Side Court, were put 
over a week. Among the charges reviewed 
are : 

Sidney Davis' arrested on a charge of 
disorderly conduct by Sergeant Eugene 
Barry, and Richard Gordon, an actor, 
charged with disorderly conduct bv Stanley 
Shorn, a theatrical manager of West 54tn 
street: Morris Gest, a theatrical manager, 
charged by Alexander Frank, an actor of 
West 84th street, with assault. The alleged 
assault happened last Saturday, and Frank 
obr-.lned a summons for Gest. 

S m Harris, of Cohan & Harris, wag also 
In the West Side Court on a summons ob- 
tained from Magistrate Frothlrignnm by 
Harry Lambert, an actor, who charges that 
Harris struck him in the fact. 

Flo Ziegfeld, It was learned, has taken 
some of tbe girls who remained with him 
when the "Follies" was forced to close, and 
placed them In bis "Frolic" shows atop the 
Xew Amsterdam, which Is still running, and 
is paying them double salary for the work 
they are doing. 
' This means that the girls are being paid 
their regular salary, although they are not 
working nt present In the show downstairs, 
find. In -ndditlon, ore receiving an additional 
amount for working In the shows upstairs. 
Incidentally, Ziegfeld announced last week 
that he Intends to pay the entire "Follies" 
cost full salaries for tbe entire period that 
the New Amsterdam Is forced to remain dark 
by reason of tbe actors' strike. ' This will 
cost Ziegfeld close to S15,000 for every week 
that the "Follies" falls to play. 

Cohan Won't Rejoin Friara 

One of the most interesting Incidents of 
the week concerned a visit by 300 Frlnrs 
to George M. Cohan, tbelr purpose being to 
ask him to reconsider the resignation which 
he banded In to their club with such a dis- 
play of verbal Arc-works. The Friars marched 
from tbelr club house, to the Cohan and 
Harris Theatre. Into the theatre filed the 
Frlnrs, where they formed a minstrel semi- 
circle on the stage. Then a messenger was 
sent for Cohan, who presently appeared, 
wrapped In a brown overcoat and wearing a 
Scotch tweed cap pulled far over his eyes. 
He puffed nervously on a cigarette.' 

"George." said John J. Gleason of the 
I' rlars, "George, you have resigned from tbe 
Friars. We don't want you to leave us. 
We don't wont to lose oor best friend, our 
beloved Abbot. We want" 

At that point Cohan raised his hand, threw 
his cigarette to the floor, stamped on It, and 
said ; 

"I don't want to interrupt you. I know 
whot you are going to say. This Is a won- 
derful compliment you ore paying me. But 
I want you to understand this: 1 am light- 
ing with my friends, with the men who hove 
f-elped me to attain what little success I 
nave in the theatrical game. I tell you I 
am In a fight — a very bitter light — and I 
am going to fight everybody who Is fighting 
me. 

Cohan hod said several days ago he bad 
quit the Friars because they had given him 
"the raspberry." Evidently he felt the be- 
stowal of "the raspberry" very keenly, for 
when he spoke to the Friars last evening he 
made no attempt to conceal his bitterness. 

Out In tbe orchestra tbe musicians were 
tuning up for tbe evening performance. The 
irowd was filing in Ao witness a perform- 
ance of "Tbe Royal Vagabond." There was 
a profound silence as Cohan continued : 

"I am not going to mix with those who 
are fighting the men that I am fighting with: 
I am part of an organization that Is fight- 
ing your, organization." 

"George. George," pleaded several voices In 
unison, "George, we are not fighting you." 

"You're fighting us, and I have been 
dragged In," said Cohan. "No matter how 
you express yourself, there's nothing In this 
world that will ever bring me into tbe 
Friars or the Lambs Club • again. .Not as 
long as I live. That's the way it stands. 
I may have broken my word with others, 
but I have never broken It to myself." 

Then William A. Brady, who had marched 
with the Friars all the way from the Monas- 
tery, pushed through the press at the end 
of the semicircle, right stage, and rushing 
over to Mr. Cohan, grasped his hand. 

"I know. Bill," said Cohan, sadly, "but 
there's not a chance In the world." 

"I'm not going to argue." he shouted. 

stepping forward and shaking his fist. "If 

it comes to an argument, you'll find I can 

.shout- as loud as -sny one. You sav tbe 

Frlara are back of me. Nobody's back "of me 

, but myself. I fought my own battle and 

forged to the front by my own exertions. 

. I. happened to be Abbot of the Friars. 

I was only a figurehead there, and I knew 

■jfc „rou'H probably go ont now and say. 

Jfey-, let's leave that jonnf bam alone/ 

-Tou'll-say rm- yellow;'' T'-ooVt- care- what 

yon say.- I I hank you for -this wonderful 



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IN VAUDEVILLE 



34 



THE NEW YOR K CI |?0R 



August 20, 1919 






- STAGE HANDS STRIKE MAY BECOME NATIONAL TO AID ACTORS 

^ '. --^- ';. - .'■•- ;j /\ f i^ontiwied from page 3A.) 



demonstration, bat I cannot change my mind. 
I can oarer walk back into the Umbi 
Club or into tbe Friars CIn!> and keep 'my. 
self-respect. If I find I've made a mistake 
I am lost a bis enough kid to rectify lb." 

v - . . . THURSDAY 

At a mats meeting of the Equity called to 
order at .three o'clock Thursday afternoon In 
the ballroom of the Hotel Astor, instructions 
in war tacttcs by actors who had seen serr- 
lee as - offlcera overseas seemed to be Tery 
much the order of the day. Among the lm- 

Krtant speakers in this connection were 
eutenant-Colonel Earle Booth, Captain Wil- 
liam Harrington, son of the famous Ned, 
and Captain Everrett Bntterfleld,. who all 
alluded to their experiences abroad, declaring 
that the lessons they learned "over there 
could be applied, with effect, to the actor- 
manager war that is now being waged. 

Otherwise the speeches were, for the most 
part, of the aame order as have been heard 
day after day at the Equity meetings on 
West Forty-flfth street 

Perhaps the most finished apeaker of the 
afternoon was De Wolf Hopper, who was Tery 
candid in admitting that some of the man- 
agers were personally good friends of his 
and "capital fellows" but that, as a group, 
they belonged to the class of arch-villains. 
In answering the managers' claim that the 
actor, by organisation, loses his Individuality, 
Hopper asked: 

"And how about the Managers' Protective 
Association? Hasn't every manager who Is 
a member of that association lost bis Indi- 
viduality T Why, If he blows his nose at an 
member he la liable to forfeit 110,- 



Equlty- contracts.' 

ked np 



The audience cheered blm to the echo when 
he hinted, "I'm not so sure but that Uncle 
■8am might not step in, if these managers 
don't soon come to terms and ask some of 
them if they have not violated the Sherman 
anti-trust laws." .. ; 

Robin proved to be more conscientious 
than the average attorney when he vowed: 
"Why, I'd rather die than lose this fight." 

Ethel Barry mo re, with, the voice of "Oar 
Mrs. McChesneyv" mad the shortest speech of 
the day but, by .no means, received the least 
?£?%£ W t *£3UfiE& ** *"* **** •* It^Kred™ stog^ bouto at Madlaon Square 

...ii 00 ™,?^* 7 • dr *!5!i. v . Garden for the strikers' ben - 

"All my family is .with yon heart and 
soul," she said. "Everyone knows what the 



In some quarters, this Is 
looked upon aa a .break In the managerial 
lineup. But Hast is not a member of the 
Producing Managers' Association. However, 
be Is allied with the Shuherts and la to pro- 
duce a number of pieces In conjunction with 
them. ■ ■' i^- - ,.. ; ; 

Boxers Offer to Help 

The American Boxers' Loyalty League of- 
fered their aid to the actors, It was an- 
nounced, through its secretary, Harry Neary, 
It offered to stage bouts at Mai" 
Garden for the strikers' benefit 



But 



whether It mattered or not, each 



-seemed reluctant to give np the honors she 
claimed, and the matter still hangs fire. 

Millie Freeman stated at a meeting that, 
being a striker, she objects to being billed on 
the program of "Those who Walk In Dark. 

' MM" . ■ '. ...-.V 



Equity 

oSor 



Says Sh abort Is Worried 



He also gave an interesting side-light on 
Lee Shubert. 

"An author whose name I shan't mention 
here, bat who Is privileged to be in the 
councils of the managers, told Riley Hatch 
and Jim Corbett how the managers feci," he 
want on. "Ha told them that they're on 
tenter hooks. Lee Shubert keeps walking up 
and down his office on red hot irons ana 
keeps telling the others : "We must do some- 
thing. I'm told by my backers to go ahead 
and forfeit my $10,000 and open np my ihe- 
atree." ' 

This statement by Hopper 'stopped the 
show" and it was almost a minute before he 
could go on with his speech because of the 
din. 

Marie Dressier who spoke early in the day 
so that she could get away to attend a meet- 
ing of the striking chorus girls and boys that 
was being held at the Amsterdam Opera 
House, made a typical Dressier barrangue 
and gained a big laugh with her allusion to 
the managers, their homes, their theatres, 
their autoa and their wiv es s a." 

"I have been fighting for the chorus," she 
concluded, "and I'm going to keep on fighting 
for them. In the past, I have made money 
for every manager I worked for and now 
they have got to come to me when they want 
a ehorua." 

Dudley Field Malone, a lawyer member of 
the Lambs Club, who has been speaking con- 
siderably concerning the dignity of the actor 
with reference to his new trades-unionlstle 
relation, declared "the moat dignified thing 
the actor ever did was to strike." 

The legal angle was covered in the address 
of W. B. Ruble, an attorney, who declared 
that "the managers spent $50,000 to quote 
excerpts from decisions that hate been dead 
since 1914." 



FM. 




(This it mot a Focm Powdtr) 



outcome Is going to be, because we're right." 

William Farnum raised a laugh when he 
cried out In stentorian tones: "I am the 
world's champion fisherman and I am with 
yon now book, line and sinker." 

Frank Bacon was. not on the stage with 
the rest of the speakers bat was called from 
the audience to apeak. He walked down the 
aisle to the speaker's platform while the 
ballroom rang with cheers. He was very 
willing, be declared, to stake all he had on 
the actor's aide of the strike, for bis wife 
has not forgotten how to cook on a one- 
burner eoal-oll stove. 

"I'm liable to be sent down the river for 
saying this," he said, "but, if I am, bacon 
will bring a higher price than ever before I" 

"The manager are betting ninety-five per 
cent on a color that I don't believe exists in 
the actor," were the words of Charles Shea, 
President of the International Stage Hands 
union. 

He then related how his anion had helped 
the strikers in the Danbary hatters' fight and 
promised: . 

■ "What we did for them we would surely 
do for you, and if each man of ours gave 
$20 to your cause, as we did In their fight, 
it would give yon $600,000." 

The announcement that the Lexington 
Avenue Opera House had been engaged by 
the Equity for a period beginning August 
18th and closing in December was enthusi- 
astically received at the Astor meeting. This 
followed the signing of a contract with 
George D. Qrundy, manager of the Opera 
House. It was announced that an all star 
bill, changing weekly, would be presented 
ther e by Equity members at popular prices — 
two. dollars and down — and great stress was 
laid upon the fact that no tickets for the 
performances coald be purchased from specu- 
lators. , 

Wynn Collect, $3,400 

Late on the program came EM Wynn. who 
asked for contributions for the initial ex- 
pense of the Lexington Opera House show. 
Three thousand four hundred dollars wss col- 
lecter. Later In the evening Wynn was seen 
on Broadway carrying the "treasure" to the 
bank, and no leas than 400 actors, passers-by 
and yeggs, were following on his heels. 

Other speakers were Thomas Oamble, Vice- 
Prealdent of the American Federation of 
Musicians; Hugh Frayne, Lionel Barry more, 
Max Barondaa, President of the '■ Hebrew 
Union of Actors Local No. 1, and Frank Oil- 
more. 

The evening meeting at strike headquarters 
on Forty-fifth street was crowded and the 
strikers still seemed to have considerable en- 
thusiasm left over from the Aator affair, for 
the speakers were applauded warmly, al- 
though nothing new was said. 

The Equity made public a letter from B. 
Iden Payne, the stage manager, which reads 
as follows: "In my function as stage di- 
rector, the strike does not effect me directly 
at the present time. But I should like to 
state, emphatically, that were I acting, I 
would take my stand with the actors and 
would not take any engagement as an actor 
without' Joining the A. B. A." ' 

An important announcement came from 
the Equity to the effect that Walter Hast, 
the producer, waa willing to grant only 



Among those who offered their services to 
the actors In this connection were the follow- 
ing: Champion Mike O'Dowd middle-weight; 
Champion Benny Leonard, lightweight; 
Champion Johnny Kiluane, featherweight; 
Champion Jack Brltton, welterweight; Cham- 
pion Pete Herman, bantamweight ; Joe Lynch, 
who defeated Jimmy Wilde, English cham- 

Slon; Joe Leonard, of New Tork; Willie 
ackson, of New York ; Lew Tendler. of 
Philadelphia: Ralph Brady, of Syracuse: 
Frankle Britt, of Boston ; Johnny Hurray, of 
New York: Charley Welnert, of Newark; 
Battling Levlnaky, of Philadelphia, and 
others. 

James J. Corbett and Joe Humphries will 
be referee and ring announcer respectively 
when the affair comes off. 

"Those Who Walk In Darkness" walked 
into the spotlight Thursday night at the 
Forty-Eighth Street Theatre and had a good 
house despite the number of pickets outside. 
L. J. O'Connor, whose name was on the pro- 
gram, did not appear. 

FRIDAY 

It was announced at Equity headquarters 
on Friday that Samuel Untermyer, the noted 
attorney, had offered hia . services without 
compensation to such strikers .as had been 
sued by the managers. He gave bis reason 
for doing so that "a victory of the managers 
would mark a long step backward in the 
Struggle of organized labor." The cheering 
over this announcement made West Forty 
fifth street resemble an election night when 
the popular candidate has been put over. 

The action of Untermyer la even more sig- 
nificant because of his financial interest In a 
number- of big theatres. In his letter to the 
Equity he disclosed that Interest when he 
wrote:- 

"I personally own and represent a half in- 
terest In the Shubert and Booth Theatre 



the 
De- 



properties and one-third interest 
Forty-fourth Street Theatre propel 
spite tbat I feel that the actors are right. 
In another portion of hia letter he said : 
"I regard "the principles Involved as of the 
highest public Importance and am willing to 
deal with the caso only in the light of pub- 
lic service. There is an element of the 
Eotesque In the character and extent of the 
Igatlon with which the courts have been 
suddenly flooded for the apparent purpose of 
intimidating the members of the Actors* 
Equity Association from asserting their 
rights." 

Untermyer characterised the managers as 
being 'twenty-five years behind the times." 

Usual Mas. Meeting 

The usual mass meetings were held at the 
Forty-fifth street headquarters and the fol- 
lowing were among the speakers: Dudley 
Field Malone, Frank Bacon, Frank Qlllmore, 
Hugh Frayne, Jefferson De Angeles, Lieut. 
Col Earle Booth, Ed Wynn and major Regi- 
nald Barlow. 

The meeting of the chorus girls and boys 
was made Interesting by Ethel Bailor, of the 
"Follies." and Fay Tunis, ..of. a ''Lonely 
Romeo," each asserting that she had been 
elected vice-president of the -chorus branch 
of the Equity. Miaa Tunis stated: 

"It really doesn't matter one way or the 
other. Miss Hallor and I are both fighting 
in the - 



In the first eight days of the strike, the 
Actors' Equity Association claims that their 
membership roster shows an increase of 2,400 
actors and actresses, "exclusive of choris- 
ters." But a list of the new members was 
refused the Clipper on the grounds that it 
would be Impossible to compile it for the 
press at the present time. When it was 
suggested that the stubs in the treasurer's 
receipt book would be a means of checking 
the accuracy of the statement as to the 
number of new members, the suggestion was 
turned down. 

Among the "telegrams of loyalty" received 
Friday, were messages from Charles Bonn 
Kennedy, author of "The Servant in the 
House": Edith Wynne Mathls (Mis. Ken- 
nedy), James O'Neill and Leo Dltrichstein. 

It wss stated that the "Oh My Dear" eom- 

Iiany, in Boston, is one hundred per cent 
oval to the Equity and that the Chicago 
situation remained unchanged and- that no 
farther action by the Equity waa being con- 
templated there. 

Three Jewish theatres. It waa announced, 
has been offered to the strikers for the pur- 
pose of staging benefit performances. 

Suspicious of Sothern Association 

The new association, proposed by E>. H. 
Sothern earlier in the week, had its first 
meeting Friday at the Hotel Blltmore. This 
action on the part of Sothern is looked upon 
by the actors as an effort to disorganise the 
Equity and has been likened by many of 
them to the N, T. A. which, in the vaudeville 
strike several years ago, succeeded in putting 
the White Bats out of business. Sothern, 
however, strongly denied that such was hi* 
intention in proposing a new organisation, 
hut the fact remains that the publicity con- 
cerning the proposed association all eminatea 
from the publicity department of the Pro- 
ducing Managers' Association. 

Only a handful of the profession attended 

the meeting. Those present were Eugene 
Walter, E. H. Sothern, Fay Balnter. Mar- 
Jorle Wood, Minnie Dupre, Mary Ryan, Mar- 
garet Anglln, William Collier, *nrs- Flske, 
Louis Maun, Charlotte Monterey, Lenore lu- 
nch, Gladys Hanson, Eugene Cowles, Hol- 
brook BHnn, David Warfleld, Mr. and Mrs. 
Cobnrn, Thomas B>. Shea, Lowell Sherman, 
Margaret St John, Edna Crawford, Frances 
Starr, Eileen Huban, Ina Claire, Amelia 
Bingham, Bnth Chester, Leo tMtrichsteln. 
Laura Walker, Donald Gallagher, Howard 
Kyle, Olive Wyndham, Janet Beecher and 
Burr Mcintosh, 

The meeting struck a snag and hit the 
rocks almost at Its inception when Dltrich- 
stein and a few followers declared that they 
would not have anything to do with the 
Sothern organisation if it were the purpose 
of the committee to break up the A. E. A. 
Dltrichstein added: 

"This talk about the breaking of contracts 
on the part of the actor la nothing. The 
managers have broken contracts fifty times 
over, and I am with the actors to the last 
ditch." 

The Sothern committee was composed of 
B. H. Sothern, Mrs. Flske, Augustus Thomas, 
Leo Dltrichstein, Howard Kyle and Lowell 
Sherman. . i 

On Friday, the court ordered the vacation 
of the Zlegfleld injunction In so far as Paul 
Turner, the only Equity member who had 
been served, was concerned. This was done 
at the suggestion of the managers' counsel. 

The reopening of "At 9.45" at tha nay- 
house on i^rlday was marked by the. Appear- 
ance of William A. Brady In the role of the 
butler; The piece played to a fairly good 



sited audience and there were no 




STRAIGHT 



WITH MAIDS OF AMERICA 



JANE MAY 



SOUBRETTE 



MAIDS OF AMERICA 



PRIMA 
DONNA 



LUCILLE ROGERS 



BON 
TONS 



EMILY CLARK 



With, Jaw 



'a Broadway Belles 



SAtVI BACHEN 

DOING BUSH MANAGEMENT-IKE WEBER With Chaa. Robinson's Parisian Flirt. 



GEO. CARROL,!. 



DOING TRAMP WITH THE JAZZ BABBIES 



BABE H E A LY 

Soobretta, with Some Show— Second Season with Barney Gerard 



MARGUERITE WELCH 

PRIMA DONNA WITH THE VOICE 
Baa WU1 Roam. Roahm and Richards, Strand Theatre Bid*. New Yesk 



JEW AND DUTCH 



OPEN FOR BURLESQUE NEXT SEASON 



BABE WELLINGTON 

IRRESISTIBLE BUNCH OF NERVES SOUBRETTE— NATIONAL WLNTERCARDEN 



ugust 20, 1919 



-TTHE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



ceil. . Others In the oast Iran Anifrila Blag- 
m. Chattel Hopkins, Irving Nugent, Leo 
eliiner, Jr., Barry Green, John .Cromwell, 
etc ColUns, Harry Davles, Richard Clark, 

ulse Barclay. Mildred Mac Lean, Marie 

a, Adda GleaeoivZelda Zeara and William 
Id well. 

SATURDAY 

r he strike assumed a different and bigger 
pert when, on Saturday night, the stage 
nds and musicians walked oat of three so- 
iled "scab" hoosee, bringing the total num- 
r of darkened by-strike theatres up to slx- 
sn and demonstrating that the support of 
» American Federation of Labor was to be 
ire than passive. 

The theatres that found themselves with- 
t stage hands or musicians on Saturday 
jht were the Knickerbocker, Cohan and 
irrls, and Century, playing, respectively, 
Jsten Lester," "The Royal vagabond," and 
!hn Chin Chow." "The Cocoannt Grove" 
ow on the Century roof was also affected. 
The strike was called by the American 
■deration of Musicians and the Interna- 
inal Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes 
>d Moving Picture Machine Operators of 
e United States and Canada, after Charles 

Shay, International President of the Aa- 
clntlon. had made an unsuccessful attempt 

Induce the Managers' Protective Aasoci- 
lon to confer with a representative of the 
rolty. It was intimated that if the man- 
ors did not yield by Monday the stage 
nds and musicians of all the theatres 
mid quit. 
The stage hands who struck are members 

Local No. 1 of the International Alliance. 
le New York Branch of the Musicians 
alon, now partly on , strike, la Local No. 
.0. 

Wouldn't Recognize. Equity 

Shay stated that he and a representative 
the musicians had attended a managers' 
sating on Saturday and for more than two 
mrs had pleaded with them to confer with 
representative of the Equity. 
The threat of the managers to bring suit 
ong the lines of the Denbury Hatters' cue 
as the straw that made organised labor 
lopt a Arm position in support of the actors, 
cording to a statement of F. G. Leemastar. 
cretary and treasurer of the International 
Ulance of Theatrical and Stage Employes. 
e declared that the strike of actors and 
Bgehands might assume nation-wide proper- 
una. 

A few hours following the afternoon con- 
rence with Shay, the managers sent him 
.o following letters: 
ear Mr. Sbay : 

It Is with much regret that the Producing 
anagers' Association is unable to accept the 
iggestlon of the Theatrical Mechanics' 
nlon and the Musicians' Union, of a eon- 
rer.ee with the Actors' Equity Association. 
9u assnre as In advance that the Actors' 
jolty Association will ask of us no stlpala- 
on to employ only lta members. The events 
! the past ten days have demonstrated that 
lough the Actors' Equity Association does 
>t now expressly demand the employment 
! none but Its members, recognition of the 
■aoclatlon would automatically ersate this 
indltlon In the theatre. 
The methods employed by this Association 
i the past ten days have proved this beyond 

dOUDt. The Intimidation, brow-beating, 
ireatenlng and coercion of actors, the pnb- 
t threats that no member of the Association 
ould ever appear on any stage with any 
■tor at present living np to his contract, 
le extraordinary third degree methods em- 
loyed to Intimidate actors from fulfilling en- 
igementa for which they were under con- 
act, the countless impositions on personal 
ght, comfort and safety, prove to use be- 
>nd all doubt that no actor's life or career 
i the theatre would be possible If he refused 
i ally himself with and be dictated to by 
le Actors' Faulty Association. 

This condition we believe • would be the 
■nth of the theatre, and we must oppose 
ils to the last. 

You also assure us that if we enter -Into 
rreement with the Actors' Equity Aaso- 
ation, there would be no possibility of a 
incerted'and general violation of Individual 
in tracts in the future. The present strike, 
> disregarding of existing contracts, makes 
difficult to agree with you in this. We 
el that so long as the Actors' Equity Aa- 
■ciatlon is the dictator of the individual 
-tor, the general violation of contracts is 
[ways a grave possibility, a possibility that 
•ne Of ns la financially able to face. 

Permit me to say that we are discussing 
lese matters In their relation to the highly 
idlvlduallied services of the artists with 
horn the theatre enters Into particular and 
ng time contracts. We have no hostility 
i labor organisations, or to those forms of It 
hich have proved themselves adaptable to 
indltions existing In the theatre. Our agree- 
)le relations with your organisations for 
le past twenty years are proof of thin. 

We realize that this step may mean a sev- 
ance of relations between us and our stage 
■ewe and musicians. We regret this deeply, 
it there Is consolation In the fact that our 
?ht is your fight and that if we succeed in 
Lvtng the theatre from being throttled It will 
) a guarantee of long future employment for 
>ur people. 

Deploring the conditions as much as you, 
it feeling that the theatre is at stake and 
e must forget everything but that, we are, 

■ Regretfully yours, . 
rns Pboddcino Umiami' AssocunoH. 

Charge rW Faith 
Bad faith on the part of the unions was 



"The messenger, reported that he delivered ■ 
the letter to the headquarters of the union," 
declared Klngaley. "at 7.80, which was half 
an hour after Mr. Shay had called out his 
Union and the Musicians' Union." 

The scenes around the theatres were repe- 
titions of when the actors walked out earlier 
In the strike. ■ Crowded to capacity, audiences 
were turned away at the eleventh hour and 
told that their ticket money would be re- 
funded at the box-office. A large- crowd of 
disappointed theatregoers thronged the side- 
walks on Broadway and the side streets In 
the forties, not knowing whither to go, while 
the few shows remaining open did record 
business. 

The managers did not make any statement 
as to their future plan of campaign but said 
they were rather relieved that the stage 
hands and musicians had taken some definite 
sort of action, declaring that this was the 
beginning of the end of the strike and that a 
showdown now was next in order. 

At Equity headquarters, the news was re- 
ceived with enthusiastic cheers that could be 
heard several blocks away from the bead-, 
quarters on West Forty-fifth street. The 
crowd In front of Martera's Restaurant, 
Where the Equity holds forth, was so thick 
that pedestrians walked around to either 
Forty-sixth or Forty-fourth street, rather 
than attempt to break through the excited 
throng. Songs, written especially for the 
Equity, were being sung in the middle of the 
street by a crowd of several hundred strikers 
who bad assembled there, forming themselves 
Into an Impromptu glee club. 

One of the most popular of the songs had 
the following lyric: 
'We are the A E. A's. 
Without us the producers cannot give their 

' plays. 
Everybody knows that we give the shows. 
And we entertain the public If it rains or 

snows. 
And In peace and war. 
Right from shore to shore. 
The actors give their services. 
And then some morel 
We never sqnell or whelp 
When yon ask for help. 

So do your bit and help us : 
We're the A. B. A's. 

Who entertained the Midlers ' " 
Through their lighting over there T 
Who filled their souls with gladness 
- When their hearts were full of care? 
Who stood behind the nation 
Through the sorry days of Wart 
Who helped the wounded heroes 
'Mid the cannons awful roar? 
Who went to all the hospitals 
To give the boys the plays 
Who brightened up their dreary nights ■ 
And lightened all their days? 
And who was it who worked 
In ninety thousand different ways? 
'Twas Uncle Sammy's actors; 
They're the A. E. A's. ! . 

"If a group of actors, reputable actors, 
would put faith in me," said George M Co- 
han on Saturday night, "and would resign 
from the Equity, I'd get out of the Man- 
agers' Association and back up a new actors' 
organization with $100,000 of my own 
money." '-•• 

This statement from Cohan was construed 
in Equity circles as another managerial at- 
tempt to break up the A. R. A. by the forma- 
tion of a somewhat similar organization, but 
one in which the managers would exercise 
chief control. What Bothern bad failed to 



tiled ont his men from the theatres dealt- 
ited by his organisation. 



JUST OUT 

McNALLY'S fj ft c 
BULLETIN ww r* 

Prico, Onet Dollar Per Copy. 

Qtiantlc collection of 136 pases of new, orient sad 
orltlnal taodertllo comedy material, embrarlni 
emrtalni that can at of use to toe pcrfotnuf. do 
muter what tort of an act, mooototue. parody or 
Oll-lo bits Is may miinrr. NotwlUstandlni that 
McNallr'e Bulletin No. I I Utter In quantity and 
better in quality than <rrer before too Dries remain. 



always, one dollar per o 
BtcMALLV'S SULIETIB *•. 



5 contains lbs follow - 



lni cUt-edge. up-to-date comedy material 

~ >C«EA«IS- 



■ 0K010GUES 



Each one 



18 sc«E»«isc 

posltrr* hit. 

14 sOARlsn ACTS tor tso malea Each act sa 
applause winner. 

11 SIIGIBAt ACTS for male and female. They'll 
male rood on any bill. 

40 SUSE-FISE r A bodies on an of Broadway's 

latest am bit*. 
A S00F-L1FTISC Tlia ACT. This act Is a 14 

karat, eare-are hlL 
A BATTUMG QUAITETTE ACT. Tula art U aires 

with humor of the rlb-tfckUnf. ktnl. 
AS ACT FSB TWO FEMALES. Tills act wul 

porltlrely make food. 
A SEW COMEDY SKETCH entitled "The Man 

Tamer-" Ifi s stream. 

A SWEAT SUBLEMUE entitled ■Tanke* Doocna." 

It's hrtsht. breezy sad bubbles onr with wit 

12 BIBSTSEL FISST-FASTS with Dde-epUWns 
jests sad bat-shot ernes an rata. 

CIASD ■IBST1EL FISAU entitled "It the ar- 
ena." Tell of liachs. 

NSIDKOS of cross-lire lata for alde-wala eon- 
wnaiioo. for ten males sad male and female. 

BESIDES other coaatd r mat erial which Is sseful 
- to las TauoWWe pal f miner, 
atesaenber the pries of ■■SALLY'S MUETia 

It. 3 It only one dollar per copy; or win sand 

yon SOLLETI IS Baa. 3. 4 mt 5 far S2.00. with 

wudkj back iJsbbVtt MM 

WM. McNALLY 



n East lWfc Street 



Near xscwl 



do earlier. In the week was now being tried 
again by Cohan, waa the opinion of the 
Equity members. Cohan still has many "loy- 
ala" among the profession despite bis present 
attitude and la undoubtedly the strongest 
nulling power that the managers possess, so 
far as the actor Is concerned. But this an- 
nouncement, coming az it did, almost simul- 
taneously with the walkout of the musicians 
and stagehands, was not even taken seriously 
by the Equity supporters. 

With regard to a rumor that the man- 
agers -contemplated enjoining* the actor 1 a 
show at the liexington, the idea waa em- 
phatically denied at managerial headquar- 
ters. 

Would Not Interrera 

"They can give a thousand benefits If 
they like," said one of the producers. 

Probably for the first time in stage his- 
tory, a group of stars and lesser principals 
listened, without interruption, to the talk 
of a chorus girl when pretty Edith Hallor, 
the one chorus girl to walk out of the "Fol- 
lies" addressed the Equity mass meeting 
on Saturday evening. She waa introduced 
as the vice-president of the Chorus Equity 
Association. 

Afterwards, questioned by a Clipper rep- 
resentative as to her right to the title of 
vice-president, she said: "From what I 
know, I waa elected vice-president of the 
chorus union. Anyway, that's what the 
Equity tells me. I've talked the thing over 
with Miss Tunis who also claims the vice- 
presidency, but I believe the office ia mine." 

Charlie Juddells also addressed Saturday 
night's Equity meeting and claimed the 
honor of having brought Attorney TJnter- 
meyer into the fold, declaring that AI 
Woods had suggested to him to take hia 
contract to the "Biggest Attorney" In New 
Tork and that he would find he had broken 
It with the managers. Juddells took his 
contract to Untermyer, who said that the 
contract had been broken, but on the man- 
agers side, whereupon Juddell had sug- 
gested to him to espouse the actors' cause. 

The meeting was marked . by less villl- 
flcatlon than usual, the strikers being ad- 
vized by Juddells as follows: "Don't knock 
the manager. Let us wage this light as 
ladles ana gentlemen. Some of the man- 
agers are mighty fine fellows. I don't know 
finer men than Al Woods, his brother or 
William Harris for Instance. This strike 
will be over soon and we will go back to 
work for some of these men whom we are 
now talking against. Lot us make this a 
fight of principles and not of personalities 
and when the whole thing! is over and we 
have won, let us show everyone that we are 
big. Nevar shall we go around with a chip 
on our shoulder; rather, we shall always 
be equitable." 

"East Is Wast" Reopens 

The managers added one victory to thelr 
score on Saturday night with the reopen- 
ing of "East Is West" at the Aator The- 
atre. . . 

A comic light waz thrown on the situation 
when Ed Wynne issued an open challenge 
to any member of the Producing Managers- 
Association, which provided that he would 
sell peanuts on Forty-second and Broad- 
way for a whole year In the event the ac- 
tors lost, If a manager would consent to 
work a whole year as an elevator runner 
If the scales balanced the other way. Wynn 
said: 

'1 am Issuing- this challenge In all seri- 
ousness. I mean no malice toward Oeorge 
M. Cohan by making this statement. I 
want to go on record right here and now 
that I lova George M. Cohan, although the 
actors up around the Equity Association 
hlsa me for. it. But I have the courage of 
my convictions." 

SUNDAY 

The strike situation remained unchanged 
on Sunday except that two; new possibilities 
loomed up in the present deadlock either of 
which would mean the closing of all theatres. 
If actually carried out. On the one side it 
was hinted by some of the managers that 
they may try some of the actors* own tactics 
and, on their own account, close all play- 
houses with a view of bringing the players 
to terms. 

This would virtually mean a managers' 
strike and would be directly opposed to the 
course that the managers have pursued thus 
far In the situation, which has been to keep 
open as many playhouses aa possible. 

The other threat came from the actors' 
side of the trenches, they hinting that a 
complete shutdown of all legitimate theatres 
may be brought about by a more extended 
strike of stagehands and' musicians. 

When told of the threatened "managers' 
Strike," Frank Qillmore, Executive Secretary 
of the A, E. A., made the following state- 
ment : 

"I can only say that that will not alter 
our resolution to stick until final victory Is 
assured. I wish to remind the managers that 
a theatre remains a theatre only so long ss 
actors are performing there. Without actors 
the theatre Is nothing but a building. The 
actors' talents can be as easily exercised in 
a halt. In a tent, or even on a vacant lot 
The public will gather to see the actor, no 
matter where he acts. 

"Therefore, if the theatres are closed to 
us, we shall organize companies to tour the 
country, lust ss Mrs. Flake and Mme. Bern- 
hardt did when a powerful trust discrimi- 
nated against them.' r ' 

The managers held no meeting on Sunday 
and their office in the Cohan and Harris 
Building waa dosed for the day. 

A statement covering several pages, banged 
out on the Ztegfeld typewriter by Leon Frled- 

(CcadwKj o» #aga Jo.) 



WM. F. (Bffly) HARMS 

Hoboksm. N. J. 

THEATRICAL ENTERPRI3*3 

( M esas ir est T. B, O) 



LYRIC WRITERS 

Would like t» haw from writes*, either novice 
or professional, who will co-operate in pro- 
ducing songs that will become "sore bits." 
Address "COMPOSER,- in care of dbpsr. 



MAY BELL MARKS. CO. 

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parte. Rehearsals Aug. 35th. Write or wire. 

R. W. MARKS, P-wth, * * v 



Wanted Vesnl 
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Address *M. SIMM. 206 Wart 
B. V. 



Fastur»>» 
Mis ran*. 
St, St LesteLssaa. 



WANTEO 

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